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#101
Craven

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I think they would have to go around working metal at first, maybe they should grow coral-like things in prepared scaffoldings to get needed tools? Fire is incredibly useful, small compact high-heat source you can control, underwater magma is nowhere near in terms of user-friendliness. Anyway - yeah, great dolphin-octopi war would be very useful.
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#102
Keitaro2011

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Well, fuck! What are we waiting for?! Let's get a melt-probe up there already!!
It's apparent to me that a lot of people seem to want to prove why a technology is not possible, rather than think of ingenious ways to make something possible. It's my conviction that when someone says something is "impossible," what they really mean is "our current level of science cannot explain this, and I don’t have the motivation to explore beyond its boundaries." -Richard Obousy

#103
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Energy company wants to be first to mine the moon

Shackleton begins fund raising to start moon mining project.

By Layer 8 on Thu, 11/17/11 - 11:41am.

By 2020, the Shackleton Energy Company says it intends to be operating the world's first lunar base and propellant depot for all manner of spacecraft.

To make this ambitious plan possible, the company this week said it had begun its initial fundraising campaign via a company called RocketHub which defines itself as a crowdfunding outfit that helps raise money for a variety of entrepreneurial pursuits.

Shackleton stated that after a phase of robotic prospecting, its crews will establish the infrastructure in space and basecamps in the lunar polar crater regions to supervise industrial machinery for mining, processing and transporting lunar products to market in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and beyond. The company said it will use a mix of industrial astronauts and advanced robotic systems to provide a strategically-assured, continuous supply of propellants for spacecraft.

Read more -- http://www.networkwo....irst-mine-moon

Press release -- http://www.shackleto...ase11092011.pdf


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#104
mic of orion

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Extra Giant Planet May Have Dwelled in Our Solar System
Within our solar system, an extra giant planet, or possibly two, might once have accompanied Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Uranus.

Computer models showing how our solar system formed suggested the planets once gravitationally slung one another across space, only settling into their current orbits over the course of billions of years.

During more than 6,000 simulations of this planetary scattering phase, planetary scientist David Nesvorny at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo., found that a solar system that began with four giant planets only had a 2.5 percent chance of leading to the orbits presently seen now. These systems would be too violent in their youth to end up resembling ours, most likely resulting in systems that have less than four giants over time, Nesvorny found.

Instead, a model about 10 times more likely at matching our current solar system began with five giants, including a now lost world comparable in mass to Uranus and Neptune. This extra planet may have been an "ice giant" rich in icy matter just like Uranus and Neptune, Nesvorny explained.

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http://www.space.com...lar-system.html

Edited by mic of orion, 19 November 2011 - 07:36 PM.

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#105
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First private-sector space station docking delayed

http://www.theregist...ay_funding_cut/

The first private-sector mission to carry supplies to the International Space Station (ISS) has been delayed, according to reports. Meanwhile NASA funding for such contracted-out missions is to be cut back.

The Wall Street Journal reports on the problems facing the nascent US space-launch private sector, saying that the mould-breaking startup rocket firm, SpaceX, now doesn't expect to send its first supply ship to the ISS until well into next year - perhaps as late as April. The launch had been expected before the end of this year.

According to the WSJ's sources, the delays are the result of engineers needing to modify control software aboard the Dragon capsule which is intended to dock automatically with the ISS to deliver a load of supplies to the orbiting station. The Dragon would be launched atop a Falcon 9 rocket stack, also supplied by SpaceX.


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#106
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Birth of Famous Black Hole: Longstanding Mysteries About Object Called Cygnus X-1 Unraveled

ScienceDaily (Nov. 17, 2011) — For the first time, astronomers have produced a complete description of a black hole, a concentration of mass so dense that not even light can escape its powerful gravitational pull. Their precise measurements have allowed them to reconstruct the history of the object from its birth some six million years ago.

http://www.scienceda...11117144045.htm


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#107
Craven

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Extremally interesting. It's just 15 times as massive as our Sun, and they say it's "one of the most massive stellar black holes in the Milky Way". That's big surprise for me as there are lots of stars 30-100 times as massive as Sun, and since supermassive black hole at center of our galaxy has mass of ~4,000,000 suns. Also I didn't know there are more ways to get black hole thank star's collapse.

