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#41
Ru1138

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then again it could be close to the original windows 8 with that ridiculous mobile user interface with no start button, like dark matter, nobody could interact with it properly...


That's a burn. :p


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#42
Jakob

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All right, it's been a while since I've spewed out a long string of news articles. Let's do this.

 

Water-Resistant Takes On Whole New Meaning With This Metal

 

You probably haven’t seen something this water-resistant before. A team of scientists at the University of Rochester have created a metal so water-resistant, it bounces off of it.


Click 'show' to see quotes from great luminaries.

Spoiler

#43
Sciencerocks

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Scientists slow the speed of light

 

http://www.bbc.com/n...w-west-30944584

 

    Photons were shown to reach the "finishing line" at different times

    A team of Scottish scientists has made light travel slower than the speed of light.

    They sent photons - individual particles of light - through a special mask. It changed the photons' shape - and slowed them to less than light speed.

    The photons remained travelling at the lower speed even when they returned to free space.

    The experiment is likely to alter how science looks at light.

    The collaborators - from Glasgow and Heriot-Watt universities - are members of the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. They have published their results in the journal Science Express.

    The speed of light is regarded as an absolute. It is 186,282 miles per second in free space.

 

Doesn't time change when you get nearer to the speed of light? Being able to control this process could be quite the breakthrough.


To follow my work on tropical cyclones


#44
Yuli Ban

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^ Is this any different from this?

 

http://news.harvard....-stoplight.html

 

 

"Two years ago we slowed it down to 38 miles an hour; now we've been able to park it then bring it back up to full speed." Lene Hau isn't talking about a used motorbike, but about light – that ethereal, life-sustaining stuff that normally travels 93 million miles from the sun in about eight minutes.

 

Less than five years ago, the speed of light was considered one of the universe's great constants. Albert Einstein theorized that light cannot travel faster than 186,282 miles per second. No one has proved him wrong, but he never said that it couldn't go slower.

January 24, 2001


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Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#45
Whereas

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^ Is this any different from this?

 

Yes. I was taught that in empty space particles without mass can either sit still or travel at the speed of light, not move at sub-light speeds. The older experiment there stopped light for a short while (while passing through a cooled atom cloud), whereas the new one altered it to make it move slower than normal (even after it left the mask they used). The implication of the new experiment is that this might occur by itself under some circumstances, so it's another thing to watch out for when doing precise measurements.


If you're wrong, how would you know it?


#46
wjfox

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Stephen Hawking: 'There are no black holes'

Notion of an 'event horizon', from which nothing can escape, is incompatible with quantum theory, physicist claims.

24 January 2014

http://www.nature.co...k-holes-1.14583



#47
Ru1138

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Engineering Discovery Brings Invisibility Closer to Reality

 

Since the beginning of recorded time, humans have used materials found in nature to improve their lot. Since the turn of this century, scientists have studiedmetamaterials, artificial materials engineered to bend electromagnetic, acoustic and other types of waves in ways not possible in nature.

 

Now, Hao Xin, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Arizona, has made a discovery with these synthetic materials that may take engineers one step closer to building microscopes with superlenses that see molecular-level details, or shields that conceal military airplanes and even people.

 


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#48
Raklian

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Stephen Hawking: 'There are no black holes'

Notion of an 'event horizon', from which nothing can escape, is incompatible with quantum theory, physicist claims.

24 January 2014

http://www.nature.co...k-holes-1.14583

 

As a Physicist myself, I'm on the same bandwagon. The reason for this support is too complicated to articulate here.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#49
Craven

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So what is Cygnus X-1? ;)


"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#50
Ru1138

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So what is Cygnus X-1? ;)

 

Maybe this?


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#51
Ru1138

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Stephen Hawking: 'There are no black holes'

Notion of an 'event horizon', from which nothing can escape, is incompatible with quantum theory, physicist claims.

24 January 2014

http://www.nature.co...k-holes-1.14583

 

As a Physicist myself, I'm on the same bandwagon. The reason for this support is too complicated to articulate here.

 

 

I'd guess it has to do with spacetime on the quantum scale. On that scale spacetime is believed to be a probabalistic foam, there would be no neatly defined boundary for the black hole.

 

No Big Bang? Quantum equation predicts universe has no beginning

 

(Phys.org) —The universe may have existed forever, according to a new model that applies quantum correction terms to complement Einstein's theory of general relativity. The model may also account for dark matter and dark energy, resolving multiple problems at once.

 

The widely accepted age of the universe, as estimated by general relativity, is 13.8 billion years. In the beginning, everything in existence is thought to have occupied a single infinitely dense point, or singularity. Only after this point began to expand in a "Big Bang" did the universe officially begin.

 


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#52
Yuli Ban

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Huh. Then what are these sonic black holes doing existing? With the same Hawking radiation he predicted?


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#53
Ru1138

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Huh. Then what are these sonic black holes doing existing? With the same Hawking radiation he predicted?

