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History of Humans & Primates

humans primates cro magnon neanderthals proto-human evolution hunter-gatherer human evolution australopithecus primate evolution

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#121
Italian Ufo

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I hope they will recreate it one day.



#122
FutureOfToday

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Wait... wasn't there recently that prediction that thousands of years into the future, humans will evolve to have huge anime-like eyes?

#123
Raklian

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Wait... wasn't there recently that prediction that thousands of years into the future, humans will evolve to have huge anime-like eyes?

 

More like instead of the familar configuration of the biological eye, we will probably end up with a complex integrated sensor that will be capable of capturing a vastly wider swath of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum.


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#124
wjfox

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Genetic study pushes back timeline for first significant human population expansion

 

This week in the advance access edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution

 

About 10,000 years ago, the Neolithic age ushered in one of the most dramatic periods of human cultural and technological transition, where independently, different world populations developed the domestication of plants and animals. The hunter-gatherers gave rise to herders and farmers. Changes to a more sedentary lifestyle and larger settlements are widely thought to have contributed to a worldwide human population explosion, from an estimated 4-6 million people to 60-70 million by 4,000 B.C.

 

Now, researchers Aimé, et al., have challenged this assumption using a large set of populations from diverse geographical regions (20 different genomic regions and mitochondrial DNA of individuals from 66 African and Eurasian populations), and compared their genetic results with archaeological findings. The dispersal and expansion of Neolithic culture from the Middle East has recently been associated with the distribution of human genetic markers.

 

They conclude that the first significant expansion of human populations appears to be much older than the emergence of farming and herding, dating back to the Paleolithic (60,000-80,000 years ago) rather than Neolithic age. Therefore, hunter-gatherer populations were able to thrive with cultural and social advances that allowed for the expansion. The authors also speculate that this Paleolithic human population expansion may be linked to the emergence of newer, more advanced hunting technologies or a rapid environmental change to dryer climates.

 

Finally, they also suggest that strong Paleolithic expansions may have favored the emergence of sedentary farming in some populations during the Neolithic. Indeed, the authors also demonstrate that the populations who adopted a sedentary farming lifestyle during the Neolithic had previously experienced the strongest Paleolithic expansions. Conversely, contemporary nomadic herder populations in Eurasia experienced moderate Paleolithic expansions, and no expansions were detected for nomadic hunter-gatherers in Africa. "Human populations could have started to increase in Paleolithic times, and strong Paleolithic expansions in some populations may have ultimately favored their shift toward agriculture during the Neolithic," said Aimé.

 

http://www.eurekaler...e-gsp092313.php



#125
kjaggard

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this is still bad science. they surmise that social regions of the brain were compromised by the over sized eyes. Based on what evidence? None, it's conjecture.

 

On top of that Corvids have a social structure and teach each other societal rules and patterns and they teach each other how to make and use tools as well as innovate new solutions themselves. Their whole brain could fit in a human eye socket. The neaderthal brain size is more than sufficient to accomodate high intellect, social interactions and vision the same or better than humans of today.

 

Some fools in a lab said: "Hummm, neandertals have bigger eyes, and they are dead. I know their eyes caused them to die out, now I just have to prove it."

 

Notice the flipping of the scientific method... now we have to try and disprove it.


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
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Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#126
kjaggard

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1) being black does nt mean you don't have neanderthal DNA. Nor does being from africa within the last four hundred years. The neanderthal DNA was introduced into human blood lines in the area around the middle east... literally the first place humans went when they left africa. and since then travel has been going in and out of africa for centuries.

 

The Africans without the neanderthal traces are isolated tribes, usually sub saharran. with strict intermarrying traditions.

 

2) there is no evidence for neaderthals being more agressive. they were more muscular, eat more meat. But the muscularity in part can be explained by clues found in there chosen tools and skin processing techniques as well as the hunting, butchering and carrying of large amounts of meat from mega fauna rather than antelope and rabbits or a veg diet.

 

3) All white folk have some neanderthal genes, so do all asians, and aboriginies and native americans, middle easterners, much of northern africa, even the polynesians and maori and hawaiians. Denosivans only appear in a small subset of asians. Usually in groups that have dark skin and curly hair but not always.

 

4) There has been implication that even the ones who remained in africa and didn't intermix with neanderthal DNA may have interbred with another still unnamed hommonid anscestor. Like the case of a man whose hapapolo group can be traced back to before the common line of all modern homosapien lines, one explanation for this is that is the possibility that he represents either a line of human anscestors who bread with an african humanoid cousin, or also possible is that african people as a whole bread with them and his line is the line that didn't.

 

5) it makes nobody better or inferior to have any of those things. anymore than a poodle is better than a labrador retriever.


Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#127
Time_Traveller

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18 October 2013

 

Posted Image

 

The idea that there were several different human species walking the Earth two million years ago has been dealt a blow.

Instead, scientists say early human fossils found in Africa and Eurasia may have been part of the same species.

Writing in Science, the team says that Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis and Homo erectus are all part of a single evolving lineage that led to modern humans.

But others in the field reject this.

A team looked at the most complete hominid skull ever found which was uncovered in Dmanisi, Georgia.

It had a small braincase, large teeth and a long face, characteristics it shares with H.habilis. But many features from the braincase were also unique to H.erectus.

The 1.8-million-year old skull comes from a site that has unveiled the biggest collections of well-preserved early human remains known anywhere in the world.

 

 

 http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-24564375

 

It's really good to see the new outcome of evolutionary of the human species 2 million years ago.


“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#128
WithoutCoincidence

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Wow, that's a big surprise, though it shouldn't in hindsight. In retrospect, the beginning of our genus probably meant there wasn't time yet for much diversification.