Edited by Craven, 20 November 2011 - 09:40 PM.

"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#108
mic of orion

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Extremally interesting. It's just 15 times as massive as our Sun, and they say it's "one of the most massive stellar black holes in the Milky Way". That's big surprise for me as there are lots of stars 30-100 times as massive as Sun, and since supermassive black hole at center of our galaxy has mass of ~4,000,000 suns. Also I didn't know there are more ways to get black hole thank star's collapse.


stellar black holes tend to have smaller mass, between 3.8 and 200 solar mass, middle weight black holes are around 200-100 000 sollar masses...

Edited by mic of orion, 20 November 2011 - 10:08 PM.

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#109
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Alien Planet Count Tops 700 Distant Worlds

Less than 20 years after discovering the first world beyond our solar system, astronomers have bagged alien planet number 700.

As of today (Nov. 18), the tally stands at 702 exoplanets, according to the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopedia, a database compiled by astrobiologist Jean Schneider of the Paris-Meudon Observatory.

Schneider's list is one of two main alien-world trackers out there. The other is called "PlanetQuest: New Worlds Atlas," run by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. PlanetQuest's current count stands at 687; the difference between the two databases highlights the uncertainties involved in exoplanet detection and confirmation.

Regardless, both tallies have been growing quickly lately. And both will add hundreds, or perhaps thousands, of new alien planets in the near future.

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http://www.space.com...er-mission.html
It's dangerous to be right, when your government is wrong.
They that can give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.

#110
Keitaro2011

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Energy company wants to be first to mine the moon

Shackleton begins fund raising to start moon mining project.

By Layer 8 on Thu, 11/17/11 - 11:41am.

By 2020, the Shackleton Energy Company says it intends to be operating the world's first lunar base and propellant depot for all manner of spacecraft.

To make this ambitious plan possible, the company this week said it had begun its initial fundraising campaign via a company called RocketHub which defines itself as a crowdfunding outfit that helps raise money for a variety of entrepreneurial pursuits.

Shackleton stated that after a phase of robotic prospecting, its crews will establish the infrastructure in space and basecamps in the lunar polar crater regions to supervise industrial machinery for mining, processing and transporting lunar products to market in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and beyond. The company said it will use a mix of industrial astronauts and advanced robotic systems to provide a strategically-assured, continuous supply of propellants for spacecraft.

Read more -- http://www.networkwo....irst-mine-moon

Press release -- http://www.shackleto...ase11092011.pdf


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Mining the moon, eh? That sounds ambitious.
It's apparent to me that a lot of people seem to want to prove why a technology is not possible, rather than think of ingenious ways to make something possible. It's my conviction that when someone says something is "impossible," what they really mean is "our current level of science cannot explain this, and I don’t have the motivation to explore beyond its boundaries." -Richard Obousy

#111
mic of orion

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NASA to Launch Mars Rover 'Dream Machine' This Week


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After nearly a decade of planning, several cost overruns and a two-year delay, NASA is finally set to launch its next Mars rover this week.

The car-size Curiosity rover, the centerpiece of NASA's $2.5 billion Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, is slated to blast off from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Saturday (Nov. 26) after a one-day delay due to a rocket battery issue. The launch comes two years later than the MSL team had originally planned, a slip that ultimately increased the mission's lifetime costs by 56 percent.

But with Curiosity now sitting on the pad, nestled atop its Atlas 5 rocket, MSL's past issues are receding deeper into history. Most eyes are now on the rover's future — its quest to determine if Mars is, or ever was, capable of supporting microbial life.

