future timeline technology singularity humanity
 
   
future timeline twitter future timeline facebook group future timeline youtube channel account videos future timeline rss feed
 
 

Resources

AI & Robotics Biology & Medicine Business & Politics Computers & the Internet
Energy & the Environment Home & Leisure Military & War Nanotechnology
Physics Society & Demographics Space Transport & Infrastructure

 

     
     
 
       
 
 
 

Society & Demographics

 

P - Population (global)

 


 

Population (global)

The graphs below are based on data from the United Nations (UN) and the US Census Bureau.**

As shown here, population growth increased significantly during the Industrial Revolution. The last 50 years have seen a yet more rapid increase, due to medical advances and substantial increases in agricultural productivity, particularly beginning in the 1960s with the Green Revolution.

The rapid increase in human population over the course of the 20th century has raised concerns about whether Earth is becoming overpopulated. The scientific consensus is that the current population growth and exponential increase in use of resources are linked to threats against the ecosystem - such as rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, global warming and pollution.

It is possible that disasters triggered by the rising demand for scarce resources will eventually lead to a sudden population crash, or even a Malthusian catastrophe.

 

future population 2000 2020 2050 global world demographics trends

 

Taking just the medium variant, the population forecast looks like this. However, it should be noted that this graph takes no account of future medical advances, or other factors (such as deaths from climate-related catastrophes). It is based purely on the current trend:

 

future population 2000 2020 2050 global world demographics trends

 

Globally, the population growth rate has been declining from its peak of 2.2% in 1963, but growth remains high in Latin America, the Middle East and Sub-Saharan Africa.

In some countries there is negative population growth (i.e. net decrease in population over time), especially in Central and Eastern Europe (mainly due to low fertility rates). Within the next decade, Japan and some countries in Western Europe are also expected to encounter negative population growth due to sub-replacement fertility rates.

 
     
   

 
     
 
 
                  Share Share
 
 
     
     
   
     
     
 

References

1 The World at Six Billion, The United Nations:
http://www0.un.org/esa/population/publications/sixbillion/sixbilpart1.pdf.
Accessed 11th May 2010.

2 Historical Estimates of World Population, U.S. Census Bureau:
http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/worldhis.html
Accessed 11th May 2010.

 

 
     
 

Resources

AI & Robotics Biology & Medicine Business & Politics Computers & the Internet
Energy & the Environment Home & Leisure Military & War Nanotechnology
Physics Society & Demographics Space Transport & Infrastructure

 

 
 
 
 

 


future timeline twitter future timeline facebook group future timeline youtube channel account videos future timeline rss feed

Privacy Policy