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Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, & Holograms News and Discussions

virtual reality augmented reality Oculus Rift smart glasses mixed reality Gear VR holograms holographic screen hologram VR

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#941
Sciencerocks

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Sony updates PlayStation VR headset for a cleaner look
VR
Darren QuickSony has now integrated stereo headphones into the updated PlayStation VR headset
 

Sony has announced its PlayStation VR headset is getting a minor update. Coming a year after the launch of the original PlayStation VR, the new version bears the model number CUH-ZVR2 and will clean up a bit of the cable clutter at the back of the headset, with an updated Processor Unit also adding HDR pass-through capabilities.

Whereas headphones currently need to be plugged into a jack located on the connection cable trailing from the rear of the unit, Sony has now integrated stereo headphones into the new headset. Coupled with a slimmed down connection cable, the result is a cleaner look compared to its CUH-ZVR1 predecessor.

 

http://newatlas.com/...-updated/51591/


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#942
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Facebook Finally Unveiled a Standalone VR Headset, And It’s Just $199

IN BRIEF
Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerburg unveiled the Oculus Go today, at the Oculus Connect 4 keynote event. This low-cost, standalone VR headset will be available early next year, potentially introducing VR to a wider market.

At the Oculus Connect 4 keynote, happening now in San Jose, Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerburg just unveiled a device that could make virtual reality (VR) technologies more accessible. Introducing the Oculus Go: a standalone VR headset that won’t cost you an arm and a leg.
At only $199, Zuckerberg called it “the most accessible VR headset yet.” Compared to the Oculus Rift, which costs about $600, the Oculus Go is undeniably inexpensive. Of course, at that price, it won’t offer you exactly the same VR experience. The Oculus Go will allow you to spin around while in virtual reality but not move around freely.


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#943
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WebVR for casual virtual reality in your browser
brian wang | October 31, 2017 |
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WebVR is an open specification that makes it possible to experience VR in your browser. The goal is to make it easier for everyone to get into VR experiences, no matter what device you have. You need two things to experience WebVR: a headset and a compatible browser.

You need two things to experience WebVR: a headset and a compatible browser.

The easiest way to get started is with a basic headset like Google Cardboard. Just drop your phone in and you’re ready to go. You can also use your phone with more advanced headsets like Samsung Gear VR and Google Daydream.

PC For the best performance and most features, you can use a VR headset connected to a computer, like Oculus Rift or HTC VIVE. Those will allow for higher framerates, higher resolutions, and even let you walk around in VR.

Laptop or phone Or, on some sites, you can just use your computer or phone without a headset. You won’t be able to see in 3D or interact as fully in most VR worlds, but you can still look around in 360 degrees.

 

https://www.nextbigf...ur-browser.html


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#944
caltrek

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What’s holding back VR?

 

https://techcrunch.c...olding-back-vr/

 

Introduction:

 

(TechCrunch) When it comes to virtual reality, we’re in a classic tech-industry moment: lots of chatter but seemingly little movement. We hear future-focused cheerleading from all corners about VR’s incredible potential, yet the 6.3 million headsets shipped last year is hardly cause for a ticker-tape parade.

 

So what’s holding back VR?

 

The nature of the technology, for starters. VR is not a tweak to an existing platform; it is a tectonic shift in how we interact with information and each other. It engages our senses of sight, sound and touch at a deeper and more complex level than anything we’ve seen in desktop, laptop and mobile technologies.

 

Getting VR right will take a lot of original and highly focused work. That work is ongoing, and as an investor in this space I believe the payoff will be dramatic once the right pieces fall into place. As I wrote last year, VR will eventually be bigger than reality itself.

 

In the near term, I see three barriers to be solved in a specific order to keep VR moving forward. One is relatively easy. The other two will take a bit of time — but there is emerging evidence we’re getting there.

See linked article for a discussion of the three barriers.

gettyimages-526725634.jpg?w=738


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#945
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Olympus is down to business with smart glasses for work sites
November 8, 2017 by Nancy Owano

 

(Tech Xplore)—Olympus has a new EyeTrek Insight EI-10 smart glasses for business use.

These have a 2.4-megapixel camera, said Michael Zhang on Monday in PetaPixel, and he described various features; one of them is that you can see the built-in display without blocking your vision. Olympus on its site noted they have a patented "Pupil-Division Optical System" that reduces the size of the display for a clear view of the surrounding environment.

Do the EI-10 glasses sound familiar? The header from New Reality: "Olympus Muscles in on Google Glass Territory with Enterprise AR Smartglasses." Brittany Roston in SlashGear thought the Olympus smart glasses looked "like Google Glass on steroids."

