Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Space News and Discussions

space exploration aerospace engineering astronomy NASA SpaceX interstellar telescopes satellites Mars space

  • Please log in to reply
5295 replies to this topic

#5261
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,964 posts

Gigantic Chinese telescope opens to astronomers worldwide

 

https://www.nature.c...586-019-02790-3

 

Extract:

 

(Nature) The world’s largest single-dish radio observatory is preparing to open to astronomers around the world, ushering in an era of exquisitely sensitive observations that could help in the hunt for gravitational waves and probe the mysterious fleeting blasts of radiation known as fast radio bursts.

 

The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) in southern China has just passed a series of technical and performance assessments, and the Chinese government is expected to give the observatory the final green light to begin full operations at a review meeting scheduled for next month. “We do not see any roadblocks for the remaining transition,” says Di Li, the chief scientist of FAST. “I feel both excited and relieved.”

 

…The Chinese observatory’s massive size means that it can detect extremely faint radio-wave whispers from an array of sources across the Universe, such as the spinning cores of dead stars, known as pulsars, and hydrogen in distant galaxies. It will also explore a frontier in radioastronomy — using radio waves to locate exoplanets, which may harbour extraterrestrial life.

 

Since testing began in 2016, only Chinese scientists have been able to lead projects studying the telescope’s preliminary data. But now, observation time will be accessible to researchers from around the world, says Zhiqiang Shen, director of the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory and co-chair of the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ FAST supervisory committee.

 

…FAST examines only a tiny fraction of the sky at any one time, making it unlikely to discover many new FRBs, which are fleeting and occur in seemingly random locations. But the telescope’s “impressive sensitivity” will be useful for following up on sources in detail, says Laura Spitler, an astronomer at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany. Repeat observations could allow scientists to learn about the environment from which an FRB emerged, and to determine whether the blasts vary in energy or recur with any set pattern.

d41586-019-02790-3_17178384.jpg

FAST will enable highly sensitive measurements of astronomical phenomenon.

Credit: Ou Dongqu/Xinhua/ZUMA


  • Outlook, FrogCAT and Jessica like this

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5262
Outlook

Outlook

    Arab Muslim

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,181 posts
  • LocationBarbary Lands
Imagine skateboarding that.
  • caltrek and FrogCAT like this

Outlook's secret song of the ~week: https://youtu.be/DGe_Sluth3A


#5263
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,964 posts

Astronomers Expect to Start Finding Many More Interstellar Rocks

 

http://blogs.discove...ar-space-rocks/

 

Extract:

 

(Discover) (E)very year LSST  (Large Synoptic Survey Telescopes) could find a few ‘Oumuamua-sized objects, plus more than 100 interstellar rocks at least a yard wide, according to a new study posted to the preprint site arxiv.org and accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. And the number of interstellar visitors that astronomers find could offer new insights into our own solar system.

 

Swinging by

 

Planetary systems are more likely to kick objects out if they have massive planets, like Jupiter, sitting far from their suns. Like a spacecraft that swings by a planet, gets a gravity assist and ventures outward in the solar system, a rocky object can escape a star’s pull more easily if it swings by another massive object. The more massive the object and the farther it is from the star, the more likely the rocky object is to escape.

 

Current methods for finding exoplanets work best for worlds close to their stars. So, while astronomers have found many massive exoplanets, most tend to be very close to their suns — so-called “Hot Jupiters.” But recent observations of other solar systems hint that it should be common to find planets sitting farther from their suns.


  • Jessica likes this

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5264
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
Astronomers identify four globular cluster planetary nebulae candidates

by Tomasz Nowakowski , Phys.org

Astronomers from Chile and Argentina report the detection of four new planetary nebulae (PN) candidates residing in galactic globular clusters (GCs). If confirmed, the discovery would double the number of known PNe in galactic GCs. The finding is presented in a paper published September 19 on the arXiv pre-print server.

