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History of Humans & Primates

humans primates cro magnon neanderthals proto-human evolution hunter-gatherer human evolution australopithecus primate evolution

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#61
Lily

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well, there are some moral implications of cloning a neanderthal since these creatures are sentient like us. ive read somewhere that it may be possible that neanderthals are even smarter than us, though they do not have complex ability on art or the like. anyway, the neanderthal looks like ron weasley when hes gonna be 40.


This. I don't see cloning happening anytime soon, as not many people would agree to having a sentient and human being (they're unarguably human after all) cloned for study reasons. Imagine what it would look like - kind of like having someone in a zoo to see and study his/her daily behaviour and things we have in common and things we don't. Seeing the whole uproar and heaty discussions about embryonic stem cells - cells! - which have arisen in the past few decades, cloning and studying a human being, looking very similar to ourselves, being actually kind of related to us, seems very far off, imo. There's a huge ethical question in there, altough it would be pretty much mindblowing and interesting, admittedly, to have some Neanderthals alive right now.

Edited by Lily, 24 October 2012 - 01:27 PM.

"All scientific advancement due to intellegence overcoming, compensating, for limitations. Can't carry a load, so invent wheel. Can't catch food, so invent spear. Limitations. No limitations, no advancement. No advancement, culture stagnates. Works other way too. Advancement before culture is ready. Disastrous."

There's definitely truth in that...


#62
Raklian

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Must've been awkward or shocking for some of the people talking to each other while the neanderthal penis is dangling right there. Cool! Nonetheless, great work!
What are you without the sum of your parts?

#63
Lux

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http://news.national...rbred-dna-gene/

#64
King of Ace

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why must they do that? they might as well create private slut for each an everyone for us.

I am not a fan of S.T show "just don't like it" ,Its boring like hell but I love to see cool technology in coming years.

i don't live in really great english countries like some you guys, im alittle indian,chinese,enbgrish ,mexican, leaf village and soul society .


#65
Raklian

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why must they do that? they might as well create private slut for each an everyone for us.


I'd like that very much - but with one condition, the slut must have the self-sustenance to be locked up in a closet for long periods. Matter of days, even months, in case I have an occasional girlfriend who isn't too shy about shagging.
What are you without the sum of your parts?

#66
wjfox

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New brain gene gives us edge over apes, study suggests

Scientists have taken a step forward in helping to solve one of life's greatest mysteries -- what makes us human? An international team of researchers have discovered a new gene that helps explain how humans evolved from chimpanzees.

Scientists say the gene -- called miR-941 -- appears to have played a crucial role in human brain development and may shed light on how we learned to use tools and language.

http://www.scienceda...21114113458.htm

#67
Kombaticus

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We didn't evolve from Chimpanzees. Good article though.

Edited by Kombaticus, 15 November 2012 - 12:33 AM.

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"Let teachers and priests and philosophers brood over questions of reality and illusion. I know this: if life is an illusion, then I am no less an illusion, and being thus, the illusion is real to me. I live, I burn with life, I love, I slay, and I am content." -Conan the Cimmerian


#68
Time_Traveller

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Researchers have been able to trace a line between some of the earliest modern humans to settle in China and people living in the region today.

The evidence comes from DNA extracted from a 40,000-year-old leg bone found in a cave near Beijing.

Results show that the person it belonged to was related to the ancestors of present-day Asians and Native Americans.

The results are published in the journal PNAS.

Humans who looked broadly like present-day people started to appear in the fossil record of Eurasia between 40,000 and 50,000 years ago.

But many questions remain about the genetic relationships between these early modern humans and present-day Homo sapiens populations.

For example, some evidence hints at extensive migration into Europe after the last Ice Age.

And fossil finds from Red Deer Cave, also in China, and Iwo Eleru in Nigeria point to a hitherto unappreciated diversity among Late Pleistocene humans.

 

From http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-21123717


Edited by Time_Traveller, 23 January 2013 - 03:45 PM.

“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#69
Time_Traveller

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We may need to look again at the idea that a late Neanderthal population existed in southern Spain as recently as 35,000 years ago, a study suggests.

Scientists using a "more reliable" form of radiocarbon dating have re-assessed fossils from the region and found them to be far older than anyone thought.

The work appears in the journal PNAS.

Its results have implications for when and where we - modern humans - might have co-existed with our evolutionary "cousins", the Neanderthals.

