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3D Printing News and Discussions


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#381
Sciencerocks

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Neutrogena tech produces user-specific 3D-printed facial masks

When it comes to hydrating facial skin, along with delivering nutrients to it, ready-made "sheet masks" have become quite popular. Neutrogena is now taking the concept further – its MaskiD system fabricates 3D-printed masks that are customized to the shape and needs of each client's face.

 

https://newatlas.com...eet-mask/57885/



#382
caltrek

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3D-printed guns may be more dangerous to their users than targets

 

https://theconversat...-targets-103724

 

Introducion:

(The Conversation) Despite fears that guns made with 3D printers will let criminals and terrorists easily make untraceable, undetectable plastic weapons at home, my own experience with 3D manufacturing quality control suggests that, at least for now, 3D-printed firearms may pose as much, or maybe even more, of a threat to the people who try to make and use them.

 

One firearms expert suggested that even the best 3D-printed guns might only fire “five shots [before] blowing up in your hand.” A weapon with a design or printing defect might blow up or come apart in its user’s hand before firing even a single bullet.

 

As someone who uses 3D printing in his work and researches quality assurance technologies, I’ve had the opportunity to see numerous printing defects and analyze what causes them. The problem is not with the concept of 3D printing, but with the exact process followed to create a specific item. Consumer 3D printers don’t always create high-quality items, and regular people aren’t likely to engage in rigorous quality assurance testing before using a 3D-printed firearm.

 

Problems are common at home

 

Many consumer 3D printers experience a variety of glitches, causing defects in the items they make. At times, an object detaches from the platform it’s on while being made, ending up lopsided, broken or otherwise damaged. Flaws can be much harder to detect when the flow of filament – the melted plastic material the item is being made from – is too hot or cold or too fast or slow, or stops when it shouldn’t. Even with all of the settings right, sometimes 3D-printed objects still have defects.

file-20190104-32121-bfd1x4.jpg?ixlib=rb-

A company called Defense Distributed developed a 3D-printed gun called the Liberator, which many fear could pass through security checkpoints undetected. 

AP Photo/Eric Gay


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#383
Sciencerocks

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3-D printing 100 times faster with light

by University of Michigan

 

Rather than building up plastic filaments layer by layer, a new approach to 3-D printing lifts complex shapes from a vat of liquid at up to 100 times faster than conventional 3-D printing processes, University of Michigan researchers have shown.

3-D printing could change the game for relatively small manufacturing jobs, producing fewer than 10,000 identical items, because it would mean that the objects could be made without the need for a mold costing upwards of $10,000. But the most familiar form of 3-D printing, which is sort of like building 3-D objects with a series of 1D lines, hasn't been able to fill that gap on typical production timescales of a week or two.

"Using conventional approaches, that's not really attainable unless you have hundreds of machines," said Timothy Scott, U-M associate professor of chemical engineering who co-led the development of the new 3-D printing approach with Mark Burns, the T.C. Chang Professor of Engineering at U-M.

 

https://techxplore.c...1-d-faster.html


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#384
Sciencerocks

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Gizmag
‏ @gizmag
54m54 minutes ago

3D-printed internet-connected bike gets 140-grand pricetag - https://gizm.ag/2DewuS0



#385
caltrek

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Aerospace startup planning to make 3D-printed rockets

 

https://www.theverge...naveral-florida

 

Extract:

(The Verge) America’s busiest spaceport in Cape Canaveral, Florida, is about to get a new tenant: a startup that shares SpaceX’s ambitious plans of turning humans into a multiplanetary species. The new occupant is LA-based launch provider Relativity Space, a company that wants to revolutionize how rockets are manufactured through the use of fully automated 3D printing. The company will soon have its very own launch site at the Cape for its future 3D-printed vehicles.

 

…Relativity’s goal is to disrupt the entire process of manufacturing rockets. “For the last 60 years, the way rockets have been built hasn’t really changed,” says Ellis. Instead of relying on the traditional, complicated assembly line of machines and people sculpting and piecing together parts of a vehicle, Relativity wants to make building a rocket almost entirely automated. The trick? Using giant 3D printers that can create all of the parts needed to build a rocket — from the engines to the propellant tanks and structure.

 

At the company’s Los Angeles headquarters, Relativity has the largest metal 3D printer by volume, a machine that’s capable of creating parts that are up to 20 feet tall and 10 feet wide. It’s called Stargate, another nod to Starcraft, and the team designed this printer from scratch, which means they can scale it up if needed. Ellis says that by relying on printers like this for manufacturing, the team will be able to produce about 95 percent of the rocket through 3D-printed automation. The last 5 percent still requires human labor. Most of that human interaction will be centered on testing, shipping, and very small amounts of manual assembly.

Stargate_5.jpg

Relativity’s Stargate 3D printer at the company’s LA headquarters.

 Photo: Relativity Space


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#386
caltrek

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Atomic-scale hardening mechanisms apply on larger scales in ‘architected’ materials

 

https://www.nature.c...586-019-00042-y

 

Introdcution:

Quote

(Nature) Atomic-scale mechanisms that affect the structural properties of materials can also inform the design of new materials needed for engineering, such as high-performance alloys. In a paper in Nature, Pham et al. report their use of 3D printing to translate some atomic-level hardening mechanisms typically found in crystalline materials to a larger scale. The resulting ‘architected’ materials contain substructures that are designed to mimic atomic arrangements in crystal lattices. Their work provides a fresh approach for developing designer materials and could facilitate the application of hardening mechanisms to different materials and on different scales.

d41586-019-00042-y_16392262.jpg


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#387
Sciencerocks

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Rapid and continuous 3-D printing with light
January 22, 2019 by Thamarasee Jeewandara, Phys.org feature
 

Three-dimensional (3-D) printing, also known as additive manufacturing (AM), can transform a material layer by layer to build an object of interest. 3-D printing is not a new concept, since stereolithography printers have existed since the 1980s. The widespread availability and cost-effectiveness of the technology has allowed a variety of modern applications in biomedical engineering.

