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Increasing Resilience in Communities

resilience resilient community communities prepper

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#1
nomad

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I've been poking around places like http://www.resilience.org/ and http://www.waldenlabs.com/ . There is a lot that can be done to decentralize things, make communities less grid reliant, localize production and consumption, and make people more self-reliant. How much of it will become popular though? There are plenty of places where zoning laws actively over-regulate micro-agriculture and put up onerous regulations that stand in the way of green, sustainable improvements to individual properties that would benefit many in a community. I'd love to see a future full of lawns transformed into permaculture gardens, communities that are truly bike/pedestrian friendly, skillshares, maker spaces, decentralized power through solar power, decentralized water through wells and rainwater harvesting, decentralized sewage via tanks, relegalization of wood stoves, micro-agriculture, farmer's markets, time banks, tool banks, and organic seed banks.

Out of all of this and related concepts, which do you think will be the more popular widespread resilient features in the communities of the future?


Cats.


#2
nomad

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I guess that falls under Maker Spaces, but absolutely yes Eacao. 3d Printing. All those little plastic pieces of whatever that get shipped over from China might not be too bad now, but Peak Oil is making shipping costs and the cost of plastic goods in the future likely to be more expensive.

 

Spaces with plots to rent out to garden are something else I was wondering would become popular. Gardening does seem to have a low return, but a lot of folks go to the gym to work out with no return beyond the exercise and gardening is similar but with the food benefit. Not for everybody, but if you consider the price of organic produce instead of gmo produce, that certainly raises the benefit. Personally, I thought fruit trees would be the best bargain for effort to production as they require little maintenance when compared to most gardening adventures.


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Cats.


#3
Zeitgeist123

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im all for it but economists know that decentralization does majorly impact GDP growth. sure, people in this part of town are wealthy, but their wealth arent liquid enough to circulate the economy. kinda like the farmers owning acres of land, herd of cows, tractors, etc etc. if you total all the farmer's wealth you will be surprised that they are relatively wealthy, however the unliquidity of their wealth means that they dont have enough cash to buy extensive luxuries as urban dwellers are. but i think this is a good idea, if we dont rely on the economy too much. otherwise, i dont see the incentive for us to be able to send people to the moon or anyone motivated for asteroid mining since there is not enough liquid cash to invest on those projects. but maybe in the future AI cans solve this. 


“Philosophy is a pretty toy if one indulges in it with moderation at the right time of life. But if one pursues it further than one should, it is absolute ruin." - Callicles to Socrates


#4
Unity

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I think in the future as part of programs like basic income, etc the government will provide subsidies for things like hydroponics in order to make countries more sustainable in terms of food.  This will especially be cost effective as third world population skyrockets around 2050 increasing food prices substantially especially with heavy droughts in the west that is one of the breadbaskets of the United States at least.To me, these programs will be like solar panels.  They will be unpopular at first because of cost among conservatives, but need will push us to do it anyway and to be honest everyone likes a deal so if it ends up saving them money they will go along with it.  However, this may "disrupt" agriculture and that could be dangerous for the economy/stability







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: resilience, resilient, community, communities, prepper

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