 

From http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-21330194

 

Well time to change our history books again due to this study.


“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#70
Time_Traveller

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13 March 2013

 

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A study of Neanderthal skulls suggests that they became extinct because they had larger eyes than our species.

 

As a result, more of their brain was devoted to seeing in the long, dark nights in Europe, at the expense of high-level processing.

 

This ability enabled our species, Homo Sapiens, to fashion warmer clothes and develop larger social networks, helping us to survive the ice age in Europe.

 

The study is published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B Journal.

 

Neanderthals are a closely related species of human that lived in Europe from around 250,000 years ago. They coexisted and interacted briefly with our species until they went extinct about 28,000 years ago, in part due to an ice age.

 

The research team explored the idea that the ancestor of Neanderthals left Africa and had to adapt to the longer, darker nights and murkier days of Europe. The result was that Neanderthals evolved larger eyes and a much larger visual processing area at the back of their brains.

 

The humans that stayed in Africa, on the other hand, continued to enjoy bright and beautiful days and so had no need for such an adaption.

 

Instead, these people, our ancestors, evolved their frontal lobes, associated with higher level thinking, before they spread across the globe.

 

Eiluned Pearce of Oxford University decided to check this theory. She compared the skulls of 32 Homo sapiens and 13 Neanderthal skulls.

 

From http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-21759233

 

Wow, thats how Neanderthals got wiped out there eyes.


Edited by Time_Traveller, 13 March 2013 - 09:09 AM.

“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#71
kjaggard

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what? This is such a bad bit of science. 1) the house cats eyes are smaller than human eyes but are much better dark adapted, and better suited to night hunting life styles. - cats neither died out, nor had 'bigger eyes than us'. 2) Even if we accept that neanderthals had larger eyes it doe not point to decreased intellect. 3) even if we pretend that decreased intellect was the result, I'm pretty sure a squirrel is dumber than a neanderthal, and one of those f-ers is still stealing all the birdseed from the bird feeders and thus they didn't die out. 4) neanderthal had larger brains in total with a body size at about the same, so having larger visual cortex does not equal less space to use for thinking. 5) and finally even if any of these quack ideas turn out to be what really happened... there is no way to prove it. How the hell do you prove that big eyeballs caused a die out of a species through anything other than eyeball parasites or something like that. To say that big eyes spells the end of a species, just because they are gone and had big eyes. That's bordering on some of the creationist arguments for a 6000 year old earth.

 

there are other better ideas as to die out causes, but right now I need to go to bed. I've gotta be up in the morning to go to work, and my tiny little eyes need to rest or I might go extinct. :p


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#72
Raklian

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"We infer that Neanderthals had a smaller cognitive part of the brain and this would have limited them, including their ability to form larger groups. If you live in a larger group, you need a larger brain in order to process all those extra relationships," he explained.

 

Sounds like a plausible factor in the demise of Neanderthals. Of course, like kjaggard said, there is more to it than meets the eye. Pun intended! :)


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#73
wjfox

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Neanderthal genome sequenced



#74
Raklian

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Wow, that's pretty amazing. We only had pieces of worn-out remnants of their legacy to figure out their entire genome.

 

I challenge our extremely advanced descendants to do the same for re-creating consciousnesses of people who died and decomposed completely long ago. :)


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What are you without the sum of your parts?

#75
CamGoldenGun

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*mostly* sequenced or as good as we're going to get. We won't be able to re-create them like we would passenger pigeon or woolly mammoth.



#76
wjfox

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#77
Colonel O'Neil

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we are beast.


The art of forgetting is inherent in human minds; the art of being forgotten  is the normal fate of knowing. We as futurists don't accept that. In the panels of the Universe, we alone will remain standing; remain unforgotten.


#78
SG-1

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It's almost spooky to see exponential progression occur in so many places.  Going back to the beginning of time.  Exponential progression is there


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Hey.  Stop reading.  The post is over.


#79
Craven

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I wouldn't look at size, volume or mass. Sperm whales have 5 times larger brains than humans. Brain to body mass ratio is also misleading - it's largest for birds and insects, very small for elephants.


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"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#80
FutureOfToday

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Strange how it gradually creeped up for millions of years then suddenly shot up, the same way the population shot up in the 20th century - we really are living in times of massive change.
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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: humans, primates, cro magnon, neanderthals, proto-human, evolution, hunter-gatherer, human evolution, australopithecus, primate evolution

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