"This is a Mars scientist's dream machine," Ashwin Vasavada, MSL deputy project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., told reporters on Nov. 10. "This rover is not only the most technically capable rover ever sent to another planet, but it's actually the most capable scientific explorer we've ever sent out." [Photos: NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Rover]

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A beast of a rover

NASA began planning MSL's mission in 2003. Over the past eight years, scientists and engineers developed, built and tested Curiosity, a robotic behemoth that will take planetary exploration to a new level.

At 1 ton, Curiosity weighs five times more than each of its immediate Mars rover predecessors, the golf-cart-size twins Spirit and Opportunity, which landed on the Red Planet in January 2004 to search for signs of past water activity.

While Spirit and Opportunity each sported five scientific instruments, Curiosity boasts 10, as well as a drill that will allow it to access the interior of Red Planet rocks.

The huge rover will use all of this gear to gauge the past and present habitability of its Martian environs. It will look for carbon-containing compounds — the building blocks of life as we know it — and assess what the Red Planet was like long ago.

MSL is not a life-detection mission, but it will lay the foundation for future efforts that could hunt for evidence of microbial Martians, officials said.

"We bridge the gap from 'follow the water' to seeking the signs of life," said Doug McCuistion, head of NASA's Mars exploration program.

A long cruise to Mars, and a novel descent

Friday's launch will kick off an 8 1/2-month cruise to Mars, with the MSL spacecraft arriving at the Red Planet in August 2012.

All planetary landings make mission scientists and managers sweat a little bit, but Curiosity's will likely be more nerve-wracking than most. A rocket-powered sky crane will lower the huge rover to the Martian surface on cables — a method that has never been tried before.

The sky crane performed well in full-up computer simulations, so it should work on the Red Planet, officials said.

"Entry, descent and landing is always an exciting time and a challenging time," said MSL project manager Pete Theisinger of JPL. "We're confident in our ability to do it successfully at the planet, but it is clearly not risk-free."


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Checking out Gale Crater


Curiosity will touch down at Gale Crater, a 100-mile-wide (150 kilometers) hole in the ground with a mysterious 3-mile-high (5 km) mountain rising from its center. The rover will poke around Gale, scrutinizing and sampling the dirt and rocks it encounters.

Curiosity's mission is designed to last for about two Earth years, but it wouldn't be a shock if the rover kept chugging along for significantly longer, officials said. Spirit and Opportunity, after all, far outlasted their planned three-month mission lifetimes. NASA just declared Spirit dead this year, and Opportunity is still cruising around Mars, checking out a huge crater called Endeavour.

"We do test all the mechanism equipment for three times its normal life," Theisinger said. If all goes well, he added, "we should be good for quite an extended period of time."

And Curiosity is powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators — which produce electricity from the radioactive decay of plutonium — rather than solar cells. The rover should thus be able to handle the harsh Martian winters well, Theisinger said.

So NASA officials expect Friday's launch to mark the start of something big.

"We'll excite the nation, we'll inspire the nation. We're going to show incredible new vistas, great new discoveries," McCuistion said. "The launch is just the beginning."

http://www.space.com...aunch-week.html

Edited by mic of orion, 21 November 2011 - 09:08 PM.

It's dangerous to be right, when your government is wrong.
They that can give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.

#112
wjfox

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Signal picked up from Russia's stranded Mars probe

Contact has finally been made with Russia's troubled Mars mission, says the European Space Agency (Esa).

The agency reports that its tracking station in Perth, Australia, picked up a signal from the Phobos-Grunt probe.

Esa is now working with Russian engineers to see how best to maintain communications with the craft.

Phobos-Grunt has been stuck in Earth orbit since its launch on 9 November, unable to fire the engine that would take it on to Mars.

It raises the hope that Russian controllers can establish what is wrong with the spacecraft and fix it.