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The universe has gone from unimaginable, featureless heat to complexity and it will return in time to unimaginable, featureless cold.

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#129
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That's a pretty major discovery if true.



#130
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I do not think this is as significant as it might seem. It is more like the change in the designation of Pluto. We already knew Cro-Magnon and Neanderthal interbred from genetic testing. The term species is somewhat arbitrary not based on any absolute criteria. Also there is often a great deal of diversity within a single species; every breed of domestic dog in the world is technically the same species for example.


Confirmed Agnostic - I know that I don't know for sure and I am almost certain no one else does either.


#131
FutureOfToday

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^I completely agree. It's not like we've discovered that things were dramatically different in the past, we're just redefining how we categorise certain species and subspecies. Saying a homo australopithecus is the same species as homo sapiens is the same as grouping chihuahuas and greyhounds into the same species.

#132
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9 December 2013

 

Scientists have found that Neanderthals organized their living spaces in ways that would be familiar to modern humans, a discovery that once again shows similarities between these two close cousins.
The findings, published in the latest edition of the Canadian Journal of Archaeology, indicate that Neanderthals butchered animals, made tools and gathered round the fire in different parts of their shelters.
"There has been this idea that Neanderthals did not have an organized use of space, something that has always been attributed to humans," said Julien Riel-Salvatore, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Colorado Denver and lead author of the study.

 

 
 
 
Another stage in how we became Modern Humans.

“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#133
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21 December 2013
 
Posted Image
 
An analysis of a Neanderthal's fossilised hyoid bone - a horseshoe-shaped structure in the neck - suggests the species had the ability to speak.
This has been suspected since the 1989 discovery of a Neanderthal hyoid that looks just like a modern human's.
But now computer modelling of how it works has shown this bone was also used in a very similar way.
Writing in journal Plos One, scientists say its study is "highly suggestive" of complex speech in Neanderthals.
The hyoid bone is crucial for speaking as it supports the root of the tongue. In non-human primates, it is not placed in the right position to vocalise like humans.
An international team of researchers analysed a fossil Neanderthal throat bone using 3D x-ray imaging and mechanical modelling.
This model allowed the group to see how the hyoid behaved in relation to the other surrounding bones.

 

 
 
I would think that Neanderthals would speak like any other human if the hyoid bone was in the correct place like humans.

“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#134
diego2001578

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Someone knows what happened with this?  

 

Help wanted: 'Adventurous' woman to give birth to ... a Neanderthal baby?

Pioneering Harvard geneticist George Church suggests that the day is coming when we'll want to reverse-engineer the....

 

http://www.nbcnews.c...-baby-1B8061807



#135
Italian Ufo

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I hope they will re-create the Neanderthal before 2030.



#136
Zeitgeist123

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21 December 2013
 
Posted Image
 
An analysis of a Neanderthal's fossilised hyoid bone - a horseshoe-shaped structure in the neck - suggests the species had the ability to speak.
This has been suspected since the 1989 discovery of a Neanderthal hyoid that looks just like a modern human's.
But now computer modelling of how it works has shown this bone was also used in a very similar way.
Writing in journal Plos One, scientists say its study is "highly suggestive" of complex speech in Neanderthals.
The hyoid bone is crucial for speaking as it supports the root of the tongue. In non-human primates, it is not placed in the right position to vocalise like humans.
An international team of researchers analysed a fossil Neanderthal throat bone using 3D x-ray imaging and mechanical modelling.
This model allowed the group to see how the hyoid behaved in relation to the other surrounding bones.

 

 
 
I would think that Neanderthals would speak like any other human if the hyoid bone was in the correct place like humans.

 

chuck norris


“Philosophy is a pretty toy if one indulges in it with moderation at the right time of life. But if one pursues it further than one should, it is absolute ruin." - Callicles to Socrates


#137
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29 January 2014

 

Posted Image
 
Genes that cause disease in people today were picked up through interbreeding with Neanderthals, a major study in Nature journal suggests.
They passed on genes involved in type 2 diabetes, Crohn's disease and - curiously - smoking addiction.
Genome studies reveal that our species (Homo sapiens) mated with Neanderthals shortly after leaving Africa.
But it was previously unclear what this Neanderthal DNA did and whether there were any implications for human health.
Between 2% and 4% of the genetic blueprint of present-day non-Africans came from Neanderthals.
By screening the genomes of 1,004 modern humans, Sriram Sankararaman and his colleagues identified regions bearing the Neanderthal versions of different genes.
That a gene variant associated with the inability to stop smoking should be found to be of Neanderthal origin is a surprise.
The researchers are, of course, not suggesting that our evolutionary cousins were puffing away in their caves.
Instead, they argue, this gene may have more than one function; the modern effect of this genetic marker on smoking behaviour may be one impact among several.
 
 
So thats where we get diseases from our ancestors the Neanderthals.

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“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#138
Raklian

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Damn them!

 

If I happen to die because of some disease, I shall not go quietly into the night because as I fall into the abyss, I'll be thinking along these lines "damn whoever thought mating with a Neanderthal was a good idea!"


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#139
wjfox

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New dates rewrite Neanderthal story

Modern humans and Neanderthals co-existed in Europe 10 times longer than previously thought, a study suggests.

The most comprehensive dating of Neanderthal bones and tools ever carried out suggests that the two species lived side-by-side for up to 5,000 years.

The new evidence suggests that the two groups may even have exchanged ideas and culture, say the researchers.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-28693371


_76801252_excavationofcuevamorinspainrem



#140
Yuli Ban

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If only they didn't go extinct. Really could use multiple human species right about now.

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: humans, primates, cro magnon, neanderthals, proto-human, evolution, hunter-gatherer, human evolution, australopithecus, primate evolution

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