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#5101
Sciencerocks

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SpaceX launches unpiloted Dragon cargo ship to space station

https://www.cbsnews....-space-station/

SpaceX launches unpiloted Dragon cargo ship to space station

By William Harwood
 


Pressing ahead after an April 20 test mishap that destroyed a Crew Dragon astronaut ferry ship, SpaceX launched a Falcon 9 rocket early Saturday that successfully boosted an unpiloted Dragon cargo capsule into orbit with nearly 5,500 pounds of equipment and supplies for the International Space Station's crew.

In a now-familiar spectacle, the rocket's first stage, making its first flight, flew itself back to Earth after propelling the Dragon out of the thick lower atmosphere, putting on a fiery nighttime show as it executed a picture-perfect descent to a SpaceX droneship stationed in the Atlantic Ocean about 17 miles from the launch pad. It was SpaceX's 39th successful booster landing and its 25th at sea.

SpaceX originally intended to bring the stage back to a landing at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, but the destruction of the Crew Dragon spacecraft two weeks ago left hazardous debris and other wreckage strewn across the company's landing site, prompting mission managers to target the droneship instead.

Launch was delayed 24 hours because of an electrical problem aboard the droneship Friday, but the system was repaired and the floating landing pad was returned to service in time for Saturday's 2:48 a.m. EDT launch.

In any case, a little more than a minute after the first stage settled to the deck of the "Of Course I Still Love You" droneship, the cargo Dragon was released from the Falcon 9's second stage, kicking off a two-day rendezvous with the space station.
(snip)

 



#5102
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The moon is quaking as it shrinks

by University of Maryland

A 2010 analysis of imagery from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) found that the moon shriveled like a raisin as its interior cooled, leaving behind thousands of cliffs called thrust faults on the moon's surface.

 

A new analysis suggests that the moon may still be shrinking today and actively producing moonquakes along these thrust faults. A team of researchers including Nicholas Schmerr, an assistant professor of geology at the University of Maryland, designed a new algorithm to re-analyze seismic data from instruments placed by NASA's Apollo missions in the 1960s and '70s. Their analysis provided more accurate epicenter location data for 28 moonquakes recorded from 1969 to 1977.

The team then superimposed this location data onto the LRO imagery of the thrust faults. Based on the quakes' proximity to the thrust faults, the researchers found that at least eight of the quakes likely resulted from true tectonic activity—the movement of crustal plates—along the thrust faults, rather than from asteroid impacts or rumblings deep within the moon's interior.

Although the Apollo instruments recorded their last quake shortly before the instruments were retired in 1977, the researchers suggest that the moon is likely still experiencing quakes to this day. A paper describing the work, co-authored by Schmerr, was published in the journal Nature Geoscience on May 13, 2019.

 

https://phys.org/new...on-quaking.html



#5103
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SpaceX is building another Starship in Florida
The competition is on.

 
 

After a poster on NASASpaceflight.com uploaded pictures of another Starship vehicle (f.k.a. BFR) under construction in Florida -- to go along with prototypes being built in Texas -- Elon Musk explained what's going on. The CEO tweeted that "SpaceX is doing simultaneous competing builds of Starship in Boca Chica Texas & Cape Canaveral Florida." He said the plan is to find out which location is the most effective even if the answer "might be both."

Still, if the plan is to get these on the moon ASAP -- with other billionaires making plans for lunar travel as we speak -- doubling up on production seems like a good idea. For now, SpaceX's next launch is scheduled for tomorrow to launch 60 of its Starlink internet satellites on a Falcon 9 rocket.

 


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#5104
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Arch Mission Foundation
@archmission
 
Beresheet impact site found by NASA. Debris would be too small to appear in images. Lunar Library is 120mm - smaller than a pixel. Impact energy would not have destroyed it as it is solid metal+epoxy and it is likely intact somewhere far from the crater. (link: http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/1101) lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/1101
 
4:00 PM · May 15, 2019 · TweetDeck
 
 
content_BeresheetImpact_1100px.gif

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#5105
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Chang'e-4: Chinese rover 'confirms' Moon crater theory

By Paul Rincon
Science editor, BBC News website

15 May 2019


The Chinese Chang'e-4 rover may have confirmed a longstanding idea about the origin of a vast crater on the Moon's far side.

The rover's landing site lies within a vast impact depression created by an asteroid strike billions of years ago.

Now, mission scientists have found evidence that impact was so powerful it punched through the Moon's crust and into the layer below called the mantle.

Chang'e-4 has identified what appear to be mantle rocks on the surface.

It's something the rover was sent to the far side to find out.

 


-snip-

Read more: https://www.bbc.com/...onment-48285503


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#5106
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SpaceX Single Stage to Orbit Starship
Brian Wang | May 18, 2019
 

28

The new upper stage of the SpaceX Super Heavy Starship is called the Starship. Elon Musk has described that the Starship can make it to orbit in a single stage but it would not be able to have a heat shield, landing propellant or landing legs. It is single stage to orbit with virtually no payload or it is reusable.

It technically could, but wouldn’t have enough mass margin for a heat shield, landing propellant or legs, so not reusable

https://www.nextbigf...t-starship.html



#5107
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SpaceX Starhopper Tests Resume May 28
Brian Wang | May 17, 2019
Screen-Shot-2019-04-18-at-11.08.19-PM-73

8

Spadre reports that SpaceX will restart Starhopper testing May 28.

SpaceX also has two orbital versions of the Starship under construction.

These fully reusable rocket will make rocket launching costs far more like airplanes.

 

https://www.nextbigf...ume-may-28.html







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: space exploration, aerospace engineering, astronomy, NASA, SpaceX, interstellar, telescopes, satellites, Mars, space

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