 

https://techxplore.c...sses-sites.html


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#946
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After a long 2 years of living under a rock, I learnt from YouTube that there's a service Nvidia is providing to budget gamers called Geforce Now. For those who don't know, GeForce Now is a virtual machine you rent from Nvidia for gaming. 
 
Gaming PC's are expensive, cumbersome, often ugly, and most people have ditched the tower PC lifestyle for laptops or tablets as their primary computer. A way to bring gaming-PC performance to these lightweight portables would turn the gaming industry on its head. 
 
Nvidia is giving us a solution. By running servers of its GTX 1080 and 1060 graphics cards, users can rent a virtual machine over the net and enjoy low-latency games maxed to ultra-high settings on any low-powered computer with an internet connection. That includes Macbooks. 
 
gridrack2.jpg?itok=LAt6eHHb
 
You might think that the latency would make these games unplayable or they would chow through costly amounts of data. It turns out reviewers with internet speeds under 50mbps were able to game on the service fine with all graphical settings maxed out. One video showed a dude using his phone's cellular internet in a park to game just fine.
 
Now there are a few thoughts I immediately have about VR in light of this service. VR headsets are for the most part tethered to their computers with their cables. They also either require expensive gaming PC's or are limited by the VR games low-powered consoles can shoulder. Both qualms are about to be solved and VR is going to become an insanely compelling addition to people's device lineups. 
 
With Oculus Go, cables can go and people can sit back on their couch or lay back in bed with these headsets on. They won't have to worry about cables getting in their way as they walk around the room and can take the entertainment anywhere in the house. More importantly, they'll be able to stream the games using virtual machines on an Nvidia server. They'll have access to bleeding edge hardware without needing to purchase, build, or house a gaming rig. 
 
oculusgotable.jpg
 
So in 2019 or maybe 2020, I expect to be able to buy a <$300 wifi-enabled headset, which I can put on as soon as I get home and play whatever game I want from my Steam account via an Nvidia virtual machine. Maxed out settings and cable-free. 

 

And to all those nay-sayers, VR is going to change everything. Don't doubt it.

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#947
bgates276

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Just how cheap a computer are we talking about here? Would a mini-pc or Intel stick cut it? And how much does the Geforce Now service cost? If it costs too much, over a couple of years, it will eat up what you would have saved from just buying a gaming PC and buying the games off of steam. Plus, in this regard, you don't actually own the games. Another question that is important is the selection of games. I've already come across Geforce Now, and to be honest, the selection didn't look that great. I believe that Playstation has a similar streaming service and it has the same issue with a poor selection of current titles to choose from. All this assuming latency isn't a problem (which many people say is).



#948
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This page should give you a rough idea of your required setup. It’s important to say that this may be for the Nvidia shield only (Nvidia’s first gen streaming service) whereas GeForce Now allegedly works on any device.

https://shield.nvidi...-requirements/2

The main idea to focus on is that the computation is outsourced to Nvidia’s server, so any device that can stream 1080p video should be able to handle it fine.

On the price side, the service costs $25 for 20 hours of gaming iirc. For those who like to kick back and trial new games or unwind when they have free time, that’s a very competitive price and 20 hours will go a long way for the casual gamer. That also means that it’d take 1,200 hours of gameplay to break even if you instead buy / build a $1,500 gaming rig yourself. And that would also be kitted out with inferior hardware to the 1080’s GeForce Now is offering. Also, since it’s pay-as-you-go, as new hardware comes out each year it’ll be implemented into the service. That compares with upgrading your PC hardware, so from an economic standpoint for almost any user (hardcore gamer or casual), this is cheaper than owning your own.

You do own the games. The service allows you to play any game you have in your steam library. Apparently around 100 titles have been optimised for GeForce now already, accounting for 90% of all gameplay hours on steam. I’ve perused through the list and there are all the games I’m familiar with plus dozens I’ve never heard of. Iirc, they’re looking to have 250 games optimised by the end of next year so content isn’t an issue.

The specs page I linked above includes an idea of lag and latency. Obviously your ping is going to be determined first and foremost by your proximity to one of these servers. In Australia, GeForce now isn’t even on offer today so that goes to show how limited their locations are. In my post I was specifically saying that GeForce now will be a game changer for cable-free vr headsets like the oculus go in the 2019-2020 timeframe so both an increase in the supply of this or competing services as well as the inexorable march in price-performance of internet connections will make the service even more usable than it is today. And today I’m hearing from YouTube reviewers that’s latency isn’t a problem.
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#949
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Pokemon Go follow up will be Augmented Reality Harry Potter Game
brian wang | November 9, 2017 |
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Almost five years ago Niantic launched Ingress, first augmented reality mobile game, turning real-world streets, neighborhoods and cities into a global game board, and bringing people together in a shared digital reality. The incentives it created for exploration, exercise, and real-world social interaction helped spawn a global community of fans, united by their shared experience, and laid the foundations for Niantic’s real-world AR gaming platform.

