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#781
wjfox

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Millennials aren't satisfied with capitalism — and might prefer a socialist country, studies find

November 04, 2017

Ask a millennial if they would rather live under a socialist or capitalist country, and they’re likely to give an answer much different than their parents or grandparents would.

That’s according to a new YouGov study commissioned by the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, an anti-communist organization, which found that 44 percent of millennials would prefer to live in a socialist country, with another 7 percent saying the same about communism.

Meanwhile, just 42 percent of millennials said they would choose to live in a capitalistic country like the United States, according to the survey of 2,000 people.

Overall, according to the survey, 59 percent of American adults would rather live in a capitalist country than a socialist one. And among Baby Boomers, only 26 percent would want to live in a socialist country, showing a generational divide between the young and old.

Read more: http://www.sacbee.co...e182765121.html


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#782
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Millennials aren't satisfied with capitalism — and might prefer a socialist country, studies find

 

I have to wonder how many of those same millennials also understand that socialism is supposed to precede communism which is supposed to evolve into an anarchic utopia of sorts, and if they even understand what those terms mean. I have a feeling these most of these youths probably think socialism is just universal healthcare and whatnot based on what they see European socially democratic capitalist countries doing.


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#783
bgates276

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A lot of these Millenials are college age right now, and are hearing in academia how wonderful socialism is. To them, all they really see is the 'free stuff' being dangled in front of them to get their votes, and arn't thinking 20-30 years down the road. Meanwhile, the mainstream media is totally ignoring what is happening in Venezuela. I'm also not sure this new generation has been warned like previous generations, about the potential dangers of a communist regime. I remember when I was a student, reading books like 1984 and Animal Farm. I wonder if it is still part of any curriculum.  


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#784
Cody930

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Lol don't think I ever heard one of my professors boast about socialism. Granted I went into a science but even the plethora of "liberal arts" courses I took, none of this was discussed which leads me to believe this notion of a "leftist" academia is a lot more isolated than is led on (select colleges and even then, select courses and professors), especially when the media cries about that one professor. If anything, I was actually more of a libertarian through my years at Rutgers.

I never read 1984 in high school but I did read Animal Farm, it still is part of curriculum's but unfortunately they're taught in ways George Orwell likely didn't intend on. 


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"Since we first emerged, a few million years ago in East Africa, we have meandered our way around the planet. There are now people on every continent and the remotest islands, from pole to pole, from Mount Everest to the Dead Sea, on the ocean bottoms and even, occasionally, in residence 200 miles up - humans, like the gods of old, living in the sky."


#785
bgates276

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Lol don't think I ever heard one of my professors boast about socialism. Granted I went into a science but even the plethora of "liberal arts" courses I took, none of this was discussed which leads me to believe this notion of a "leftist" academia is a lot more isolated than is led on (select colleges and even then, select courses and professors), especially when the media cries about that one professor. If anything, I was actually more of a libertarian through my years at Rutgers.

I never read 1984 in high school but I did read Animal Farm, it still is part of curriculum's but unfortunately they're taught in ways George Orwell likely didn't intend on. 

 

 

How long ago did you attend? And yeah, the fact that it was a science degree matters. Not much room for subjectivity in that. When I originally went to university myself, from 1998 to 2003, majoring in an arts discipline, it wasn't that bad either. However, I went back to school in 2011 to complete a bachelor of education, and the whole thing was very social justice oriented. I often thought to myself, 'what exactly does this have to do with becoming a teacher?' As of last year, you can now complete a graduate degree in Social Justice Education (Yes, that is the name of the degree), through the department. This is no second rate school either. We are talking about the University of Toronto. ( The best school in Canada, ranked 31st in the world) 



#786
Jakob

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Millennials aren't satisfied with capitalism — and might prefer a socialist country, studies find

November 04, 2017

Ask a millennial if they would rather live under a socialist or capitalist country, and they’re likely to give an answer much different than their parents or grandparents would.

That’s according to a new YouGov study commissioned by the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, an anti-communist organization, which found that 44 percent of millennials would prefer to live in a socialist country, with another 7 percent saying the same about communism.

Meanwhile, just 42 percent of millennials said they would choose to live in a capitalistic country like the United States, according to the survey of 2,000 people.

Overall, according to the survey, 59 percent of American adults would rather live in a capitalist country than a socialist one. And among Baby Boomers, only 26 percent would want to live in a socialist country, showing a generational divide between the young and old.

Read more: http://www.sacbee.co...e182765121.html

Let's see if they prefer living in a socialist country after they spend a few years of having everything they own ripped away from them, being government-owned slaves on a collective farm, spending hours standing in bread lines, and being sent to prison or executed with anti-aircraft guns if they dare to complain about being "triggered" or needing a "safe space".