Phobos-Grunt still has a short window in which to start its journey before a change in the alignment of the planets produces a gap between the Red Planet and Earth that is too big to cross.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-15850516


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#113
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Most liveable alien worlds ranked

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-15863549

#114
Craven

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Whilst cool it's clearly misleading and arbitrary.
"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#115
wjfox

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Pluto's hidden ocean

When NASA's New Horizons cruises by Pluto in 2015, the images it captures could help astronomers determine if an ocean is hiding under the frigid surface, opening the door to new possibilities for liquid water to exist on other bodies in the solar system. New research has not only concluded such an ocean is likely, but also has highlighted features the spacecraft could identify that could help confirm an ocean’s existence.

http://www.physorg.c....den-ocean.html


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#116
mic of orion

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Want to Find Aliens? Look for More than Just Earth-Like Planets

http://www.space.com...th-planets.html

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When searching for alien planets that could host extraterrestrial life, scientists should broaden their minds beyond "Earth-like planets," researchers say.

To date, more than 700 alien planets have been discovered beyond our solar system, and scientists are eager to know if any of them harbor life. In a new study, astrobiologists propose two new planetary rating systems that could make it easier to denote potentially habitable worlds.

One of the new scales, called the Earth Similarity Index (ESI), would take the traditional tack and categorize a planet's likeness to our own. This makes sense, the researchers say, because Earth is still the only known planet to host life, so other worlds that resemble Earth are good bets in the search for extraterrestrials.

"As a practical matter, interest in exoplanets is going to focus initially on the search for terrestrial, Earth-like planets," explained study leader, Dirk Schulze-Makuch, an astrobiologist at Washington State University, in a statement. "With that in mind, we propose an Earth Similarity Index which provides a quick screening tool with which to detect exoplanets most similar to Earth."



But the researchers also propose a second scale, called the Planetary Habitability Index (PHI), which would take into account a range of chemical and physical parameters thought to be conducive to life in more extreme conditions not found on Earth.

"Our proposed PHI is informed by chemical and physical parameters that are conducive to life in general," Schulze-Makuch and his colleagues write in a paper published in the journal Astrobiology. "It relies on factors that, in principle, could be detected at the distance of exoplanets from Earth, given currently planned future (space) instrumentation.”

Limiting the search for life to planets that share a lot in common with Earth potentially restricts the field too narrowly, the researchers argue.

"Habitability in a wider sense is not necessarily restricted to water as a solvent or to a planet circling a star," the paper’s authors write. "For example, the hydrocarbon lakes on Titan could host a different form of life. Analog studies in hydrocarbon environments on Earth, in fact, clearly indicate that these environments are habitable in principle. Orphan planets wandering free of any central star could likewise conceivably feature conditions suitable for some form of life."

Edited by mic of orion, 24 November 2011 - 10:21 PM.

It's dangerous to be right, when your government is wrong.
They that can give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.

#117
Ru1138

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Has anyone else heard of the Open Space Movement? http://www.facebook....2693305?sk=info I would have linked to their home site but it's having some problems right now.

What difference does it make?


#118
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#119
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Little hope for stuck Phobos Grunt probe

The Russian space agency has conceded there is now little chance of reviving its Mars mission, Phobos-Grunt.

The probe has been stuck circling the Earth since its launch on 9 November, unable to fire the engine that would take it on to the Red Planet.

Engineers have tried in vain to contact the spacecraft, and Roscosmos deputy head Vitaliy Davydov said the situation now looked very grim.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-15841896

:(

#120
Keitaro2011

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Might be just a re-upload of old news, but it appears to be from just 2 days ago.

If it's new, then it would seem Gliese 581g is confirmed!


It's apparent to me that a lot of people seem to want to prove why a technology is not possible, rather than think of ingenious ways to make something possible. It's my conviction that when someone says something is "impossible," what they really mean is "our current level of science cannot explain this, and I don’t have the motivation to explore beyond its boundaries." -Richard Obousy





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: space exploration, aerospace engineering, astronomy, NASA, SpaceX, interstellar, telescopes, satellites, Mars, space

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