Pokémon GO brought that vision to the world at unprecedented scale and served as a catalyst for the further development of the Niantic platform.

The new Augmented Reality gam is Harry Potter: Wizards Unite. Players will learn spells, explore their real world neighborhoods and cities to discover and fight legendary beasts and team up with others to take down powerful enemies. Niantic partners with Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment, and WB Games San Francisco’s development team to bring this magical and beloved series to life in a brand new way. Harry Potter: Wizards Unite will leverage the full stack of the Niantic Platform while also providing an opportunity to pioneer all new technology and gameplay mechanics.

 

https://www.nextbigf...otter-game.html


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#950
bgates276

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This page should give you a rough idea of your required setup. It’s important to say that this may be for the Nvidia shield only (Nvidia’s first gen streaming service) whereas GeForce Now allegedly works on any device.

https://shield.nvidi...-requirements/2

The main idea to focus on is that the computation is outsourced to Nvidia’s server, so any device that can stream 1080p video should be able to handle it fine.

On the price side, the service costs $25 for 20 hours of gaming iirc. For those who like to kick back and trial new games or unwind when they have free time, that’s a very competitive price and 20 hours will go a long way for the casual gamer. That also means that it’d take 1,200 hours of gameplay to break even if you instead buy / build a $1,500 gaming rig yourself. And that would also be kitted out with inferior hardware to the 1080’s GeForce Now is offering. Also, since it’s pay-as-you-go, as new hardware comes out each year it’ll be implemented into the service. That compares with upgrading your PC hardware, so from an economic standpoint for almost any user (hardcore gamer or casual), this is cheaper than owning your own.

You do own the games. The service allows you to play any game you have in your steam library. Apparently around 100 titles have been optimised for GeForce now already, accounting for 90% of all gameplay hours on steam. I’ve perused through the list and there are all the games I’m familiar with plus dozens I’ve never heard of. Iirc, they’re looking to have 250 games optimised by the end of next year so content isn’t an issue.

The specs page I linked above includes an idea of lag and latency. Obviously your ping is going to be determined first and foremost by your proximity to one of these servers. In Australia, GeForce now isn’t even on offer today so that goes to show how limited their locations are. In my post I was specifically saying that GeForce now will be a game changer for cable-free vr headsets like the oculus go in the 2019-2020 timeframe so both an increase in the supply of this or competing services as well as the inexorable march in price-performance of internet connections will make the service even more usable than it is today. And today I’m hearing from YouTube reviewers that’s latency isn’t a problem.

 

I game 4 hours a day. So 4 X 365 days in a year and we are already looking at 1440 hours. 1440 /20 = 72. 72 X $25 = $1800 a year, which is more than I paid for my gaming PC. And that is only for one year. I expect to get 5 years out of this PC, which means this service is more than 5 times as expensive. Mind you, going the PC route, you've still got to get games ( but many people who purchase a gaming PC do so with the intention of finding ways around game purchases. Wink Wink)



#951
eacao

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Heavy users such as yourself may find it more economical to own your own gaming PC. But most people don't game 4 hours per day. 

 

Primary point of importance isn't whether it's competitively priced today. What's important is that this absolves people looking to get into VR from having to purchase their own high-end hardware. They can use their laptops to run VR, or if headsets are wifi enabled, connect directly to a hosted virtual machine running on high-end hardware. 


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#952
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Thanks for the posts, eacao. That's some really incredible news. I find it kind of bizarre that it's been around for so long and yet I've never heard it mentioned anywhere at any point, not even at UploadVR or RoadtoVR. This is some incredibly fundamental, game-changing stuff.

 

And yeah, gates, I think you're basically the exception that proves the rule. (Videogames are great, though, I'm playing through FFX-2 now) The price also will likely go down as time goes along, and the technology improves along the VR userbase becoming bigger. Maybe by 2020 the fee will be a flat $10 a month, and then by 2022 a small start-up will have arisen that offers its services for free and subsides on donations and advertisements.