 

Planetary nebulae are expanding shells of gas and dust that have been ejected from a star during the process of its evolution from main sequence star into a red giant or white dwarf. They are relatively rare, but important for astronomers studying the chemical evolution of stars and galaxies.

 

https://phys.org/new...ry-nebulae.html



#5265
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
NASA lander captures marsquakes, other Martian sounds

by Marcia Dunn

NASA's InSight lander on Mars has captured the low rumble of marsquakes and a symphony of other otherworldly sounds.

 

Scientists released an audio sampling Tuesday. The sounds had to be enhanced for humans to hear.

InSight's seismometer has detected more than 100 events, but only 21 are considered strong marsquake candidates. The rest could be marsquakes—or something else. The French seismometer is so sensitive it can hear the Martian wind as well as movements by the lander's robot arm and other mechanical "dinks and donks " as the team calls them.

"It's been exciting, especially in the beginning, hearing the first vibrations from the lander," said Imperial College London's Constantinos Charalambous, who helped provide the audio recordings. "You're imagining what's really happening on Mars as InSight sits on the open landscape," he added in a statement.

 

https://phys.org/new...es-martian.html



#5266
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
India's Chandrayaan-2 Moon Probe Just Beamed Back Its 1st Lunar Science

By Meghan Bartels 9 hours ago

UJiiM38njmn2UB2DYWjfWZ-650-80.jpg

An artist's depiction of the Chandrayaan-2 orbiter studying the moon.(Image: © ISRO)


India's second-ever lunar orbiter arrived at the moon just over a month ago, and the probe's instruments have already begun sending home science data.

The Chandrayaan-2 mission launched in July and was designed to tackle a host of questions about the moon, with a particularly sharp eye to the water ice the spacecraft's predecessor spotted at the south pole. The current orbiter carries eight different instruments — and Indian scientists are already poring over some of the mission's very first science data.

The orbiter carries two cameras, both of which have been hard at work. The Terrain Mapping Camera began surveying the moon as soon as Chandrayaan-2 arrived in orbit. Now, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), which runs the mission, has also released images taken by a second instrument, the Orbiter High Resolution Camera.

That camera, according to ISRO, captures the most detailed images to date of the lunar surface from an orbiting spacecraft, and is able to catch features that are about 10 inches (25 centimeters) across. On Oct. 4, ISRO released photos the camera took on Sept. 5 of a crater called Boguslawsky E, located near the lunar south pole.

 



More:
https://www.space.co...ce=notification

  • caltrek likes this

#5267
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
Saturn overtakes Jupiter as planet with most moons in solar system

https://www.dw.com/e...stem/a-50731365

 

Saturn overtakes Jupiter as planet with most moons in solar system

Saturn has overtaken Jupiter as the solar system's planet with the most moons after scientists discovered 20 more orbiting the ringed-planet. Scientists on Monday said the 20 additional moons were discovered during the summer, bringing Saturn's total to 82 moons — pipping Jupiter's 79.

A team led by Scott Shephard of the Carnegie Institution for Science spotted Saturn's new moons using a telescope in Hawaii. The moons are tiny when compared to others, measuring just 5 kilometers (3 miles) in diameter.
(snip)

The Carnegie Institution for Science has now launched a public moon-naming competition for the newly discovered moons.

Mini-moons around planets are difficult to spot as more powerful telescopes are needed to find them. There may still be around 100 further moons waiting to be discovered around Saturn, according to Sheppard, but a larger telescope will be needed in the future to spot them.

 


  • eacao likes this

#5268
eacao

eacao

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 430 posts
  • LocationAustralia
I wonder if they’re all just icy bodies or whether they contain appreciable quantities of metals. 5km is a nice size for ISRU.
  • Jessica likes this

If you're going through hell, keep going. - Winston Churchill

You don't decide your future. You decide your habits, and your habits decide your future.
Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. - Abraham Lincoln.