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#787
Raklian

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Millennials aren't satisfied with capitalism — and might prefer a socialist country, studies find

November 04, 2017

Ask a millennial if they would rather live under a socialist or capitalist country, and they’re likely to give an answer much different than their parents or grandparents would.

That’s according to a new YouGov study commissioned by the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation, an anti-communist organization, which found that 44 percent of millennials would prefer to live in a socialist country, with another 7 percent saying the same about communism.

Meanwhile, just 42 percent of millennials said they would choose to live in a capitalistic country like the United States, according to the survey of 2,000 people.

Overall, according to the survey, 59 percent of American adults would rather live in a capitalist country than a socialist one. And among Baby Boomers, only 26 percent would want to live in a socialist country, showing a generational divide between the young and old.

Read more: http://www.sacbee.co...e182765121.html

Let's see if they prefer living in a socialist country after they spend a few years of having everything they own ripped away from them, being government-owned slaves on a collective farm, spending hours standing in bread lines, and being sent to prison or executed with anti-aircraft guns if they dare to complain about being "triggered" or needing a "safe space".

 

 

Perhaps they're actually thinking about a socially democratic system? Often times people conflate socialism with social democracy due to a lack of understanding what differentiates both.

 

People mistaken Scandinavian countries for being socialist when they're actually socially democratic.

 

Venezuela - now that is socialist. 


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#788
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And jakob certainly doesn't know the difference. I want western Europe social democracy! They have the highest gdp per capital on earth and we'd be better off.

 

He thinks everything is communism...Well, communism doesn't allow for a private sector or free elections. Look at the USSR or cuba for some examples.

 

Social democracies trend to have far more political freedom compared to what we have. ;) Germany, New Zealand, and other such countries have many parties in government.


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#789
bgates276

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It seems like one is just a gradation of another: democracy --- > social democracy --- > socialism --- > communism, and that one will eventually slide into another. Socrates, in Plato's The Republic, talks about how this type of transition occurs from the ideal government to one of tyranny, over successive generations. He actually puts democracy as the second worst possible kind, only above tyranny. It may seem like good times now, because of all the freedom we have, but that very freedom, 'equality', and looseness, leads society vulnerable to a take over and dictatorship. 



#790
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Lol don't think I ever heard one of my professors boast about socialism. Granted I went into a science but even the plethora of "liberal arts" courses I took, none of this was discussed which leads me to believe this notion of a "leftist" academia is a lot more isolated than is led on (select colleges and even then, select courses and professors), especially when the media cries about that one professor. If anything, I was actually more of a libertarian through my years at Rutgers.
I never read 1984 in high school but I did read Animal Farm, it still is part of curriculum's but unfortunately they're taught in ways George Orwell likely didn't intend on.

 
 
How long ago did you attend? And yeah, the fact that it was a science degree matters. Not much room for subjectivity in that. When I originally went to university myself, from 1998 to 2003, majoring in an arts discipline, it wasn't that bad either. However, I went back to school in 2011 to complete a bachelor of education, and the whole thing was very social justice oriented. I often thought to myself, 'what exactly does this have to do with becoming a teacher?' As of last year, you can now complete a graduate degree in Social Justice Education (Yes, that is the name of the degree), through the department. This is no second rate school either. We are talking about the University of Toronto. ( The best school in Canada, ranked 31st in the world)

2011-2015. Never heard professors preaching leftism or saw any 'safe spaces' for that matter. As far as the social justice degree stuff, never heard of this until now. I imagine this became an outgrowth of diversity training. Indeed, some are taking this too far but I just never saw this being some massive thing the media blows it up to be be.
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"Since we first emerged, a few million years ago in East Africa, we have meandered our way around the planet. There are now people on every continent and the remotest islands, from pole to pole, from Mount Everest to the Dead Sea, on the ocean bottoms and even, occasionally, in residence 200 miles up - humans, like the gods of old, living in the sky."


#791
Erowind

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There's a lot of ignorance floating around this thread right now so I'm going to objectively clarify some things without pointing fingers.

