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#1381
caltrek

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Cited below is a public document, so copyright related restrictions on length should not apply.

 

The State of the Urban/Rural Digital Divide

 

https://www.ntia.doc...-digital-divide

 

 

 

While 75 percent of Americans reported using the Internet in July 2015, the longstanding disparity between urban and rural users persists and has emerged in the adoption of new technologies such as the smartphone and social media, according to the latest computer and Internet use data collected for NTIA. This suggests that in spite of advances in both policy and technology, the barriers to Internet adoption existing in rural communities are complex and stubborn. In particular, Americans who were otherwise less likely to use the Internet--such as those with lower levels of family income or education--faced an even larger disadvantage when living in a rural area. Conversely, rural individuals with higher levels of education or family income did not have significantly lower adoption rates than their urban counterparts, according to the data. The data comes from NTIA's Computer and Internet Use Supplement to the Census Bureau's Current Population Survey.

 

While the digital divide appears to be closing for some demographic communities, the gap between rural and urban populations has remained remarkably consistent for at least as long as NTIA has been gathering data on Internet use. In 1998, 28 percent of Americans living in rural areas used the Internet, compared to 34 percent of those in urban areas. Even as Internet use increased dramatically overall, a rural/urban gap remained in 2015, with 69 percent of rural residents reporting using the Internet, versus 75 percent of urban residents. This data indicates a fairly constant 6-9 percentage point gap between rural and urban communities' Internet use over time.

 

All persons, regardless of race or ethnicity, were less likely to use the Internet when living in rural areas, but certain groups of rural residents face a particularly large digital divide.  For example, 78 percent of Whites nationally used the Internet in 2015, compared to 68 percent of African Americans and 66 percent of Hispanics. In rural areas, 70 percent of White Americans had adopted the Internet, compared to 59 percent of African Americans and 61 percent of Hispanics.

 

People with lower levels of educational attainment were even more likely to find themselves on the wrong side of the digital divide when living in a rural area. Our analysis reveals that the digital divide was greatest between rural and urban users without a high school diploma. Only 52 percent of those who lack a high school diploma and live in a rural area reported using the Internet, compared with 59 percent of those who live in urban households with a similar level of education. The gap was a little smaller for high school graduates, where 63 percent of rural residents reported Internet use compared with 69 percent of urban residents and 67 percent of all Americans. Eighty-eight percent of Americans with a college degree used the Internet nationally, with rural and urban college graduates adopting at approximately the same rate.

 

Digital Divides Beyond Internet Adoption

 

Living in a rural area was also associated with lower levels of device use, Internet use at particular locations, and participation in online activities. Overall, we found rural users were less likely than their urban counterparts to report using a desktop (29 percent for rural users to 35 percent for urban users), a laptop (39 percent to 48 percent), a tablet (24 percent to 30 percent), or an Internet-enabled mobile phone (45 percent to 54 percent). Rural residents were also less likely to use the Internet from home (61 percent to 69 percent) and at work (22 percent to 29 percent). In terms of online services and functions, rural residents who indicated they did use the Internet were still less likely than urban residents to use email (86 percent to 92 percent), social media (68 percent to 71 percent), and online video or voice conferencing (28 percent to 38 percent) than Internet users in urban areas. While some of these differences may seem relatively modest, they are statistically significant. Lastly, rural individuals were more likely than their urban counterparts not to own any Internet compatible devices (33 percent to 26 percent), and were less likely to own more than one device.

 

Based on these results, it appears there is a continuing need to address the obstacles rural residents face in Internet use. For instance, some households may require subsidies to make the Internet more affordable, while others may need digital literacy training to make the Internet more useful to them. Even today, some remote rural communities still lack Internet access at all or the service available may be poor or prohibitively expensive.

 

NTIA has been working for the last eight years to bring affordable broadband to communities that lack it through our broadband grant program and its successor program, BroadbandUSA, which is providing technical assistance to communities seeking to expand broadband access and adoption. The latest data underscores that we still have more work to do to ensure Americans in all communities have access to affordable broadband and have the digital skills to help them enjoy the many benefits it provides.