#5269
eacao

eacao

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 430 posts
  • LocationAustralia

AN INTRO TO THE AUSTRALIAN SPACE SECTOR

 

CnPaBYs.jpg

 

 

The Australian Government, always ready to be the first on the scene, decided to birth an Australian Space Agency last year. Ahead of the game as they were, this fact was the talk of the town across the world for a moment and even got an honourable mention on this very forum. 

 

Our magnanimous Government, wanting to capitalise on their first mover advantage in space, have given these new space cadets a whopping $10m of funding (it's not long now until we're flying the Aussie banner throughout the galaxy). 

 

But paying homage to our colonial roots can't be done alone. Not even the Australian government is capable of pulling this stunt off all by themselves. No, they need industry (industry)(industry)

 

This is where the valiant Australian entrepreneurial class joins the party. Mr. Adam Gilmour is a real visionary and he's made a company. But not just any company, this unique company is doing something good. This maverick is building rockets. Not just any rockets--big bloody rockets. These bad boys will be launching some 400kg of unadulterated mass into Low Earth Orbit soon. Satellites, feathers, bricks, Bill shorten, doesn't matter. If it's made of protons and electrons it is compatible with One Vision (great name, I know). 

 

They tried to launch it on a suborbital hop recently and unfortunately it didn't work. Space is finicky like that I guess. Just gotta pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and have another go. And that's exactly what big dog Adam intends to do, the hero. He's looking to get his object into orbit before the end of 2020. Wow. 

 

When the Kiwis faked their space program and the launch of their Electron rocket, they told the world they had a team of 200 people. Bah! 3's a crowd mate. Gilmour Space Technologies managed to build their turbo with only 28 people. Really, 28 cobbers cobbled together the One Vision rocket in what looks like a high school metalworks shed. 

 

Gilmour-Space-Launch-System_0a6f.jpg

 

That rocket you see above is actually slated to be capable of launching a payload to orbit from anywhere in Australia. I guess that's why the Government has chosen to base Australia's Space Agency down in Adelaide, as far away from the equator as they could possibly challenge themselves with. Why not? Maybe they're worried the boat people would launch a daring raid to steal one of them.

 

But Gilmour isn't alone in this lucrative industry. There are more companies plopping out from idealistic CEOs across the nation. Myriota is a company that specialises in nanosats for the internet of things. Their sats might be little but big things are definitely afoot.

 

Let's just hope Adam can fulfil his ambitious plans to develop human-rated systems and land people on Mars before his competition picks up their game. Elon Musk, eat your heart out.

 

Edit:

I just found out that Adam, being the gallant titan of industry that he is, left his old life behind and sold his strawberry farm to start this space company. What a legend, the Australian dream at its finest. 


  • Jessica likes this

If you're going through hell, keep going. - Winston Churchill

You don't decide your future. You decide your habits, and your habits decide your future.
Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. - Abraham Lincoln.


#5270
wjfox

wjfox

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,705 posts
  • LocationLondon
Humans will not 'migrate' to other planets, Nobel winner says
 
OCTOBER 9, 2019
 
Humans will never migrate to a planet outside of Earth's solar system because it would take far too long to get there, Swiss Nobel laureate Michel Mayor said Wednesday.
 
Mayor and his colleague Didier Queloz were on Tuesday awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for their research refining techniques to detect so-called exoplanets.
 
"If we are talking about exoplanets, things should be clear: we will not migrate there," Mayor told AFP near Madrid on the sidelines of a conference when asked about the possibility of humans moving to other planets.
 
"These planets are much, much too far away. Even in the very optimistic case of a livable planet that is not too far, say a few dozen light years, which is not a lot, it's in the neighbourhood, the time to go there is considerable," he added.
 
"We are talking about hundreds of millions of days using the means we have available today. We must take care of our planet, it is very beautiful and still absolutely liveable."
 


