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#5161
Jessica

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SpaceX Orbital Starship Structure Nearing Completion
Brian Wang | July 12, 2019
Screen-Shot-2019-07-12-at-11.20.00-PM-73

14

The structure of the SpaceX orbital starship appears to be nearing completion. SpaceX will then need to add in about seven Raptor engines.

Best pictures I’ve gotten to date of #starhopper in Cocoa pic.twitter.com/qqofdpB5Lt

— Brian  (@flying_briann) July 12, 2019

 

https://www.nextbigf...completion.html


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#5162
Jessica

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New Hubble constant measurement adds to mystery of universe's expansion rate

by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Astronomers have made a new measurement of how fast the universe is expanding, using an entirely different kind of star than previous endeavors. The revised measurement, which comes from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, falls in the center of a hotly debated question in astrophysics that may lead to a new interpretation of the universe's fundamental properties.

 

Scientists have known for almost a century that the universe is expanding, meaning the distance between galaxies across the universe is becoming ever more vast every second. But exactly how fast space is stretching, a value known as the Hubble constant, has remained stubbornly elusive.

 

https://phys.org/new...-expansion.html



#5163
Yuli Ban

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American kids would much rather be YouTubers than astronauts

Exactly 50 years ago today, a Saturn V rocket launched from Kennedy Space Center carrying Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins to the Moon. Four days later, Armstrong and Aldrin would land on the Moon and inspire a generation of young people to become scientists, engineers, and mathematicians.
The Apollo program's effect of inspiring America's children to pursue careers in STEM fields is one of the most powerful lasting legacies of the Moon race. Unfortunately, this effect seems to be coming to an end.
On the eve of the Apollo 11 anniversary, LEGO asked The Harris Poll to survey a total of 3,000 children in the United States, China, and the United Kingdom about their attitudes toward and knowledge of space. The results reveal that, at least for Western countries, kids today are more interested in YouTube than spaceflight.

nkaUB7r.jpg


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#5164
Jakob

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I'm just offended that "machine learner" isn't even on the list.


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#5165
Jessica

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I'm just offended that "machine learner" isn't even on the list.

 

 

This generation is too lazy to want to be explorers as that is hard work as it is much easier to sit at the computer and tweet.



#5166
eacao

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I'm just offended that "machine learner" isn't even on the list.

 
 
This generation is too lazy to want to be explorers as that is hard work as it is much easier to sit at the computer and tweet.

Very pessimistic view of the world! I’ll have you know—

I was going to rebut you but then I looked at the U.S. participation rate and it’s the lowest it’s been since 1978 and quite a bit lower than China’s today. Hmm..
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Only take advice from people who have what you want.
You don't decide your future. You decide your habits, and your habits decide your future.
Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. - Abraham Lincoln.

#5167
eacao

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I'm just offended that "machine learner" isn't even on the list.


[My understanding is] humans have to train these neural nets by annotating objects and defining parameters. Thus, shouldn’t “machine teacher”, “machine mentor”, or “machine sensei” be more apt?




Hmmm?
Only take advice from people who have what you want.
You don't decide your future. You decide your habits, and your habits decide your future.
Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. - Abraham Lincoln.

#5168
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SpaceX Test-Fires 'Starhopper' Starship Prototype, Creates Big Fireball

By Amy Thompson 7 hours ago Spaceflight

But Starhopper apparently emerged relatively unscathed.


As the world celebrates the 50th anniversary of one of humanity’s greatest achievements — putting people on the moon — SpaceX is busy preparing for its next giant leap: sending humans to Mars.

To that end, the California-based aerospace company conducted a static-fire test of Starhopper, a prototype of its Mars-colonizing Starship vehicle, late Tuesday (July 16) in South Texas ahead of a planned test flight of the craft. (SpaceX performs such engine firings before all of its launches, to ensure that the relevant systems are ready to fly.)

The test, which lasted approximately 5 seconds, seemed to be successful, although bright orange flames engulfed the vehicle after its single Raptor engine fired. A video by the Everyday Astronaut's Tim Dodd shows the brilliant fireball in slow motion.

Crews were able to detank and power down Starhopper following the test fire. And on Wednesday morning (July 17), onlookers confirmed that the squat-looking silver prototype appeared unscathed.

