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#21
Ru1138

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Why a Physics Revolution Might Be on Its Way
 


The field of physics may be turned on its head soon, said renowned physicist Nima Arkani-Hamed during a live lecture from the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada.
 
For one, he said, the tried and true physics of relativity and quantum mechanics don't get along well. The problem is that in some sense, the principles behind these theories seem to be impossible when physicists dig a little deeper into them, Arkani-Hamed said. Scientists run into a lot of problems when they try to apply these theories to the entirety of space and time.


Woo hoo!


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#22
Yuli Ban

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Time cloak used to hide messages in laser light
 


A "time cloak" that conceals events rather than objects can hide secret messages through a trick of light, making information invisible to all but the intended recipient.

Like an invisibility cloak that makes something disappear in plain sight, a time cloak makes an event disappear in time. It works by manipulating light traveling along an optical fibre.

 

dn26627-1_300.jpg


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#23
Ru1138

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New Cosmological Theory Goes Inflation-Free

 

The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is one of the greatest discoveries of modern cosmology. Astrophysicist George Smoot once likened its existence to “seeing the face of God.” In recent years, however, scientists have begun to question some of the attributes of the CMB. Peculiar patterns have emerged in the images taken by satellites such as WMAP and Planck – and they aren’t going away. Now, in a paper published in the December 1 issue of The Astronomical Journal, one scientist argues that the existence of these patterns may not only imply new physics, but also a revolution in our understanding of the entire Universe.

 

Let’s recap. Thanks to a blistering ambient temperature, the early Universe was blanketed in a haze for its first 380,000 years of life. During this time, photons relentlessly bombarded the protons and electrons created in the Big Bang, preventing them from combining to form stable atoms. All of this scattering also caused the photons’ energy to manifest as a diffuse glow. The CMB that cosmologists see today is the relic of this glow, now stretched to longer, microwave wavelengths due to the expansion of the Universe.


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#24
Ru1138

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LHC finds new baryons

 

Using the same massive particle accelerator that found the elusive Higgs Boson in 2012, physicists at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) announced that they discovered two new "heavy-weight" subatomic particles on Wednesday.

 

The LHC is a 17-mile long underground “racetrack” that accelerates two opposing beams of particles to speeds of 99.9999 percent the speed of light. The particles race around the LHC on a crash course, and when they collide, the temperatures soar to more than 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sun. At heats this extreme, the particles transform into a primordial form of matter known–in not-quite-technical terms–as a “subatomic soup.”


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#25
wjfox

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Top 10 physics breakthroughs listed

Landing on a comet, nuclear fusion with lasers and a tractor beam are among the 10 physics breakthroughs of 2014, as chosen by a leading science magazine.

The Philae spacecraft's touchdown on comet 67P was named as the year's most significant advance by Physics World.

It was singled out for its "fundamental importance to space science".

Read more: http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-30415007


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#26
Sciencerocks

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2014 was a good year for physics. Fusion took a huge step!


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#27
Jakob

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The National Ignition Facility managed to get more energy out of fusion than was absorbed by the fuel

So nuclear fusion is now a reality?


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#28
Ru1138

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So nuclear fusion is now a reality?


Well, now we have to do it consistently. A few kilowatts for a fraction of a second isn't useful for the power grid. :p


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#29
Ru1138

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Have We Been Interpreting Quantum Mechanics Wrong This Whole Time?

 

For nearly a century, “reality” has been a murky concept. The laws of quantum physics seem to suggest that particles spend much of their time in a ghostly state, lacking even basic properties such as a definite location and instead existing everywhere and nowhere at once. Only when a particle is measured does it suddenly materialize, appearing to pick its position as if by a roll of the dice.

 

This idea that nature is inherently probabilistic — that particles have no hard properties, only likelihoods, until they are observed — is directly implied by the standard equations of quantum mechanics. But now a set of surprising experiments with fluids has revived old skepticism about that worldview. The bizarre results are fueling interest in an almost forgotten version of quantum mechanics, one that never gave up the idea of a single, concrete reality.


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#30
Ru1138

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Year in review: Neutrinos leave tracks in ice

 

In the dark depths of an Antarctic glacier, flashes of light triggered by wispy particles called neutrinos are providing rare clues about the universe’s most extreme environments. After discovering the first high-energy neutrinos from beyond the solar system late last year, researchers with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory spent 2014 tracing the particles’ origins to the locations of the mysterious violent objects that produced them.

 

“For the first time, I can point to an area in the sky and say there’s an ultrahigh-energy object there,” says IceCube astrophysicist Nathan Whitehorn of the University of California, Berkeley. The next step, he says, is using the neutrino data to identify those objects.