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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#1382
Sciencerocks

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Breakthrough in ultra-fast data processing at nanoscale
October 20, 2017

A research team led by Associate Professor Christian Nijhuis from the Department of Chemistry at the NUS Faculty of Science (second from right) has recently invented a novel “converter” that can harness the speed and small size of plasmons …more

A research team from the National University of Singapore has recently invented a novel "converter" that can harness the speed and small size of plasmons for high frequency data processing and transmission in nanoelectronics.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...oscale.html#jCp


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#1383
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Windows 10 Fall Creators Update Leaves Up to 30GB in Installation Files

Windows 10’s Fall Creators Update (FCU) dropped earlier this week, to generally positive reviews. The new OS version isn’t a radical change from the previous Creators Update, but it does introduce some new features and improvements to Edge, OneDrive, GPU monitoring, battery meters, and more. One potential niggle, however, is that the OS apparently has a bloated footprint, and leaves up to 30GB of data behind it when finished, BetaNews reports.

We recommend taking this with a grain of salt, since the OS footprint can vary depending on how new your OS installation is and whether you’ve previously updated it or installed fresh. This can leave the aforementioned 30GB of files on your system, in at least some cases, which would be particularly impressive in my case considering my current Windows folder is 30GB. Google suggests this is roughly average, with a 20GB estimated footprint for Windows 10 64-bit and a range of 20GB to 35GB depending on the system. Since I’m actually using an OS image that was originally laid down as a Windows 7 install back in 2011, 30GB doesn’t seem unreasonable.

The conventional way for dealing with this problem is to either hit Start and type “Disk Cleanup” or to open File Explorer, right-click on the hard drive you wish to cleanup, and choose “Properties.” A variety of menu options will then be available, but the one you want, “Disk Cleanup” is shown in the default General tab. Click this tab, then the “Clean up System Files” option, and you’ll be able to select from the full range of system and non-system files (memory dumps, recycling bin, etc).

 

https://www.extremet...tallation-files


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#1384
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Intel May Deploy AVX-512 in Upcoming 10nm Cannon Lake CPUs
    By Joel Hruska on October 20, 2017 at 10:30 am

 

When Intel launched Skylake-SP (aka the Core X-series) earlier this year, one of the major features of the product family, in addition to a revamped L2 cache structure, was its support for Intel’s latest SIMD instruction set, AVX-512. AVX-512 has previously been reserved for Intel’s HPC (High-Performance Computing) Knights Landing. But Intel launched it as a feature in some of its Xeon Scalable Processors and the Skylake-SP-derived Core i9 and Core i7 CPUs launched earlier this year.

The Core i9-7900X (10-core) and above, including the Core i9-7980XE, have two 512-bit AVX-512 ports, while the 8-core and six-core parts have a single port for FMA-512. This means the higher end CPUs can support much higher throughput (64 single-precision or 32 double-precision operations per cycle, compared with 32 SP/16 DP operations on the 7800X and 7820X).

 

https://www.extremet...annon-lake-cpus


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#1385
Yuli Ban

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Google's parent company has made internet balloons available in Puerto Rico, the first time it's offered Project Loon in the US

Two of the search giant's "Project Loon" balloons are already over the country enabling texts, emails and basic web access to AT&T customers

  • Google's parent company Alphabet, in collaboration with AT&T, is now delivering limited internet connectivity in Puerto Rico through its internet balloon project called Project Loon.
  • This is the first time Loon has ever been available in the US.
  • That means that some AT&T customers in Puerto Rico can access limited internet connectivity on their smartphones — enough to send text messages and access some online info from these balloons floating through the atmosphere.

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#1386
Yuli Ban

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1 billion could be using 5G by 2023 with China set to dominate

The next revolution in mobile technology looks set to be led by China.
5G, the fifth generation of mobile network, doesn't yet exist but aims to provide faster data speeds and more bandwidth to carry ever-growing levels of web traffic.
Analysts at CCS Insight predict the technology will be in place by 2020 and said in a report Wednesday that there will be more than one billion users of 5G by 2023, with more than half based in China.
 
"China will dominate 5G thanks to its political ambition to lead technology development, the inexorable rise of local manufacturer Huawei and the breakneck speed at which consumers have upgraded to 4G connections," said Marina Koytcheva, VP Forecasting at CCS Insight.


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#1387
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DARPA Brain Stimulation can accelerate learning by 40%, know why it works, could be common by 2023
brian wang | October 23, 2017 |

 

HRL Laboratories, LLC, researchers have determined how non-invasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) could increase performance of associative learning. The researchers found that when applied to the prefrontal cortex, tDCS affects a wide portion of the brain, causing changes in functional connectivity between different brain areas that increased learning speed in macaques.

