Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

These ads will disappear if you register on the forum

Photo

Climate shifts 'hit global wheat yields'


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1
Time_Traveller

Time_Traveller

    Master of Time Travel

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,066 posts
  • LocationRepublic of Jordan, 1 January 3025 C.E.

Shifts in the climate over the past three decades have been linked to a 5.5% decline in global wheat production, a study has suggested.



Posted Image

From BBC News

I would say we would have less of those types of food in the future due to climate change, What do members think?
I want to go ahead of Father Time with a scythe of my own.

H. G. Wells

#2
wizzard

wizzard

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
I believe we already import a lot of wheat. There was a program about it last year, we as a nation are suffering from a lack of selenium in our diets because quite a lot of wheat is coming from Cnada which doesn't have selenium in it.

#3
Nom du Clavier

Nom du Clavier

    Brain in a body-shaped jar

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 171 posts
  • Location/dev/random

I believe we already import a lot of wheat. There was a program about it last year, we as a nation are suffering from a lack of selenium in our diets because quite a lot of wheat is coming from Cnada which doesn't have selenium in it.


And drinking anti-dandruff shampoo for the Selenium isn't much of an option. It's interesting that you can tell by someone's molars where they lived most of their life because of trace amounts of various isotopes being different in the soil.

I wonder however how much of the dearth of wheat in the UK is due to tariffs and subsidies having caused farmers to grow different crops, and how much of it is actually due to climate shift.

(For the record, I'm not one of those people arguing against climate change in face of overwhelming evidence - particularly with record drought in the NL at the moment and my airco running pretty much the entire day just to keep sane.)
This amount of awesome cannot be from concentrate.

#4
OrbitalResonance

OrbitalResonance

    Cosmic Emperor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,224 posts
  • LocationDeep Space
Farming the same crops over and over again may not be doing to soils any favor as well. Soils in natural biospheres get humus from a diversity of plant matter. I wonder how massive farmlands like in the midwest will react to hundreds of years of intense farming. Modern farming takes the soils nutrients and distributes them throughout a continent via shipping. The nutrients are then discarded. More sewage should be converted into compost fertilizer.

We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers. - Carl Sagan





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users