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308 replies to this topic

#1
wjfox

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China is set to build a particle collider twice the circumference of the LHC

CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is by far the biggest particle collider in the world–it even has “large” in the name. However, the now famous scientific instrument buried near Geneva, Switzerland may soon be eclipsed by an even bigger collider currently being planned in China. The plan from scientists at the Institute of High Energy Physics in Beijing calls for a ring-shaped collider nearly twice the size of the LHC.

[...]

Construction could start within the next five years, even if no other country pledges to help. The collider could be operational as soon as 2028.

http://www.geek.com/...he-lhc-1600132/

 

 

collider-590x330.jpg


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#2
Mike the average

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Bah this is as bad as schrodingers cat

The pigeonhole principle

'The pigeonhole principle: "If you put three pigeons in two pigeonholes at least two of the pigeons end up in the same hole." So where's the argument? Physicists say there is an important argument. While the principle captures the very essence of counting, the investigators said that they showed that in quantum mechanics it is not true'

Read more at: http://phys.org/news...nciple.html#jCp
'Force always attracts men of low morality' - Einstein
'Great spirits always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds' - Einstein

#3
MarcZ

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Japanese scientists create the strongest electrical current in the world at 100,000 amperes.

 

https://uk.news.yaho...80.html#keSKNHD

 

This has implications for the design of future reactors as strong currents/magnetic fields will be needed to assure plasma does not touch the reactor's walls.



#4
wjfox

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This is amazing, and a little scary.

Huge implications for privacy and security in the future...

 

 

 



#5
Yuli Ban

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Something Strange About Superconductivity Isn't So Strange After All
http://www.futurity....rsenide-742262/

Thanks to new findings, the electronic properties of the iron-based, high-temperature superconductor barium iron nickel arsenide are somewhat less baffling.

Scientists report the first evidence of a link between magnetic properties and the material’s tendency, at sufficiently low temperatures, to become a better conductor of electricity in some directions than in others.


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#6
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Is Hemp Better than Graphene?

It seems that some hemp products is good at storing electricity. Finally, a useful application for this plant.


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#7
TheAsianGuy_LOL

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Scientists create Solid Light

Now this is amazing. Also, update this area as well, as it seems no one bothers to do something with it.


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#8
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Here's what atoms sound like.


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#9
MarcZ

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Physicists make jump in knowledge about quantum teleportation

 

http://www.businessi...ortation-2014-9



#10
Mike the average

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blue diode maker wins nobel prize for Physics, i didn't even realise it was a problem,

http://www.bloomberg...sics-prize.html
'Force always attracts men of low morality' - Einstein
'Great spirits always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds' - Einstein

#11
Yuli Ban

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Twisting radio beams to transmit ultra-high-speed data
Transmissions reach speeds of 32 gigabits per second
 
twisted-light.jpg
A graphic showing the intensity of the radio beams after twisting (credit: Alan Willner / USC Viterbi)
 



Building on previous research using twisted light to send data at unheard-of speeds, scientists at USC have developed a similar technique with radio waves, reaching high speeds without the problems with optical systems.

The researchers, led by electrical engineering professor Alan Willner of the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, reached data transmission rates of 32 gigabits per second across 2.5 meters of free space in a lab — “one of the fastest data transmission via radio waves that has been demonstrated,” Willner said.

(For reference, 32 gigabits per second is fast enough to transmit more than 10 hour-and-a-half-long HD movies in one second and is 30 times faster than LTE wireless.)

Faster data transmission rates have been achieved. Willner’s team two years ago used twisted light beams to transmit data at 2.56 terabits per second. “The advantage of radio is that it uses wider, more robust beams,” he said. “Wider beams are better able to cope with obstacles between the transmitter and the receiver, and radio is not as affected by atmospheric turbulence as optics.”


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Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#12
Yuli Ban

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First Teleportation Of Multiple Quantum Properties Of A Single Photon
 


Back in 1997, physicists performed an extraordinary experiment that will be forever remembered by researchers and Star Trek fans alike. In this demonstration, the team transported photons from one point in the universe to another without sending them through the space in between — the first successful teleportation in history.

Teleportation is the transfer of the information that describes one object to another object elsewhere in space. In effect, this second object takes on the identity of the first. A more precise description of the team’s experiment with photons is that they transferred the quantum information that describes the polarisation state of one photon to another photon.

Still impressive but not quite the teleportation of the entire photon, which has multiple quantum properties. All of these need to be teleported to recreate it exactly.

Since then, this kind of teleportation has become routine in quantum optics labs all over the world but always with the same limitation. All these experiments involve the transfer of a single quantum property. Nobody has ever found a way to transmit the multiple quantum properties of a single object at the same time and thereby truly teleport it.

Until now. Today, Xi-Lin Wang and buddies at the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei say they have done just that. The team have worked out how to teleport two quantum properties of a single photon to another photon at the same time — the first time this has ever been done. The work is an important stepping stone towards the ultimate goal of teleporting complex objects such as atoms and small molecules in their entirety.


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#13
wjfox

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Physicists build reversible tractor beam

Laser physicists have built a tractor beam that can repel and attract objects, using a hollow laser beam that is bright around the edges and dark in its centre.

It is the first long-distance optical tractor beam and moved particles one fifth of a millimetre in diameter a distance of up to 20 centimetres, around 100 times further than previous experiments.