They can now target stimulation, intervening only at critical points, when memory formation is most likely to occur. “We’re replicating monkey experiment with stimulation occurring only for one second” he said, “just when it gets the reward.” That’s when the association is made. They will eventually seek out FDA approval for a particular device. He believes that in 5-10 years, use of this technology will be widespread.

 

https://www.nextbigf...on-by-2023.html


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#1388
Alislaws

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DARPA Brain Stimulation can accelerate learning by 40%, know why it works, could be common by 2023

 

Cool! Hope this actually comes to something. If it does this could be where we begin to see people who embrace technology start to pull ahead of people who reject it.

 

Obviously there have always been people who have gotten ahead from being up to date on the latest trends and people who have fallen behind after technology changed things, but if some people are learning at 150% speed and some are not It won't be long before companies wanting the best employees will only look at people who are using this technology, especially for new employees where ability to learn is one of the most important factors. 



#1389
bgates276

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DARPA Brain Stimulation can accelerate learning by 40%, know why it works, could be common by 2023

 

Cool! Hope this actually comes to something. If it does this could be where we begin to see people who embrace technology start to pull ahead of people who reject it.

 

Obviously there have always been people who have gotten ahead from being up to date on the latest trends and people who have fallen behind after technology changed things, but if some people are learning at 150% speed and some are not It won't be long before companies wanting the best employees will only look at people who are using this technology, especially for new employees where ability to learn is one of the most important factors. 

 

 

For a while, people have been saying 'knowledge is power' and 'information is power'. For quite some time, knowledge, skills and abilities, usually acquired through formal education (Ie. a university degree), was a sure way to move up in society if you were smart and ambitious enough. However, if it gets to the point where humans can be enhanced so that everyone knows everything, due to the laws of supply and demand, these things will become just another cheap commodity, and I can see at some point that it will be literally impossible to climb the socio-economic ladder.   

 

However, I'm not sure all is lost. One thing I don't believe they can do (at least yet), is make someone creative. If you are both incredibly smart and creative (Ie. a genius), you might still be able to get somewhere. However, it's obvious that these people have always been a statistical minority.

 

Another upside of this technology is that while it may be difficult to 'move up' on an individual basis, in fact, generally speaking, society itself will have improved or moved up. We may not all be living in mansions, but I can see quality of life improving with future technologies like this.


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#1390
Raklian

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I'll need it to conquer the subtler nuances of the Japanese language to which, when I utter it, my Japanese listeners giggle but never bother pointing out why. My aging brain needs to get it right! :)


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#1391
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Study finds fringe communities on Reddit and 4chan have high influence on flow of alternative news to Twitter
November 2, 2017 by Tiffany Westry Womack

 

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Cyprus University of Technology, University College London and Telefonica Research have conducted the first large-scale measurement of how mainstream and alternative news flows through multiple social media platforms.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...native.html#jCp


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#1392
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Casual Gaming surpassing traditional video games
brian wang | November 2, 2017 |
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In 2017, social/casual gaming global revenue will surpass traditional gaming according to PWc and continue to accelerate away at a much higher growth rate for the remainder of the forecast period. Social/casual gaming will surge at 11.9% CAGR and is expected to reach US$74.3bn by 2021.

Total video games revenue in mainland China reached US$15.4 billion last year and will grow at an annual rate of 11.2 per cent to a forecasted US$26.2 billion in 2021, making the country the second-largest market after the US, PwC said on Tuesday.
Cecilia Yau, entertainment and media leader at PwC, said the study examined multiple revenue streams in the sector, ranging from game sales and sponsorship to revenues in streaming.

 

https://www.nextbigf...ideo-games.html


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#1393
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The Tech Industry Is Clueless About People. Let’s Debug It.

 

http://www.motherjon...hter-boettcher/

 

Introduction:

 

(Mother Jones) In October, Google Maps rolled out an experimental feature that estimated the number of calories burned when people walked to their destinations. The feature had a little quirk, though: It used mini-cupcakes to illustrate the calorie counts.

 

The backlash was immediate. Users pointed out that calorie counts could act as a trigger for people with eating disorders. Others found it shaming, and questioned how Google was counting the calories. And the kicker? There was no easy way to turn the feature off. A week after it was introduced to iPhone users, Google ditched it, citing “strong user feedback,” according to TechCrunch. 