 

-snip-

Read more: https://www.space.co...t-fireball.html


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#5169
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NASA’s large SLS rocket unlikely to fly before at least late 2021

"NASA has not been good at setting realistic budget and schedules."

ERIC BERGER - 7/17/2019, 12:40 PM


As recently as last month, both NASA planning documents and officials with Boeing said the space agency was still working toward a 2020 launch of the Artemis-1 mission. This is the first launch of the large, costly, and delayed Space Launch System rocket that NASA hopes will serve as the backbone for its efforts to explore the Moon and eventually Mars with humans.

This uncrewed test flight, which will boost an Orion capsule to the Moon, is the first of three main missions in NASA's Artemis campaign to land humans on the Moon by 2024. However, for the first time, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine on Wednesday foreclosed the possibility of a 2020 launch date.

Twice during testimony before the US Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, Bridenstine referenced 2021 as the expected launch date for Artemis-1. "I think 2021 is definitely achievable for the Artemis-1 launch vehicle," Bridenstine said in response to a question from Sen. Roger Wicker, the Mississippi Republican who chairs the committee.

However, Bridenstine said he would not set a new date for the mission yet. Last week, he reassigned two top officials in NASA's human spaceflight department, Bill Gerstenmaier and Bill Hill, in part because of cost overruns and delays with the SLS rocket's core stage. Bridenstine is now searching for replacements, both within and outside of NASA, to fill these key roles and assess the readiness of the SLS rocket.

"NASA has not been good at setting realistic budget and schedules, and we need to get better at that," Bridenstine said. "So before we announce a new date I want to be sure that we have a leadership team in place."

 


-snip-

Read more: https://arstechnica....east-late-2021/



#5170
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Trump’s hasty plan to get Americans back on the moon by 2024, explained

 

https://www.vox.com/...stine-explained

 

Extract:

 

(Vox) This week we will mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, and the first time a human being has stepped foot on the surface of a celestial body that is not our own. No human has been back to the moon since Apollo 17 in 1972. It’s fair to wonder: When are we going back?

 

…The mission is called “Artemis,” after the Greek goddess of the hunt and the moon, who is also the twin sister of Apollo. It’s a fitting name, as NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine has promised that the mission will deliver the first woman to the moon. All the Apollo astronauts in the 1960s and ’70s were white men.

 

…At ARS Technica, space reporter Eric Berger reports that the mission could cost an additional “$6 billion to $8 billion per year on top of NASA’s existing budget of about $20 billion.”

 

Where’s that money coming from? No one knows at the moment.

 

“At present we have a White House directive to land humans on the Moon in five years, but no plan, and no budget details on how to do so, and no integrated human space exploration roadmap laying out how we can best achieve the horizon goal, Mars,” Rep. Kendra Horn, the Oklahoma Democrat who chairs the House’s subcommittee on space and aeronautics, said during a recent committee hearing. “In essence, we’re flying blind.”

 


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#5171
Alislaws

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American kids would much rather be YouTubers than astronauts

Exactly 50 years ago today, a Saturn V rocket launched from Kennedy Space Center carrying Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins to the Moon. Four days later, Armstrong and Aldrin would land on the Moon and inspire a generation of young people to become scientists, engineers, and mathematicians.
The Apollo program's effect of inspiring America's children to pursue careers in STEM fields is one of the most powerful lasting legacies of the Moon race. Unfortunately, this effect seems to be coming to an end.
On the eve of the Apollo 11 anniversary, LEGO asked The Harris Poll to survey a total of 3,000 children in the United States, China, and the United Kingdom about their attitudes toward and knowledge of space. The results reveal that, at least for Western countries, kids today are more interested in YouTube than spaceflight.

 

In my day (haha!) a lot more people wanted to be filmstars/popstars/rockstars etc. than wanted to be astronauts as far as I remember. 

 

Being a youtuber means sitting around doing stuff you find fun or interesting and getting paid and famous for it, of course people want to do that.

 

Traditionally to be an astronaut the child needs to be very good academically and physically, (A child that was not extremely gifted might be delusional and still want to be an astronaut I guess?) or they won't be able to perform such a difficult and competitive role. 