 

  • George Orwell was a socialist, he even traveled to Catalonia during the Spanish Civil war to support the republicans. His experiences there convinced him that authoritarian-state socialism was dangerous--and it is. Depending on which historian you ask the USSR could easily be blamed for letting fascists gain dominance over Spain all the while suppressing the non-authoritarian socialists in Spain. Orwell would probably be pretty upset to see his books used by capitalist countries as leverage against socialism.
  • The USSR was not a communist country, it was a state socialist--or in other words state capitalist--nation. The general theory of communism is that capitalism naturally degrades and leads to revolution--this can be sudden or gradual--which instills a form of socialism. From there that socialism evolves into an anarchic communist society. There are two camps of socialists in the world for the most part, the statists and the anarchists. Statists think that they can use the state to force socialism and that somehow this socialist society will naturally rid itself of the state over time--hint, it doesn't, and this is objectively provable. The anarchists think that a social revolution is needed in that we can completely skip socialism entirely and jump straight into communism. Every time this has started to happen foreign capitalist countries invade the revolutionary territory, we don't know if it works yet due to external interference. The USSR was trying to attain communism but failed miserably. Reminder, the USSR stands for United Socialist Soviet Republics and the communist party only called themselves communists because communism was their end game, which they never reached.

 

There seems to be an ontological bias that appears on this forum a lot. Someone criticizes all socialism or communism and uses the USSR as an example. In some cases they display clear manipulation from historical government propaganda that still lingers in western collective thought--this propaganda is factual, the cold war happened and you are still likely manipulated by it. Then I chime in and explain what communism and socialism actually are, while also condemning the Soviets as failures, and am largely ignored or forgotten. The point being, leverage a criticism not based in propaganda and stop generalizing that all socialism or communism equates to the USSR especially when the USSR never attained a state of communism to begin with.

 

 

 

Communism

 


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#792
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Think of another system apart from Capitalism, what is the first that comes to mind? 

It's not that millennials are pro-socialism, it's more that they are fed up of Capitalism, and who can blame them? We pretend it's normal when it is far from it, we say it's normal that companies lobby the government to get tax breaks and justify it by saying trickle down works, when it does not (and then boost their bonuses while raising prices). We say it's normal that the cost of owning a house is out of reach of the majority of the population. 

 

The youth do not favour Socialism, they favour anything that isn't Capitalism.

 

 

With the rate technology is going, we may see more and more proponents of FALC as well. 


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“If the genius of invention were to reveal to-morrow the secret of immortality, of eternal beauty and youth, for which all humanity is aching, the same inexorable agents which prevent a mass from changing suddenly its velocity would likewise resist the force of the new knowledge until time gradually modifies human thought.” 

 

                                                                 Nikola Tesla - New York World, May 19th 1907 


#793
Raklian

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Think of another system apart from Capitalism, what is the first that comes to mind? 

It's not that millennials are pro-socialism, it's more that they are fed up of Capitalism, and who can blame them? We pretend it's normal when it is far from it, we say it's normal that companies lobby the government to get tax breaks and justify it by saying trickle down works, when it does not (and then boost their bonuses while raising prices). We say it's normal that the cost of owning a house is out of reach of the majority of the population. 

 

The youth do not favour Socialism, they favour anything that isn't Capitalism.

 

 

With the rate technology is going, we may see more and more proponents of FALC as well. 

 

I would say it's part of the reason it's mainly the younger generation that supports the basic income movement. Basic income is the gateway towards a world they want to happily exist in.


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#794
rennerpetey

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A lot of these Millenials are college age right now, and are hearing in academia how wonderful socialism is. To them, all they really see is the 'free stuff' being dangled in front of them to get their votes, and arn't thinking 20-30 years down the road. Meanwhile, the mainstream media is totally ignoring what is happening in Venezuela. I'm also not sure this new generation has been warned like previous generations, about the potential dangers of a communist regime. I remember when I was a student, reading books like 1984 and Animal Farm. I wonder if it is still part of any curriculum.  

I go to a public school in Indiana and read Animal Farm last year (High School Freshman) in my English class, and I know that the seniors read 1984 a few weeks ago in their English classes.


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#795
Alislaws

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It seems like one is just a gradation of another: democracy --- > social democracy --- > socialism --- > communism, and that one will eventually slide into another. Socrates, in Plato's The Republic, talks about how this type of transition occurs from the ideal government to one of tyranny, over successive generations. He actually puts democracy as the second worst possible kind, only above tyranny. It may seem like good times now, because of all the freedom we have, but that very freedom, 'equality', and looseness, leads society vulnerable to a take over and dictatorship. 

 

 

Where is fascism on this spectrum? Also communism is an economic system (like capitalism) while democracy is a political system so how does the line go from talking about who controls the state, to talking about who controls the means of production?

 

Also why would one eventually slide into the other? I don't think history has shown that this is the case. 