The contemporary process of layer-wise additive manufacture is nevertheless slow and impacts the rate of object fabrication for objects with ridged surfaces. Continuous stereolithographic printing can overcome the limits by increasing print speeds to generate objects with smooth surfaces. Now writing in Science Advances, Martin P. de Beer, Harry L. van der Laan and co-workers demonstrate a new method for rapid and continuous stereolithographic additive manufacture (SLA) in a single shot by interfacing the raw material with two wavelengths of light.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...apid-d.html#jCp


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#388
karthikaqpt

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“NERA” - World's First Fully 3d Printed e-Motorcycle:

 

 

The Researchers from "NOWLAB" developed the world’s first fully 3D printed e-Motorcycle which is functional. The 3D printed e-bike is named as NERA. It has the groundBreaking features like, airless tires, embedded electronics, and forkless steering. Almost all the parts of NERA except the electrical components are created using 3D Printing.

 

 

nera-3d-printed-e-bike-bigrep.png

 

 

 


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#389
caltrek

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The Space Station's New 3-D Printer Recycles Old Plastic Into Custom Tools

 

http://blogs.discove...r-3-d-printing/

 

Introduciton:

(Discover) Last week, Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus spacecraft departed the International Space Station, having delivered a batch of new experiments and cargo. Among them was the Refabricator, a new machine that will not only make objects on demand things for the astronauts, it will recycle them too.

 

While 3-D printers are becoming commonplace, nowhere are their benefits more obvious than in the confines of space.

Refab_ISF_Image1-e1549919237177-749x1024

The Refabricator can recycle plastic and 3-D print it, all within a box the size of a mini-refrigerator.

(Credit: Allison Porter, Tethers Unlimited, Inc.)


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#390
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Light provides control for 3-D printing with multiple materials

March 12, 2019 by Stephanie Blaszczyk, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

3-D printing has revolutionized the fields of healthcare, biomedical engineering, manufacturing and art design.

 

Successful applications have come despite the fact that most 3-D printing techniques can only produce parts made of one material at a time. More complex applications could be developed if 3-D printers could use different materials and create multi-material parts.

New research uses different wavelengths of light to achieve this complexity. Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison developed a novel 3-D printer that uses patterns of visible and ultraviolet light to dictate which of two monomers are polymerized to form a solid material. Different patterns of light provide the spatial control necessary to yield multi-material parts. The work was published Feb. 15 in the journal Nature Communications.

 

 



Read more at: https://phys.org/new...erials.html#jCp

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#391
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4-D printing multi-metal products with a desktop electrochemical 3-D printer

by Thamarasee Jeewandara , Tech Xplore

 

Four-dimensional (4-D) printing can create complex 3-D geometries that react to environmental stimuli, opening new design opportunities in materials science. A vast majority of 4-D printing approaches use polymer materials, which limit the operational temperature during the process of engineering. In a recent study, Xiaolong Chen and co-workers at the Dyson School of Design and Engineering, Department of Earth Science and Engineering and Department of Materials at the Imperial College of London, U.K., developed a new multi-metal electrochemical 3-D printer. The device was able to construct bimetallic geometries by selectively depositing different metals with temperature-responsive behavior programmed into the printed structure. In the study, they demonstrated a meniscus confined electrochemical 3-D printing approach using a multi-print head design and nickel and copper materials as examples, the ability can be transferred to other deposition solutions. The results are now published in Scientific Reports.

 

https://techxplore.c...rochemical.html


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#392
wjfox

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3D-printed transparent skull provides a window to the brain

 

April 02, 2019

 

Researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed a unique 3D-printed transparent skull implant for mice that provides an opportunity to watch activity of the entire brain surface in real time. The device allows fundamental brain research that could provide new insight for human brain conditions such as concussions, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

 

The research is published in Nature Communications. Researchers also plan to commercialize the device, which they call See-Shell.

 

“What we are trying to do is to see if we can visualize and interact with large parts of the mouse brain surface, called the cortex, over long periods of time. This will give us new information about how the human brain works,” said Suhasa Kodandaramaiah, Ph.D., a co-author of the study and University of Minnesota Benjamin Mayhugh Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the College of Science and Engineering. “This technology allows us to see most of the cortex in action with unprecedented control and precision while stimulating certain parts of the brain.”

 

In the past, most scientists have looked at small regions of the brain and tried to understand it in detail. However, researchers are now finding that what happens in one part of the brain likely affects other parts of the brain at the same time.

 

Read more: https://twin-cities....es-window-brain

 

 

DlOioy2.jpg


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#393
karthikaqpt

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First ever 3D heart using patient’s own cells:

 

Tel Aviv University researchers have "printed" the world's first 3D vascularised engineered heart using a patient's own cells and biological materials.

 

"This is the first time anyone anywhere has successfully engineered and printed an entire heart replete with cells, blood vessels, ventricles and chambers," says Prof. Tal Dvir of TAU.

 

 

Related:

 

3d Printing Inventions in Medical field






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