 

Anyone can be a youtuber (you need a somewhat engaging manner I guess, but it feels approachable for everyone even if some socially awkward people might be terrible at it). 

 

Also we'll mostly use automated systems to do the actual exploration so astronauts will just be sitting around in bases on the moon/mars etc. rather than discovering new things, they can claim to be the first human who X but if thousands of robots have already done X its not so much fun. 



#5172
Jessica

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New measurements imply dramatically higher abundance of helium hydride ions in the early universe

by Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Physicists report the first laboratory measurements of electron reactions with helium hydride ions in the cryogenic storage ring CSR at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. At temperatures down to 6 K, the reaction rates destroying the molecule were found to be significantly lower compared to previous measurements at room temperature. This translates into a strongly enhanced abundance of this primordial molecule acting as a coolant for first star and galaxy formation in the early universe.

 

Just three minutes after the Big Bang, the chemical composition of the universe was settled: 75 percent hydrogen, 25 percent helium, and trace amounts of lithium, all created by primordial nucleosynthesis. However, in this early state, all matter was fully ionized, consisting of free bare nuclei and a hot electron gas, a "foggy" plasma for the cosmological background radiation.

 

https://phys.org/new...um-hydride.html


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#5173
caltrek

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German-Russian Astronomy Satellite Launches

 

https://www.skyandte...llite-launches/

 

Introduction:

 

(Sky & Telescope) The Spektrum-Röntgen-Gamma (Spektr-RG) satellite took to the skies on Saturday, July 13th, at 17:31 local time (12:31 UT). The Proton rocket carrying the spacecraft launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on the Kazakh Steppe in Russia.

 

The launch will set Spektr-RG on its way for the next three months, until it reaches a stable solar orbit 1.5 million kilometers (1 million miles) from Earth, on the opposite side from the Sun. From there, two telescopes — one German and one Russian — will carry out investigations of the X-ray universe.

 

The Telescopes

 

X-rays penetrate most materials — including mirrors — so focusing them requires a unique design. Both the German space agency’s Extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array (EROSITA) and the Russian Astronomical Roentgen Telescope - X-ray Concentrator (ART-XC) contain multiple modules of concentric mirror pairs. X-rays skip off two mirrors at grazing incidence angles, like smooth pebbles off a pond, coming to a focus on the X-ray detectors.

Each of EROSITA’s seven “eyes” contains 54 mirror pairs, nested inside each other like Russian dolls. These mirrors focus X-rays onto CCD detectors with 15-arcsecond resolution. Such images won’t have the sub-arcsecond quality of, say, a Hubble or Chandra image, but on the other hand the images will cover the entire X-ray sky. Indeed, EROSITA will survey the full sky not just once, but eight times over four years. Compared with the last all-sky survey, conducted with the ROSAT mission in the 1990s, EROSITA will have 20 to 25 times the sensitivity. It will discover sources never seen before — by the millions.

 

Primary Science Goal:

 

The primary science goal for EROSITA, and one of the targets of ART-XC, is to better characterize dark energy, the unknown force that’s determining the universe’s expansion rate and ultimate fate. EROSITA’s survey is expected to pick up 100,000 galaxy clusters, with which astronomers will study the nature of this mysterious force.

ero_allsky_rgb-600px.jpg

This simulated image shows what EROSITA will see in its all-sky survey. 
T. Dauser / Remeis-Observatory / FAU / EROSITA Team


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5174
caltrek

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Sky-surveying Telescopes Sweep Up Near-Earth Asteroids

 

https://www.skyandte...arth-asteroids/

 

Extract:

 

(Sky & Telescope) Finding and keeping track of near-Earth asteroids has become a top priority over the past few decades. And scientists have largely succeeded, cataloging more than 90% of kilometer-size or bigger rocks that come within 50 million kilometers (30 million miles) of Earth.

 

But there are far more smaller asteroids out there than big ones, and while they won’t cause extinction-level events, they can still cause significant damage. The Chelyabinsk meteor blast in 2013 damaged thousands of buildings and its blast exploded glass windows that injured some 1,500 people. Much of this smaller population of space rocks remains undiscovered, so astronomers have dedicated several telescopes to spotting the faint and fleet movements of nearby asteroids as they cross the sky. And those telescopes are striking it rich.