 

I haven't used VR much this year because my only headset is the Gear VR, and the Samsung Galaxy S6 has the completely terrible design choice of having no SD cards, and I eventually got tired of having to free up some space every time I want to download a new app. Once I upgrade my phone in March, though, I plan to start using VR more regularly again. I've also been planning on getting an Oculus Go since it was first announced thanks to the price tag (I don't make enough money for me to be willing to go for the Rift, Vive, or PSVR yet), but this news means that I can get far more use out of the thing than I realized.

 

I think the tenor surrounding VR might become more positive during 2018 than it was during 2016 or 2017 (which have been "Videogame Crash of 1983" levels of negative, hence why I stay away from VR discussions). Between Oculus Go bringing the all-in price to $200 rather than $1200-ish (Oculus Rift + PC) or $800-ish (Gear VR + phone, PS4 + PSVR), GeForce and services like it making price much less of an issue, as well as Oculus and other companies giving information regarding the second generation of headsets, I expect the climate surrounding VR to become a lot more positive.


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#953
bgates276

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Yeah, well, if they could provide a service that was only $10/month flat rate, I think that might be a viable option. I'd even be willing to watch in game advertisements if the service were otherwise free. I mean, I think streaming services like Youtube and Netflix have taken a large market share away from traditional media, so I guess the same could possibly happen for games. Half the advertisements I get on youtube barely register in my brain, so I probably would hardly notice anyways.

 

Thinking about this further though, I don't know how they could reduce the price by too much. If the goal is to provide games with top level graphics through streaming services to a really large number of people, it's going to take literally super computers on their end to run them. The costs of running high end hardware will likely be passed on to the consumer anyways.  

 

Perhaps you've heard that Google doesn't actually make a profit off of youtube. If this were to work at a low price (or even better, for free), it would have to be done by some giant company that could eat up the costs somehow. 



#954
Alislaws

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If it takes off, the economies of scale and the continual fall in the cost of cloud computing power should mean the price gets more competitive over time. 

 

Of course as soon as enough people start using it, game developers will realise their games can now be hugely more demanding than when everyone had to buy their own PC so then prices may climb again. 

 

Games will be able to become absolutely mind-blowing though. 


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#955
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Continental’s new head-up display moves a step closer to providing an augmented view ahead

November 17th, 2017

 

Ford's Lincoln division is the first automotive manufacturer to put Continental's new Digital Micromirror Device head-up display (HUD) technology into production. By projecting symbolic representations of objects ahead of the vehicle, it moves a step closer to Continental's goal of offering augmented reality HUD.

Studies by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute have consistently found that the chance of a crash or near crash more than double when a driver takes his or her eyes off the road ahead. HUD technology can reduce the need to look away by displaying selected information in the driver's line of sight.

 

https://newatlas.com...-display/52225/


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#956
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As wildfires raged, the Forest Service was capturing the immensity in VR
By Daven Mathies — Posted on November 19, 2017 9:00 am

 

The United States Forest Service can trace its roots back to the 19th century, and since then, it has grown to manage over 190 million acres of public land. That includes 154 National Forests and 20 National Grasslands, all of it managed in a way that attracts little public attention. A bold new campaign, called Your Forests Your Future, is looking to change that.

But how does a century-plus-old agency — created in a time where the “Wild Wild West” still existed — reach a new generation of visitors, especially those living in the digital age? Through a media-rich online experience that makes use of the latest in storytelling technology that includes virtual reality — and by hiring a pair of filmmakers known for their previous work producing content for public lands: Will and Jim Pattiz, the brothers behind the viral More Than Just Parks series.

 

https://www.digitalt...ts-your-future/


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#957
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Holograms Come to Life in the World’s First Interactive Lightfield Display

 

In Brief The first-ever interactive lightfield display has been unveiled by Looking Glass, a unique team of innovators. This compact device allows you to actually interact with the holograms it creates.

The world's first interactive hologram has been released...again? Don't we already have these? Maybe I'm getting mixed up. Hard to keep track these days with progress being the way it is!


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#958
Yuli Ban

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"The world's first" is a common slogan used by things when the product field is relatively new because "second place" is synonymous with "first loser" in competitive circles. I still see social robots being advertised as "the world's first robot for the home", despite the fact that domestic robots have been around since the early '80s (though, admittedly, they were Japanese and are obscure even there).


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#959
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VR industry showing solid gains over 2016



#960
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VR headsets sell 1,000,000 copies in one quarter for the first time during Q3 2017, VR boom expected in 2018


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: virtual reality, augmented reality, Oculus Rift, smart glasses, mixed reality, Gear VR, holograms, holographic screen, hologram, VR

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