“Demonstration of a large scale laser beam like this is a kind of holy grail for laser physicists,” said Professor Wieslaw Krolikowski, from the Research School of Physics and Engineering.

http://news.anu.edu....e-tractor-beam/


AH1P8019-440x295.jpg


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#14
Jakob

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First Teleportation Of Multiple Quantum Properties Of A Single Photon
 


Back in 1997, physicists performed an extraordinary experiment that will be forever remembered by researchers and Star Trek fans alike. In this demonstration, the team transported photons from one point in the universe to another without sending them through the space in between — the first successful teleportation in history.

Teleportation is the transfer of the information that describes one object to another object elsewhere in space. In effect, this second object takes on the identity of the first. A more precise description of the team’s experiment with photons is that they transferred the quantum information that describes the polarisation state of one photon to another photon.

Still impressive but not quite the teleportation of the entire photon, which has multiple quantum properties. All of these need to be teleported to recreate it exactly.

Since then, this kind of teleportation has become routine in quantum optics labs all over the world but always with the same limitation. All these experiments involve the transfer of a single quantum property. Nobody has ever found a way to transmit the multiple quantum properties of a single object at the same time and thereby truly teleport it.

Until now. Today, Xi-Lin Wang and buddies at the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei say they have done just that. The team have worked out how to teleport two quantum properties of a single photon to another photon at the same time — the first time this has ever been done. The work is an important stepping stone towards the ultimate goal of teleporting complex objects such as atoms and small molecules in their entirety.

 

I am confused. Is quantum teleportation the kind of teleportation that gets a person from A to B instantaneously, or isn't it?


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#15
tornado64

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First Teleportation Of Multiple Quantum Properties Of A Single Photon
 


Back in 1997, physicists performed an extraordinary experiment that will be forever remembered by researchers and Star Trek fans alike. In this demonstration, the team transported photons from one point in the universe to another without sending them through the space in between — the first successful teleportation in history.

Teleportation is the transfer of the information that describes one object to another object elsewhere in space. In effect, this second object takes on the identity of the first. A more precise description of the team’s experiment with photons is that they transferred the quantum information that describes the polarisation state of one photon to another photon.

Still impressive but not quite the teleportation of the entire photon, which has multiple quantum properties. All of these need to be teleported to recreate it exactly.

Since then, this kind of teleportation has become routine in quantum optics labs all over the world but always with the same limitation. All these experiments involve the transfer of a single quantum property. Nobody has ever found a way to transmit the multiple quantum properties of a single object at the same time and thereby truly teleport it.

Until now. Today, Xi-Lin Wang and buddies at the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei say they have done just that. The team have worked out how to teleport two quantum properties of a single photon to another photon at the same time — the first time this has ever been done. The work is an important stepping stone towards the ultimate goal of teleporting complex objects such as atoms and small molecules in their entirety.

 

I am confused. Is quantum teleportation the kind of teleportation that gets a person from A to B instantaneously, or isn't it?

 

 

It isn't, it's only possible to teleport quantum information, but you still need classical information exchange at lightspeed. You can only teleport qbits, not bits (which would be needed to teleport information or matter)



#16
Kafeel

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Without a doubt there is only one man who has the answers when it comes to physics in my opinion. Do you know who it is? No. It is the man himself Professor Brian Cox, he takes physics to another level 


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#17
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http://www.scienceda...41030101654.htm

 

alternate realities might be interacting with our reality, scientist speculate.


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#18
Ru1138

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How Gravity Explains Why Time Never Runs Backward

 

We can’t avoid the passing of time, even at the DMV, where time seems to come to a standstill. And daylight savings notwithstanding, time always ticks forward. But why not backward? Why do we remember the past and not the future? For a group of physicists, the answers to these deep and complex questions may arise from a familiar source: gravity.

 

Even though time is such a fundamental part of our experience, the basic laws of physics don’t seem to care in which direction it goes. For example, the rules that govern the orbits of planets work the same whether you go forward or backward in time. You can play the motions of the solar system in reverse and they look completely normal; they don’t violate any laws of physics. So what distinguishes the future from the past?


What difference does it make?


#19
Ru1138

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Black Hole Challenge To Einstein's Theory

 

Structural changes to the Milky Way’s super-massive black hole have been detected as it emitted a blaze of electromagnetic energy, an observation that could lead to a profound rethinking of physics.

 

The images of the singularity at the core of our galaxy (called Sagittarius A*, abbreviated SgrA* and pronounced “Saj-A-Star”), have implications for Einstein’s theory of general relativity and the dark matter and dark energy thought to make up 95 per cent of the universe.


What difference does it make?


#20
Ru1138

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Maybe it wasn't the Higgs particle after all

 

Last year CERN announced the finding of a new elementary particle, the Higgs particle. But maybe it wasn't the Higgs particle, maybe it just looks like it. And maybe it is not alone.

 

Many calculations indicate that the particle discovered last year in the CERN particle accelerator was indeed the famous Higgs particle. Physicists agree that the CERN experiments did find a new particle that had never been seen before, but according to an international research team, there is no conclusive evidence that the particle was indeed the Higgs particle.


What difference does it make?






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: physics, quantum physics, general relativity, science, cosmology, astrophysics, super collider, CERN, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics

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