 

… two asteroid-hunting telescopes, the Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System (ATLAS) and the second Pan-STARRS telescope (PS2), worked together to find and calculate the entry path of a tiny, 4-meter space rock that ultimately burned up in Earth’s atmosphere.

 

The two Hawai‘i-based telescopes of ATLAS have discovered more than 300 near-Earth asteroids since the first telescope was fully deployed in 2015; a second telescope joined the first in 2017. The tally includes more than 30 potentially hazardous asteroids, whose orbits cross Earth’s. The asteroids ATLAS is designed to find are smaller — they’ll be discovered too late to deflect, but early warning of their arrival will allow evacuation of target areas.

 

ATLAS discovered its newest asteroid, designated 2019 MO, in the early morning hours of June 22nd. The space rock was initially given a modest impact rating of 2, but that was upgraded to a “likely” impact rating of 4 when astronomers located the asteroid using additional observations with PS2, located atop Haleakalā in Hawai‘i. Twelve hours later, the Nexrad weather radar in San Juan, Puerto Rico detected the low-frequency sound waves produced when the asteroid burned up in the atmosphere over the ocean.


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5175
caltrek

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Moon bricks could keep the lights on and the heat up in Lunar colonies

 

https://techcrunch.c...lunar-colonies/

 

Extract:

 

(Techcrunch) There may be no “dark side” of the Moon, but when and where it is dark, it’s dark — and stays that way for two weeks. If we’re going to have colonists up there, they’ll need to stay warm and keep the lights (among other things) on for the long lunar night. Turns out bricks made of Moon dust could be part of the solution.

 

Of course they will use the readily available solar power during the lunar day, and you might think that they could just charge up some batteries to last them through the night. But batteries are large and heavy — not the kind of thing you want to pack for a trip to the Moon.

 

…The one thing they’ll have a lot of up there is dust — lunar regolith, to be precise. And thanks to samples brought back by the Apollo missions, we’re pretty familiar with the stuff. So the team (the European Space Agency partnered with Azimut Space) simulated some using terrestrial materials to see what they could do with it.

 

“In this study, we used Earth rock with comparable properties to Moon rock, crushed into a powder until the particles matched the size of those in the lunar regolith,” said the ESA’s  Aidan Cowley, who oversaw the project.

 

The faux-regolith was compressed into bricks, which were then wired up and heated using current like what they might be able to pull from solar cells on the Moon’s surface. The brick was then placed in an imitation lunar environment — near-vacuum and around -150 degrees C — and hooked up to a system that could withdraw heat from the bricks and convert it to electricity.

Artificial_regolith_brick.jpg?w=730&crop


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5176
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Debate intensifies over speed of expanding universe

 

https://www.sciencem...anding-universe

 

Introduction:

 

(Science) This week, leading experts at clocking one of the most contested numbers in the cosmos—the Hubble constant, the rate at which the universe expands—gathered in hopes that new measurements could point the way out of a brewing storm in cosmology.

 

No luck so far. A hotly anticipated new cosmic yardstick, reliant on red giants, has served only to muddle the debate about the actual value of the constant, and other measurements brought no resolution. “It was the craziest conference I’ve been to,” said Daniel Scolnic, an astrophysicist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. “Everyone felt like they were on this rollercoaster.”

 

The meeting, at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara, California, was the latest episode in a saga stretching back to the 1920s, when Edwin Hubble established that the farther one looks into space, the faster galaxies are speeding away from Earth. Since then, scientists have devoted entire careers to refining the rate of that flow, Hubble’s eponymous constant, or H0. But recently, the problem has hardened into a transdisciplinary dispute.

 

On one side are cosmologists who gather data from the greatest distances, such as a map of the big bang’s afterglow recorded by the European satellite Planck. They compare the apparent size of features in that afterglow with their actual size, as predicted by theory, to calculate an H0 of about 67. That means distant galaxies should be flying away from the Milky Way 67 kilometers per second faster for every additional megaparsec astronomers gaze out into space.

 

But when astronomers look at actual galaxies, using delicate chains of inferences to make up for the universe’s frustrating lack of tick marks, they get a different number...an H0 of about 74...

ca_0726NID_Stars_online.jpg?itok=H_2-4gb

The peak brightness of red giants in distant galaxies represents a new way to calculate the Hubble constant.