#5271
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
Study suggests ice on lunar south pole may have more than one source

by Kevin Stacey, Brown University

The discovery of ice deposits in craters scattered across the Moon's south pole has helped to renew interest in exploring the lunar surface, but no one is sure exactly when or how that ice got there. A new study published in the journal Icarus suggests that while a majority of those deposits are likely billions of years old, some may be much more recent.

 

Ariel Deutsch, a graduate student in Brown University's Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences and the study's lead author, says that constraining the ages of the deposits is important both for basic science and for future lunar explorers who might make use of that ice for fuel and other purposes.

"The ages of these deposits can potentially tell us something about the origin of the ice, which helps us understand the sources and distribution of water in the inner solar system," Deutsch said. "For exploration purposes, we need to understand the lateral and vertical distributions of these deposits to figure out how best to access them. These distributions evolve with time, so having an idea of the age is important."

 

https://phys.org/new...ole-source.html



#5272
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,964 posts

Star Systems Found to Be ‘Baby-Proof’ for Newborn Planets

 

https://www.courthou...ewborn-planets/

 

Extract:

 

(Courthouse News) – Astronomers have learned how energy inside gaseous, dust-filled disks surrounding stars help prevent young planets from smashing into the stars they orbit, according to a study released Thursday.

 

...The inner disk, called the silicate sublimation front, contains a heavy gas that when interacting with a planet’s thinner gas forms a dense barrier from the star, the study found.

 

“As a young Super-Earth travels through the gas, it is typically accompanied by gas co-rotating with the planet on an orbital path similar to a horseshoe,” the researchers said in a statement. “As the planet drifts inward and reaches the silicate sublimation front, the gas particles moving from the hot thinner gas to the denser gas outside the boundary give the planet a small kick.”

BabyproofStarSystems.jpg?resize=1000%2C7

Astronomers with the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy have learned how gaseous, dust-filled energy surrounding sun-like stars prevents young planets from falling into them while in orbit.

(Courtesy of MPIA Graphics Department)


  • Jessica likes this

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5273
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,964 posts

Small satellite launcher Virgin Orbit announces plans to send tiny vehicles to Mars

 

https://www.theverge...e-satrevolution

 

Introduction:

 

(The Verge) Virgin Orbit has big plans to send small spacecraft to Mars, as soon as 2022. The company — an offshoot of Richard Branson’s space tourism company Virgin Galactic — announced today that it is partnering with nearly a dozen Polish universities and a Polish satellite maker called SatRevolution to design up to three robotic missions to the Red Planet over the next decade.

 

If successful, these missions could be the first purely commercial trips to Mars. Up until now, only four organizations have ever successfully made it to the Red Planet, and all of them have been government-led space organizations. Commercial companies like SpaceX have vowed to send spacecraft to Earth’s neighbor, but so far, Mars has been the sole domain of nation-states. “It’s still a pretty small club, and none of them have been something quite like this where it’s a consortium of companies and universities,” Will Pomerantz, the vice president of special projects at Virgin Orbit, tells The Verge. Plus, all of these space agency vehicles have typically been large — comparable to the size of buses and cars.

 

But the Virgin Orbit team was inspired to take on this endeavor thanks to NASA’s recent InSight mission, which sent a lander to Mars in November of 2018. When the InSight lander launched, two small standardized spacecraft the size of cereal boxes — known as CubeSats — launched along with it, and traveled all the way to Mars trailing behind the vehicle. It marked the first time that CubeSats, or any small spacecraft of that size, had journeyed beyond the orbit of Earth and out into deep space. The pair of satellites performed exactly as intended, relaying signals from InSight back to Earth, proving that small satellites could be valuable on deep space missions for very low costs.

Virgin_Orbit_88.0.jpg


  • eacao and Jessica like this

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#5274
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
First man to conduct spacewalk, Alexei Leonov, dies

by Marina Lapenkova

Alexei Leonov, a legendary Soviet cosmonaut who was the first man to perform a spacewalk in 1965, died in Moscow on Friday aged 85 after a long illness.