 

Maybe due to the size difference between molecules and quantum foam? Speed of phonons might have to do with it as well.


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#54
Yuli Ban

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On quantum scales, there are many second laws of thermodynamics
 


New research from UCL and the Universities of Gdansk, Singapore, and Delft has uncovered additional second laws of thermodynamics which complement the ordinary second law of thermodynamics, one of the most fundamental laws of nature. These new second laws are generally not noticeable except on very small scales, at which point, they become increasingly important.

The ordinary second law states that the universe is in a growing state of disorder. It tells us that a hot cup of tea in a cold room will cool down rather than heat up; that even the most efficient machines will lose some energy as heat; and more prosaically, that a house will gradually get messier over time rather than tidying itself.
The research, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals that on very small scales there is actually a whole family of 'second laws', which can lead to unexpected and counterintuitive phenomena.


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Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#55
Jakob

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X-ray Reveals Chemical Bond Being Born

 

Scientists have used an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to get the first glimpse of the transition state where two atoms begin to form a weak bond on the way to becoming a molecule. This fundamental advance, reported in Science Express and long thought impossible, will have a profound impact on the understanding of how chemical reactions take place and on efforts to design reactions that generate energy, create new products and fertilize crops more efficiently.

 

 

And this article is from three days in the future!

 

Mon, 02/16/2015 - 7:00am


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#56
Ru1138

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How many forces?

 

If you've read many of my columns, you know quite a bit about the Standard Model. You know that there are quarks and leptons. You've heard about the gluon, the W and Z bosons, the photon and the graviton. And you know that this means that there are four fundamental forces: the strong and weak nuclear forces, electromagnetism, and gravity. Easy peasy.

 

However, the reality is actually a lot murkier: Not all forces are independent. For instance, back in the 1830s, scientists knew of two distinct forces: electricity and magnetism. But when Maxwell wrote down his equations for electric and magnetic forces in the 1860s, it became clear that the two were really one force, electromagnetism.

 


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#57
Yuli Ban

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Researchers first to observe Higgs boson analogue in superconductors


The Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the Higgs boson - the "God particle" believed responsible for all the mass in the universe - took place in 2012 at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, an underground facility where accelerated sub-atomic particles zip around the circumference of a 27-kilometer (16.9-mile) ring-shaped tunnel. But what goes around comes around: more than 50 years ago, the first hint of Higgs was inspired by the study of superconductors - a special class of metals that, when cooled to very low temperatures, allow electrons to move without resistance.

higgsboson.png


Nobody's gonna take my drone, I'm gonna fly miles far too high!
Nobody gonna beat my drone, it's gonna shoot into the sky!

#58
Ru1138

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Confirmation of ultra-high energy molecules with 500 times the bond energy of a triple carbon bond

 

Metastable Innershell Molecular State (MIMS), an innershell-bound ultra-high-energy molecule, was previously proposed to explain a ∼40% efficiency of soft-X-ray generation in ∼0.05 keV/amu nanoparticle impact on solids. Here, the MIMS model has been extended and applied to interpreting the experimental K-shell X-ray satellite spectra for more than 40 years in keV-MeV/amu heavy-ion impact on solids. The binding energies of the K-shell MIMS of elements from Al to Ti were determined to be 80–200 eV.The successful extension of the model to the K-shell MIMS confirms that all elements in the periodic table and their combinations are subjected to the MIMS formation. Uranium and gold should have MIMS with bond energies in the range of 4000 eV.

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#59
Ru1138

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Poor little physics thread is barely getting any attention...

 

Physicists offer solution to puzzle of the origin of matter in the universe

 

Most of the laws of nature treat particles and antiparticles equally, but stars and planets are made of particles, or matter, and not antiparticles, or antimatter. That asymmetry, which favors matter to a very small degree, has puzzled scientists for many years.

 

New research by Univ. of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) physicists, published in Physical Review Letters, offers a possible solution to the mystery of the origin of matter in the universe.

 

Alexander Kusenko, a professor of physics and astronomy in the UCLA College, and colleagues propose that the matter-antimatter asymmetry could be related to the Higgs boson particle, which was the subject of prominent news coverage when it was discovered at Switzerland’s Large Hadron Collider in 2012.


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#60
Ru1138

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Ancient Black Hole Is So Big It Doesn't Fit Current Theories: A Surprise From The Early Universe

 

A black hole with the mass 12 billion times that of our sun has been discovered and appears to have attained that size by the time the universe was less than a billion years old, going against current theories of black hole formation, astronomers say.

 

The black hole, 12.8 billion light years from Earth, is powering a quasar with a luminosity of 420 trillion suns, the brightest quasar in the early universe ever observed, they say.

 

Current theories hold that the black hole and its quasar could not have grown so large and so bright so soon following the birth of the universe in the Big Bang around 13.7 billion years ago, astronomers say.


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: physics, quantum physics, general relativity, science, cosmology, astrophysics, super collider, CERN, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics

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