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#796
Sciencerocks

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Fake news is only the beginning. The FCC is about to let monopolies decide what local news you see
http://www.mcclatchy...e183246581.html

Fake news is only the beginning. The FCC is about to let monopolies decide what local news you see

By Sue Wilson

Special to McClatchy

November 07, 2017 2:56 PM

What would happen if the politician you love to hate was indicted, but your local news didn’t report it? No newspaper stories, no TV news, no radio news on the hour, nothing.

Couldn’t happen? Think again.

The Republican-controlled Federal Communications Commission will vote Nov. 16 to allow just one corporation to own the local newspaper plus every commercial TV station in your town. Nifty way to reduce down to just one newsroom then dictate whatever information that corporation does – and does not – want you to know in this democracy.

This is a watershed moment. Ten years from now, people could look at their local news reporting and wonder how it ever went so wrong.

It’s exactly what’s happened with radio. Back in the day when lots of companies owned 40 radio stations, the broadcast industry made big promises that local information would be much more diverse if they could simply own many more stations. The 1996 Telecommunications Act resulted in a handful of corporations owning thousands of stations – and force feeding conservative programming down our country’s throats ever since, no debate, no opposing opinions allowed.

The Media Action Center showed during the Scott Walker recall in Wisconsin that “conservative” radio giants there gave millions of dollars in free airtime to the GOP candidate – while refusing to allow a single Democrat on the air at all. GOP operatives there still gloat about radio winning elections for them. After 21 years of this kind of divisive public policy, 60 million people listen to conservative radio, about the same number that voted for Donald Trump.

Now the FCC is quietly trying to do the same thing to our local TV stations. In 2003, when they just tried to allow TV stations to own newspapers, 3 million people rose up and said “No!” Now they want to allow the newspapers plus all the TV stations in one town to have the same owner, and they’re not even asking for public comment.

more...

 

http://www.mcclatchy...e183246581.html


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#797
Jakob

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#798
DanTheMan

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Aging Japan Wants Automation, Not Immigration

Japan's next boom may be at hand, driven by the very thing that is supposed to be bad for its economy. 
Japan's aging and shrinking population has been partly blamed for the on-again, off-again nature of growth and deflation the past three decades. Lately, it's been driving a different and just as powerful idea: In the absence of large-scale immigration, the only viable solution for many domestic industries is to plow money into robots and information technology more generally.
Humans will still be needed, of course, and that's behind a separate by-product of Japan's demographic challenges that I wrote about during a visit there last month. With unemployment down to 2.8 percent, companies are increasingly realizing they need to pay up to attract and keep qualified personnel. The other option -- increased immigration -- is politically difficult.

What else did you expect from such a conservative, monoethnic society?

 

Yeah, it's almost like they don't want to embrace cultural/demographic suicide! Shock horror. 



#799
Sciencerocks

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Aging Japan Wants Automation, Not Immigration

Japan's next boom may be at hand, driven by the very thing that is supposed to be bad for its economy. 
Japan's aging and shrinking population has been partly blamed for the on-again, off-again nature of growth and deflation the past three decades. Lately, it's been driving a different and just as powerful idea: In the absence of large-scale immigration, the only viable solution for many domestic industries is to plow money into robots and information technology more generally.
Humans will still be needed, of course, and that's behind a separate by-product of Japan's demographic challenges that I wrote about during a visit there last month. With unemployment down to 2.8 percent, companies are increasingly realizing they need to pay up to attract and keep qualified personnel. The other option -- increased immigration -- is politically difficult.

What else did you expect from such a conservative, monoethnic society?

 

Yeah, it's almost like they don't want to embrace cultural/demographic suicide! Shock horror. 

 

 

 

Maybe they should have some more babies? That is quite the idea, right?


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#800
Sciencerocks

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Aging Japan Wants Automation, Not Immigration

Japan's next boom may be at hand, driven by the very thing that is supposed to be bad for its economy. 
Japan's aging and shrinking population has been partly blamed for the on-again, off-again nature of growth and deflation the past three decades. Lately, it's been driving a different and just as powerful idea: In the absence of large-scale immigration, the only viable solution for many domestic industries is to plow money into robots and information technology more generally.
Humans will still be needed, of course, and that's behind a separate by-product of Japan's demographic challenges that I wrote about during a visit there last month. With unemployment down to 2.8 percent, companies are increasingly realizing they need to pay up to attract and keep qualified personnel. The other option -- increased immigration -- is politically difficult.

What else did you expect from such a conservative, monoethnic society?

 

Yeah, it's almost like they don't want to embrace cultural/demographic suicide! Shock horror. 

 

 

 

Maybe they should have some more babies? That is quite the idea, right?


To follow my work on tropical cyclones






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