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3D Printing News and Discussions


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#381
Sciencerocks

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Neutrogena tech produces user-specific 3D-printed facial masks

When it comes to hydrating facial skin, along with delivering nutrients to it, ready-made "sheet masks" have become quite popular. Neutrogena is now taking the concept further – its MaskiD system fabricates 3D-printed masks that are customized to the shape and needs of each client's face.

 

https://newatlas.com...eet-mask/57885/



#382
caltrek

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3D-printed guns may be more dangerous to their users than targets

 

https://theconversat...-targets-103724

 

Introducion:

(The Conversation) Despite fears that guns made with 3D printers will let criminals and terrorists easily make untraceable, undetectable plastic weapons at home, my own experience with 3D manufacturing quality control suggests that, at least for now, 3D-printed firearms may pose as much, or maybe even more, of a threat to the people who try to make and use them.

 

One firearms expert suggested that even the best 3D-printed guns might only fire “five shots [before] blowing up in your hand.” A weapon with a design or printing defect might blow up or come apart in its user’s hand before firing even a single bullet.

 

As someone who uses 3D printing in his work and researches quality assurance technologies, I’ve had the opportunity to see numerous printing defects and analyze what causes them. The problem is not with the concept of 3D printing, but with the exact process followed to create a specific item. Consumer 3D printers don’t always create high-quality items, and regular people aren’t likely to engage in rigorous quality assurance testing before using a 3D-printed firearm.

 

Problems are common at home

 

Many consumer 3D printers experience a variety of glitches, causing defects in the items they make. At times, an object detaches from the platform it’s on while being made, ending up lopsided, broken or otherwise damaged. Flaws can be much harder to detect when the flow of filament – the melted plastic material the item is being made from – is too hot or cold or too fast or slow, or stops when it shouldn’t. Even with all of the settings right, sometimes 3D-printed objects still have defects.

file-20190104-32121-bfd1x4.jpg?ixlib=rb-

A company called Defense Distributed developed a 3D-printed gun called the Liberator, which many fear could pass through security checkpoints undetected. 

AP Photo/Eric Gay


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#383
Sciencerocks

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3-D printing 100 times faster with light

by University of Michigan

 

Rather than building up plastic filaments layer by layer, a new approach to 3-D printing lifts complex shapes from a vat of liquid at up to 100 times faster than conventional 3-D printing processes, University of Michigan researchers have shown.

3-D printing could change the game for relatively small manufacturing jobs, producing fewer than 10,000 identical items, because it would mean that the objects could be made without the need for a mold costing upwards of $10,000. But the most familiar form of 3-D printing, which is sort of like building 3-D objects with a series of 1D lines, hasn't been able to fill that gap on typical production timescales of a week or two.

"Using conventional approaches, that's not really attainable unless you have hundreds of machines," said Timothy Scott, U-M associate professor of chemical engineering who co-led the development of the new 3-D printing approach with Mark Burns, the T.C. Chang Professor of Engineering at U-M.

 

https://techxplore.c...1-d-faster.html


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#384
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Gizmag
‏ @gizmag
54m54 minutes ago

3D-printed internet-connected bike gets 140-grand pricetag - https://gizm.ag/2DewuS0






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