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History of Humans & Primates

humans primates cro magnon neanderthals proto-human evolution hunter-gatherer human evolution australopithecus primate evolution

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#161
Jakob

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Indonesian shell has 'earliest human engraving'

 

Zig-zag patterns found on a fossilised shell in Indonesia may be the earliest engraving by a human ancestor, a study has claimed.

The engraving is at least 430,000 years old, meaning it was done by the long-extinct Homo erectus, said the study.

The oldest man-made markings previously found were about 130,000 years old.

If confirmed, experts say the findings published in the journal Nature may force a rethink of how human culture developed.

 



#162
Yuli Ban

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Picture for the yet unastounded.

 

_79500963_shellfotage.jpg

_79505687_shellfotage.jpg


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#163
Cosmic Cat

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The dude was probably bored and grabbed a rock to doodle. I would've done that too.



#164
Yuli Ban

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That's art in a nutshell. No pun intended.

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#165
Jakob

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I'm guessing it's abstract art.



#166
Yuli Ban

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As abstract as Homo erectus could get, at least.

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#167
Jakob

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(Reuters) - Human ancestors may have been capable of using tools much earlier than previously thought.

Scientists said on Thursday an analysis of fossil hand bones of the species Australopithecus africanus that lived in southern Africa about 3 million to 2 million years ago indicated this human forerunner could use its hands in ways very much like modern people.

This species, known for its mix of ape-like and human-like characteristics, possessed the uniquely human ability to have a power-squeeze grip as needed to wield a hammer and a forceful precision grip as used to turn a key, the study showed.

http://www.reuters.c...N0KV2K120150123



#168
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Humans have taken millions of years to evolve in the right direction.

 

Humans are the gods of the earth.

 

human_supremacy_by_alexer-d84wqio.jpg



#169
Yuli Ban

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The Primates That Excelled— Humans Change The World


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#170
Yuli Ban

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Why stop there!

There's a whole interactive timeline. Perhaps we should use it for references in regards to the Past Timeline.

 

http://humanorigins....ine-interactive

 

Sarcastic-Facebook-Status-26703-statusmi

No anti-evolution trolling, this is a thread dedicated to our evolution.

And besides

tcyXCOP.jpg


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#171
Yuli Ban

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From

Ape-man-with-bone-from-Stanley-Kubricks-

To

flat,550x550,075,f.jpg


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#172
Raklian

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Damn...

 

843e4043-caf1-4c2d-88cd-d8534f639024.jpg


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#173
Raklian

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It's what we do.... the very reason we have yet to reach Type I status.

 

Monkey-460.jpg

 

 

Monkey_Poo_for_you_pt6_by_Jays_Doodles.j


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What are you without the sum of your parts?

#174
Time_Traveller

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4 March 2015

 

_81406168_81405983.jpg
 
Scientists have unearthed the jawbone of what they claim is one of the very first humans.
The 2.8 million-year-old specimen is 400,000 years older than researchers thought that our kind first emerged.
The discovery in Ethiopia suggests climate change spurred the transition from tree dweller to upright walker.
The head of the research team told BBC News that the find gives the first insight into "the most important transitions in human evolution".
This is the most important transition in human evolution
Prof Brian Villmoare, University of Nevada
Prof Brian Villmoare of the University of Nevada in Las Vegas said the discovery makes a clear link between an iconic 3.2 million-year-old hominin (human-like primate) discovered in the same area in 1974, called "Lucy".
Could Lucy's kind - which belonged to the species Australopithecus afarensis - have evolved into the very first primitive humans?

 

 
 

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“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#175
Yuli Ban

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Now that's an amazing find. The first Homo or a very, very late Pithecus, I'm sure.


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#176
wjfox

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This is big news. What a shame I don't have Past Timeline up and running. :( This would have made an excellent blog.


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#177
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This is big news. What a shame I don't have Past Timeline up and running. :( This would have made an excellent blog.

 

Definitely.


“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#178
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20 May 2015

 

_83115944_untitledcutattempt.jpg

 

The world's oldest stone tools have been discovered, scientists report.
They were unearthed from the shores of Lake Turkana in Kenya, and date to 3.3 million years ago.
They are 700,000 years older than any tools found before, even pre-dating the earliest humans in the Homo genus.
The find, reported in Nature, suggests that more ancient species, such as Australopithecus afarensis or Kenyanthropus platyops, may have been more sophisticated than was thought.
"They are significantly earlier than anything that has been found previously," said Dr Nick Taylor, from the National Centre of Scientific Research (CNRS) in France and the University of Leiden in the Netherlands.
"It's really quite astonishing to think what separates the previous oldest site and this site is 700,000 years of time. It's monumental."

 

 
 
 
Another update in the history books.

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“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking


#179
sorcerer

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Thanks for the link.



#180
caltrek

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Shoot, there are places in California where all I have to do is walk to the beach to find non-human mammals using stones as tools.  They are called sea otters and use the stones to break open abalone shells. 

 

Still, it is interesting to find that ancestors to humans and not just humans were using stone tolls. As sorcerer indicated, thanks for the link.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: humans, primates, cro magnon, neanderthals, proto-human, evolution, hunter-gatherer, human evolution, australopithecus, primate evolution

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