 

Tech design failures similar to the Google cupcake fiasco are the subject of Sara Wachter-Boettcher’s new book, Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic Tech. A web consultant who has worked in the industry for a decade, Wachter-Boettcher details countless mishaps, from algorithms that categorized black people as gorillas or failed to recognize names as legitimate to period-tracking apps designed by clearly tone-deaf dudes. Many tech products are full of “blind spots, biases, and outright ethical blunders,” she writes, and these oversights “exacerbate unfairness and leave vulnerable people out.” 

 

Wachter-Boettcher isn’t totally anti-tech, but she argues that coders, designers, and the industry at large need to do a better job of checking their biases. She brings us into the design process, showing how a lack of diversity can lead to very narrow ideas about who is using the product. Seemingly small things, for instance, the default choices users are presented with in an online form, can have a tremendous impact on people’s lives—especially as tech moves further into fields such as predictive policing or personalized education. I asked Wachter-Boettcher about the biases she has observed and what a more inclusive tech product might look like. 

20171103_unlike-key.jpg?w=990

Mother Jones illustration; Dimitris66/Getty


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#1394
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Facebook estimates 200 million users may be fake: report
BY JOSH DELK at the Hill

http://thehill.com/b...-be-fake-report

"SNIP.........

Facebook now estimates that nearly 200 million of its users may be fake accounts.

Facebook, Twitter and Google testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee in a three-day session this week, providing investigators information on the efforts of foreign actors to meddle in U.S. politics.

One of the investigators' concerns, according to The New York Times, is the widespread use of "fake" social media accounts.

Twitter also reports that nearly 5 percent of its user base, or more than 16 million accounts, are fake "spam" accounts, Sean Edgett, the social media giant's acting general counsel, said in testimony.

.......SNIP"

 


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#1395
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Qualcomm confirms Broadcom's $100 billion buyout offer
Source: San Diego Union-Tribune

 

Qualcomm confirmed Monday that it has received a buyout offer from Broadcom of $70 a share in cash and stock, in the largest deal in the history of the semiconductor industry.

The San Diego wireless giant said in a statement that Broadcom’s unsolicited offer consisted of $60 a share in cash and $10 a share in Broadcom’s stock.

Qualcomm’s board and financial advisers will examine the deal, and declined further comment.

The offer likely will face tough scrutiny from global regulators.

 

Read more: http://www.sandiegou...1103-story.html


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#1396
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China's supercomputers race past US to world dominance
Source: CNET

 

China doesn't just have the single fastest supercomputer in the world. It now dominates the list of the 500 fastest.

BY STEPHEN SHANKLAND NOVEMBER 13, 2017 6:00 AM PST

For years, China has claimed the top spot on a list of the 500 fastest supercomputers. Now it dominates the overall list, too, pushing the United States into second place.

For the first time, China has the most systems on the Top500 list, 202, up from 159 six months ago. The US dropped from 169 to 144. And in terms of the total performance of those machines, China also overtook the US, the Top500 supercomputer list organizers said. ... The news underscores the relentless ascent of China's supercomputing trajectory in recent years. It also marks a notable shift in the international balance of high-end computing power that's closely tied to industrial, academic and military abilities.
....

Supercomputers, mammoth machines that can occupy entire buildings and use thousands of processors, are useful for tasks like simulating nuclear weapons explosions, forecasting weather, designing aircraft and investigating the cosmos by reconstructing billions of year of the universe's history. ... At the SC 17 supercomputing show starting Monday in Denver, NASA will show off supercomputing work into precise simulations of climate change on Earth, the aerodynamics of drones that fly using multiple propellers and detailed forecasts of shock-wave damage from meteors.

The Top500 list, released twice a year in conjunction with the annual SC conference, is compiled by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee and cloud-computing company Prometeus. It ranks supercomputers by how fast they can perform mathematical calculations on an imperfect but still useful speed test called Linpack. Results are measured in floating-point operations per second, or FLOPS.

 

Read more: https://www.cnet.com...n-top-500-list/


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#1397
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Some Human-Computer Interaction news:

https://www.technolo...eds/?set=609356

This is the best part:

To that point, he showed off of an alpha version of Neurable’s first typing tool. The current speed record for typing via brain-computer interface is eight words per minute, but that uses an invasive implant to read signals from a person’s brain. “We’re working to beat that record, even though we’re using a noninvasive technology,” explains Alcaide. “We’re getting about one letter per second, which is still fairly slow, because it’s an early build. We think that in the next year we can further push that forward.”