 

The Russian space agency Roscosmos said it was saddened to announce the death of "cosmonaut No 11" who was twice decorated with the country's top honour, the Hero of the Soviet Union.

Tributes poured in from across the globe, with Western space agencies and experts praising Leonov's contribution and admirers bidding him farewell.

"This is a loss for the whole planet," said Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko.

Leonov's assistant Natalia Filimonova told AFP that he died at Moscow's Burdenko hospital after a long illness.

 

https://phys.org/new...eonov-died.html



#5275
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
NASA launches satellite to mysterious zone where Earth meets space

https://www.dw.com/e...pace/a-50788348

 


NASA launched a satellite Thursday to explore the ionosphere, a mysterious part of Earth's atmosphere on the edge of space.

The satellite shot into orbit from a plane flying over the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of the US state of Florida.

The satellite called Icon, or Ionospheric Connection Explorer, will transmit data intended to help scientists understand the "physical processes at work where Earth's atmosphere interacts with near-Earth space," NASA said.

Research by scientists at NASA has identified this region of "near space" as being in constant flux from solar storms above and weather below.

According to NASA, the ionosphere is a fluctuating layer of electrons and charged atoms and molecules ranging from 48 kilometers (30 miles) above the Earth's surface to 965 kilometers (600 miles) above the ground at the edge of space.
(snip)

NASA said the Icon the satellite will transmit data intended to help scientists understand the "physical processes at work where Earth's atmosphere interacts with near-Earth space."

 


  • Yuli Ban and caltrek like this

#5276
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
Ground-based Hypertelescope Has First Operational Components
Brian Wang | October 12, 2019
hyperscope-730x430.jpg

Ground-based hypertelecope project has first images from a suspended camera and light from mirrors.
 

They acquired the star Vega in the camera of the nacelle, for about twenty minutes, from one of the two mirrors on the ground. The image shows Vega in the center of the field of 1mn of arc, and part of its light forming the image of the North mirror in the upper left, used to check the orientation of the nacelle. They motorized the micrometric screws supporting the mirror (made by the Loma laboratory) and the training work on their flathead mounting in Calern last winter and spring that made this success possible.

A first prototype of a ground-based Hypertelescope type “Carlina” is currently under study in France in the Ubaye Valley in the Alps of Haute Provence. When it is completed, it will be 200 meters in diameter. With 800 mirrors 15 centimeter, it will accumulate two times more of collecting area than the Hubble Space Telescope and have visual acuity almost one hundred times greater. It will be five times as powerful in resolution that the future european E-ELT which will have a 39-meter in diameter whose construction is scheduled for 2024 by ESO to the Chile.

hyperscopefrance-1024x445.jpg

Drone-Hypertelescope-2016-1024x576.jpg

It is planned to install and operate several optical nacelles on the same hypertelescope. This will make it possible to make simultaneous observations of different stars in strictly identical technical conditions. Each new nacelle installed will therefore add a new telescope to the telescope already in service, and at an incredibly low cost – that of an optical nacelle. Such a hypertelescope will therefore also be a multi-telescope.

The hypertelescope lends itself to a scalable modular installation. From the first group of installed mirrors, it will be able to produce scientific results. Well before the complete completion of the installation.

The current prototype model will consist of a set of floor mirrors totaling already a diameter of 57 meters. The concept being scalable, it will in principle make it possible to enlarge the diameter of the diluted mirror to 200 meters, which would give it a resolution of 0.5 milliseconds of arc, which is 80 times better than the Hubble Space Telescope when the effect of atmospheric turbulence will be corrected by an adaptive optics system.

