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The future of books

books electronic paper

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#1
stuffed_leader

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I am a huge lover of books. I've collected about a hundred books before 2008. In 2009, a huge book lover like me bought a kindle just to try it out. I have largely consumed books electronically, since 2010 and I've even stopped buying physical text books for university. Books have become like DVD's in which I buy physical copies just for the novelty.

What do you think is the future of physical books or paper use in general?
Omega point or extinction.

#2
nomad

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I think they'll still be popular among people worried about CME / EMP threats, the government, and off-grid dwellers. I think the real obsession with paper isn't in teh reading but hte freedom of writing on it. The only artist limit is your skill, can't be hacked, requires no power, and is portable.


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#3
stuffed_leader

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I think they'll still be popular among people worried about CME / EMP threats, the government, and off-grid dwellers. I think the real obsession with paper isn't in teh reading but hte freedom of writing on it. The only artist limit is your skill, can't be hacked, requires no power, and is portable.


I was thinking something along these lines for the market of paper. Militaries of the future might still use paper for important documents.
Omega point or extinction.

#4
kjaggard

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I've likely got a couple thousand books myself. I have an e reader that I pretty much never use. The thing is the books never need to be charged. Their screens don't crack, and I don't lose 100s of bucks (reader and individual books in it) if I set it down in a public place and use the bathroom and somebody swipes what I'm reading.

 

I can give a book away to a friend or loved one when I am done with it. I can trace the diagrams in an instructional book, or enlarge a part of it with a projector and make wall art of scaled blueprints of plans or clothing patterns.

 

They aren't hurt if a guest sits on one that slipped between the cushions of the couch. and they don't have touch screens or buttons that don't always work.

 

Besides which many of my books are so unusual and cover such esoteric things that you won't find a digital example of them anywhere.

 

Aside from that there is a reliability and value in having a substancial tactile format.

 

E readers may be good for shallow readers, people who read like others flip through channels on tv for something to watch. I don't read that way. If I'm reading something it's because I sought it out specifically. It is not a casual thing forgotten after being read and never looked at again. It's not some digital whisp that fades with the memory of what I had for lunch yesterday and what I was wearing at the time. They are storehouses of thoughts and experiences and references and knowledge, things to be explored and rehandled and shared with others. digital files are just too imperminant.


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#5
jamesgera

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I believe paper will go extinct except for toilet paper.
I can't see us inventing technology that would make wiping easier.
Look at a book in reading at the moment called Mr Mercedes by Stephen king.

In the book the villain talks about how the local electrical store he works in is dying out.

With netflix Hulu Amazon shipping people don't need to buy DVDs or CDs or anything really just order it online.

The same goes with books why spend so much on a book when Amazon is cheaper easier to store and easier to carry around.

Books online on kindle take out the cost of shipping and all the other Middle men which is why it is only 4€.
So only king Amazon and the publisher make money.

So I believe books will die out in the paper back sense.

#6
stuffed_leader

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I've likely got a couple thousand books myself. I have an e reader that I pretty much never use. The thing is the books never need to be charged. Their screens don't crack, and I don't lose 100s of bucks (reader and individual books in it) if I set it down in a public place and use the bathroom and somebody swipes what I'm reading.
 
I can give a book away to a friend or loved one when I am done with it. I can trace the diagrams in an instructional book, or enlarge a part of it with a projector and make wall art of scaled blueprints of plans or clothing patterns.
 
They aren't hurt if a guest sits on one that slipped between the cushions of the couch. and they don't have touch screens or buttons that don't always work.
 
Besides which many of my books are so unusual and cover such esoteric things that you won't find a digital example of them anywhere.
 
Aside from that there is a reliability and value in having a substancial tactile format.
 
E readers may be good for shallow readers, people who read like others flip through channels on tv for something to watch. I don't read that way. If I'm reading something it's because I sought it out specifically. It is not a casual thing forgotten after being read and never looked at again. It's not some digital whisp that fades with the memory of what I had for lunch yesterday and what I was wearing at the time. They are storehouses of thoughts and experiences and references and knowledge, things to be explored and rehandled and shared with others. digital files are just too imperminant.


I'm not the tv reader you describe. I genuinely love the books I read. When I travel a lot during the year I tend to have multiple things to read and not enough room really for 7 books. I do get your points though, but have never experienced them (yet). E-books stay in the cloud (forever), so I'm not getting the feeling of non permanent whips you describe.
Omega point or extinction.

#7
TheComrade

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I am a huge lover of books. I've collected about a hundred books before 2008. In 2009, a huge book lover like me bought a kindle just to try it out. I have largely consumed books electronically, since 2010 and I've even stopped buying physical text books for university.

 

The same... All the physical books i've bought are older than 2008-2010... As for the book future, still i'd not expect physical books disappearing anytime soon. there will always be some "gift items" or something like that.



#8
jamesgera

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I am a huge lover of books. I've collected about a hundred books before 2008. In 2009, a huge book lover like me bought a kindle just to try it out. I have largely consumed books electronically, since 2010 and I've even stopped buying physical text books for university.

 
The same... All the physical books i've bought are older than 2008-2010... As for the book future, still i'd not expect physical books disappearing anytime soon. there will always be some "gift items" or something like that.

I say give it another generation till the books are dead.





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