One letter per second is insanely fast for a non-invasive BCI! If they can double that, then people with ALS or paralysis might be able to type at a near normal speed (on the low end).
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#1398
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Some Human-Computer Interaction news:

https://www.technolo...eds/?set=609356

This is the best part:
 

To that point, he showed off of an alpha version of Neurable’s first typing tool. The current speed record for typing via brain-computer interface is eight words per minute, but that uses an invasive implant to read signals from a person’s brain. “We’re working to beat that record, even though we’re using a noninvasive technology,” explains Alcaide. “We’re getting about one letter per second, which is still fairly slow, because it’s an early build. We think that in the next year we can further push that forward.”


One word per second is insanely fast for a non-invasive BCI! If they can double that, then people with ALS or paralysis might be able to type at a near normal speed (on the low end).

 

 

Didn't he say they were getting one letter per second, not one word per second? Typing at 'thinking speed' seems to be quite a ways off. I wouldn't be surprised if it was at least a decade or two before it was perfected, much the way voice recognition has also taken a fair amount of time to get to the current state. 



#1399
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China's supercomputers race past US to world dominance
Source: CNET

 

China doesn't just have the single fastest supercomputer in the world. It now dominates the list of the 500 fastest.

BY STEPHEN SHANKLAND NOVEMBER 13, 2017 6:00 AM PST

For years, China has claimed the top spot on a list of the 500 fastest supercomputers. Now it dominates the overall list, too, pushing the United States into second place.

For the first time, China has the most systems on the Top500 list, 202, up from 159 six months ago. The US dropped from 169 to 144. And in terms of the total performance of those machines, China also overtook the US, the Top500 supercomputer list organizers said. ... The news underscores the relentless ascent of China's supercomputing trajectory in recent years. It also marks a notable shift in the international balance of high-end computing power that's closely tied to industrial, academic and military abilities.
....

Supercomputers, mammoth machines that can occupy entire buildings and use thousands of processors, are useful for tasks like simulating nuclear weapons explosions, forecasting weather, designing aircraft and investigating the cosmos by reconstructing billions of year of the universe's history. ... At the SC 17 supercomputing show starting Monday in Denver, NASA will show off supercomputing work into precise simulations of climate change on Earth, the aerodynamics of drones that fly using multiple propellers and detailed forecasts of shock-wave damage from meteors.

The Top500 list, released twice a year in conjunction with the annual SC conference, is compiled by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee and cloud-computing company Prometeus. It ranks supercomputers by how fast they can perform mathematical calculations on an imperfect but still useful speed test called Linpack. Results are measured in floating-point operations per second, or FLOPS.

 

Read more: https://www.cnet.com...n-top-500-list/

 

On a somewhat interesting note (to me, anyway), there's 181 petaflop computers in the world now, which is the biggest increase ever by a pretty decent margin.

 

June 2008: 1

November 2008: 2 (+1)

June 2009: 2

November 2009: 2

June 2010: 3 (+1)

November 2010: 7 (+4)

June 2011: 10 (+3)

November 2011: 10

June 2012: 20 (+10)

November 2012: 23 (+3)

June 2013: 26 (+3)

November 2013: 31 (+5)

June 2014: 37 (+6)

November 2014: 50 (+13)

June 2015: 67 (+17)

November 2015: 81 (+14)

June 2016: 95 (+14)

November 2016: 117 (+22)

June 2017: 138 (+21)

November 2017: 181 (+43)

 

My guess is that there will be over 250 by the June 2018 list, and that almost all computers on the November 2018 list will be measured in petaflops.

 

As for position 500, it's 548.7 teraflops. It was number 369 on the list last time, dropping 131 spots in five months. It would have been number one on the list in November 2007, and would have been on the top 10 up through and including June 2010 (where it would have been in 7th). 500th place for June was 432 teraflops, a full 116 teraflops slower.


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#1400
starspawn0

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@bgates. Yes, he said one letter per second. That’s what I took the article to say, but for some reason wrote the word “word”.

1 letter per second is insanely fast for a wearable.

You can see that was what I was thinking, as I said double that would be on the low end of normal typing. If it were double 1 word per second, that would be 120 words per minute, which is certainly not the low end!

I edited my post accordingly.
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