 

https://www.nextbigf...components.html


  • Yuli Ban likes this

#5277
wjfox

wjfox

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,705 posts
  • LocationLondon
NASA unveils new spacesuit for next Moon landing
 
16 October 2019
 
The US space agency has unveiled the prototype for a new spacesuit that could be worn by the next astronauts on the Moon.
 
Nasa chief Jim Bridenstine shared a close-up look at the next-generation suits for the agency's Artemis programme.
 
The xEMU prototype suit looks similar to ones used at the International Space Station.
 
But Nasa said it had been improved for comfort, fit and mobility on the Moon.
 
 
 
_109254908_48905768626_47dac4690e_k.jpg


#5278
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
Mars InSight's 'mole' is moving again

by Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA's InSight spacecraft has used its robotic arm to help its heat probe, known as "the mole," dig nearly 2 centimeters (3/4 of an inch) over the past week. While modest, the movement is significant: Designed to dig as much as 16 feet (5 meters) underground to gauge the heat escaping from the planet's interior, the mole has only managed to partially bury itself since it started hammering in February 2018.

 

The recent movement is the result of a new strategy, arrived at after extensive testing on Earth, which found that unexpectedly strong soil is holding up the mole's progress. The mole needs friction from surrounding soil in order to move: Without it, recoil from its self-hammering action will cause it to simply bounce in place. Pressing the scoop on InSight's robotic arm against the mole, a new technique called "pinning," appears to provide the probe with the friction it needs to continue digging.

Since Oct. 8, 2019, the mole has hammered 220 times over three separate occasions. Images sent down from the spacecraft's cameras have shown the mole gradually progressing into the ground. It will take more time—and hammering—for the team to see how far the mole can go.

 

https://phys.org/new...sight-mole.html



#5279
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
A crisis in cosmology: New data suggests the universe expanding more rapidly than believed

by W. M. Keck Observatory

A group of astronomers led by University of California, Davis has obtained new data that suggest the universe is expanding more rapidly than predicted.

 

The study comes on the heels of a hot debate over just how fast the universe is ballooning; measurements thus far are in disagreement.

The team's new measurement of the Hubble Constant, or the expansion rate of the universe, involved a different method. They used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in combination with W. M. Keck Observatory's Adaptive Optics (AO) system to observe three gravitationally-lensed systems. This is the first time ground-based AO technology has been used to obtain the Hubble Constant.

"When I first started working on this problem more than 20 years ago, the available instrumentation limited the amount of useful data that you could get out of the observations," says co-author Chris Fassnacht, Professor of Physics at UC Davis. "In this project, we are using Keck Observatory's AO for the first time in the full analysis. I have felt for many years that AO observations could contribute a lot to this effort."

 

https://phys.org/new...y-believed.html



#5280
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
First identification of a heavy element born from neutron star collision

by ESO

For the first time, a freshly made heavy element, strontium, has been detected in space, in the aftermath of a merger of two neutron stars. This finding was observed by ESO's X-shooter spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and is published today in Nature. The detection confirms that the heavier elements in the Universe can form in neutron star mergers, providing a missing piece of the puzzle of chemical element formation.

 

In 2017, following the detection of gravitational waves passing the Earth, ESO pointed its telescopes in Chile, including the VLT, to the source: a neutron star merger named GW170817. Astronomers suspected that, if heavier elements did form in neutron star collisions, signatures of those elements could be detected in kilonovae, the explosive aftermaths of these mergers. This is what a team of European researchers has now done, using data from the X-shooter instrument on ESO's VLT.

Following the GW170817 merger, ESO's fleet of telescopes began monitoring the emerging kilonova explosion over a wide range of wavelengths. X-shooter in particular took a series of spectra from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. Initial analysis of these spectra suggested the presence of heavy elements in the kilonova, but astronomers could not pinpoint individual elements until now.

 

https://phys.org/new...rn-neutron.html







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: space exploration, aerospace engineering, astronomy, NASA, SpaceX, interstellar, telescopes, satellites, Mars, space

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users