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#31
Ru1138

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Strange thrust: the unproven science that could propel our children into space

 

Ever since I was old enough to read science fiction, I've wanted to visit Mars. Even the Moon would be better than nothing. Alas, rocket technology is unlikely to take me there within my lifetime.

 

The problem is that rockets are a poor tool for the job. Even if their safety record improves, they are inherently limited by the basic concept of reaction mass. Hot gases must blast out of the rear in order to move a space vehicle forward, and this entails carrying a fuel load that is hundreds of times heavier than the payload.


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#32
superexistence

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A Little Lead Can Make Graphene Magnetic

 

http://gizmodo.com/a...etic-1671641756



#33
Jakob

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It's about time this thread became hot!


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#34
joe00uk

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I wonder if scientists will ever find out the cause of the Big Bang. That would be so, so interesting but it's a shame that we can never really know how close we are to finding that out like we can (make predictions about) with other things like medicine. How are carbon nanotubes doing, by the way? I recently read somewhere (well, not that recently) that they can only be built up to a few centimetres at present.


"The Proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains." - Karl Marx
"A revolution is not a dinner party, or writing an essay, or painting a picture, or doing embroidery; it cannot be so refined, so leisurely and gentleso temperate, kind, courteous, restrained and magnanimous. A revolution is an insurrection, an act of violence by which one class overthrows another."  - Mao Zedong


#35
Ru1138

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Back into the dark

 

So much for the warmup laps.

 

Harvard physicists are looking with anticipation to the spring, when the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Switzerland, fires up after a two-year hiatus for repairs and upgrades. The last time it was running, science celebrated the discovery of the Higgs boson, a long-sought elementary particle and the last one predicted by the Standard Model.

 

There may be a lot more to come. The Higgs discovery was made before the LHC ever got to full power. It was running at just 8 teraelectron volts (TeV) — higher than any collider had ever run, but far short of its designed 14 TeV maximum.


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#36
Ru1138

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Measuring Mass May Detect Faster-than-Light Particles

 

Faster-than-light particles may be detected for the first time ever by machines designed to measure mass.

 

Tachyons are theoretical subatomic particles which always travel faster than the speed of light. Matter is forbidden, by the laws of physics, from traveling at, or above, the speed of light. As the velocity of matter increases, so does its mass, a result most famously detailed in the special theory of relativity, developed by Albert Einstein.

 

Neutrinos are tiny, uncharged particles produced during some forms of radioactive decay, and they are one of the least-understood of all subatomic particles. A new study suggests that neutrinos resemble the faster-than-light tachyons in several respects.


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#37
Jakob

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Measuring Mass May Detect Faster-than-Light Particles

 

Faster-than-light particles may be detected for the first time ever by machines designed to measure mass.

 

Tachyons are theoretical subatomic particles which always travel faster than the speed of light. Matter is forbidden, by the laws of physics, from traveling at, or above, the speed of light. As the velocity of matter increases, so does its mass, a result most famously detailed in the special theory of relativity, developed by Albert Einstein.

 

Neutrinos are tiny, uncharged particles produced during some forms of radioactive decay, and they are one of the least-understood of all subatomic particles. A new study suggests that neutrinos resemble the faster-than-light tachyons in several respects.

 

So tachyons might actually exist, huh? I wonder if you could construct a time machine (in theory) with some sort of "tachyon drive".


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#38
wjfox

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#39
Ru1138

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Dark Matter --Is It the "Operating System" of the Universe? 

 

 

Is dark matter the "operating system" of the Universe? Tom Broadhurst, an Ikerbasqueresearcher at the UPV/EHU's Department of Theoretical Physics, thinks it is. He has participated alongside scientists of the National Taiwan University in a piece of research that explores cold dark matter in depth and proposes new answers about the formation of galaxies and the structure of the Universe. These predictions, published today in the prestigious journal Nature Physics, are being contrasted with fresh data provided by the Hubble space telescope.

 

In cosmology, cold dark matter is a form of matter the particles of which move slowly in comparison with light, and interact weakly with electromagnetic radiation. It is estimated that only a minute fraction of the matter in the Universe is baryonic matter, which forms stars, planets and living organisms. The rest, comprising over 80%, is dark matter and energy.

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#40
Mike the average

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'operating system' that's the worst analogy in ages lol

then again it could be close to the original windows 8 with that ridiculous mobile user interface with no start button, like dark matter, nobody could interact with it properly...
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'Force always attracts men of low morality' - Einstein
'Great spirits always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds' - Einstein





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: physics, quantum physics, general relativity, science, cosmology, astrophysics, super collider, CERN, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics

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