ESA/HUBBLE & NASA


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5177
caltrek

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China has deorbited its experimental space station

 

https://www.theverge...l-space-station

 

Entire Article:

 

(The Verge A little over a year after its first space station crashed down over the Pacific Ocean, China has deorbited its second, the Tiangong-2. It entered Earth’s atmosphere and burned up over the South Pacific ocean on Friday.

 

Unlike the Tiangong-1 station’s uncontrolled descent, China deliberately brought the Tiangong-2 down to Earth in a controlled fashion over the Pacific, where there wasn’t any risk of it hitting people.

 

China launched the space station in September 2016, and quickly sent up a pair of taikonauts, Jing Haipeng and Chen Dong, to conduct a variety of experiments on a 30 day mission. China launched a second, uncrewed mission in April 2017 to refuel the station to test out a new spacecraft and conduct some “robotic demonstrations.” That was the last mission to the station, which was never intended as a permanent habitat in orbit.

 

While the station is no longer in orbit, it proved to be a useful project for China, which has been steadily working to gain a better foothold in space in the last decade. Along with the Tiangong-1, the two stations provided the Chinese space program with valuable experience in orbit. They demonstrated not only that they could launch and sustain hardware in space, but also dock crewed and uncrewed vehicles to them — vital lessons for any human spaceflight program. China had proposed a third station, the Tiangong-3, but it was never constructed or launched.

 

Tiangong-2’s deorbiting doesn’t mean that China’s ambitions in orbit are over. The country is planning on constructing another station in orbit, with the first section, the Tianhe-1 module, scheduled for launch in 2020.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5178
Jessica

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The Milky Way devoured another galaxy and we've spotted the remains
SPACE 22 July 2019

ESA_Gaia_StarHorse_galactic_bar_faceon.j

The Gaia space observatory showed us where the stars are – and some aren’t from here
Data: ESA/Gaia/DPAC, A. Khalatyan(AIP) & StarHorse team; Galaxy map: NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech)

By Leah Crane


Early in the Milky Way’s history, it devoured another, smaller galaxy and made that galaxy’s stars its own. Now, astronomers have pinpointed the timing of this monstrous meal and identified which stars make up the grisly remains.

Carme Gallart at the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands in Spain and her colleagues used data from the Gaia space observatory to determine the ages of nearly 600,000 stars in our galaxy. Some of those stars are in the “thick disk”, just above or below the main disk of the galaxy, and some are in the halo, a spherical structure that extends beyond the disk.

The halo sample contained two types of stars, one with more blue stars than the other. Previous work showed that the blue stars were originally part of a smaller galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus, also known as the “sausage galaxy”, which was absorbed by the Milky Way early in its history.

Gallart and her team found that these two groups of stars had similar ages. They were probably about three billion years old when the Milky Way devoured Gaia-Enceladus about 10 billion years ago. Some of the disk stars had similar properties to the halo stars, leading the researchers to infer that they had the same origin and the merger tossed some stars from the disk into the halo.

 



Read more: https://www.newscien.../#ixzz5uRDaMXKF

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#5179
Jessica

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Chandrayaan-2: India set to re-attempt Moon mission launch

https://www.bbc.com/...-india-49032603


9 hours ago

India is set to re-attempt the launch of its second lunar mission a week after it halted the scheduled blast-off due to a technical snag.

Chandrayaan-2 will be launched at 14:43 local time (09:13 GMT) on Monday, space agency Isro said.

It added the spacecraft was ready "to take a billion dreams to the Moon - now stronger than ever before".

The space agency hopes the $150m (£120m) mission will be the first to land on the Moon's south pole.
(snip)

 

 


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#5180
Jessica

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Elon and SpaceX Adding 4 More Raptor Engines to Super Heavy Rocket
Brian Wang | July 23, 2019
starshipstarhopper-730x430.jpg

10

Elon Musk indicated that the SpaceX Super Heavy Starship will have 41 raptor engines. This means that instead of 31 engines on the first stage super heavy there will be 35. There will be six engines on the second stage Starship.

 

https://www.nextbigf...avy-rocket.html


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