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Graphene

graphene

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#1
wizzard

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What are your thoughts about this new material called "Graphene"? It is supposed to be the strongest material on the planet. It's made up of several different materials and has a wide range of uses.

http://news.bbc.co.u...ine/9491789.stm

#2
Kynareth

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Well, it's one of those 'materials of the future', it may have wide range of use. For example it was already put on battery electrodes for shorten charging time 12 times or it can be used for flexible touchscreens. And more applications will be found.

#3
Caiman

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Graphene is one of those really exciting developments that appears to have huge potential and I really hope it can deliver on everything that seems to be promised by its development and implementation into technology. I think it's really important for technologies which don't rely on our current industrial structure to be developed and pushed into manufacture using methods which will help us get through and conquer peak oil, which is really going to be a massive test of our global economy this century. This stuff has some amazing applications in underpinning the next revolution in our technological development.

~Jon


#4
mic of orion

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What are your thoughts about this new material called "Graphene"? It is supposed to be the strongest material on the planet. It's made up of several different materials and has a wide range of uses.

http://news.bbc.co.u...ine/9491789.stm


I have few thoughts, but let me leave you with single one,

carbon nano tubes.
It's dangerous to be right, when your government is wrong.
They that can give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.

#5
Caiman

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Here's some recent news on bringing graphene closer to becoming a commercially viable material;

http://www.purdue.ed...enGraphene.html

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Researchers have developed a method for creating single-crystal arrays of a material called graphene, an advance that opens up the possibility of a replacement for silicon in high-performance computers and electronics.

Graphene is a one-atom-thick layer of carbon that conducts electricity with little resistance or heat generation. The arrays could make possible a new class of high-speed transistors and integrated circuits that consume less energy than conventional silicon electronics.

The new findings represent an advance toward perfecting a method for manufacturing large quantities of single crystals of the material, similar to the production of silicon wafers.

The method of production described later in the article is really quite interesting, recommend you head over and check the full thing out.

~Jon


#6
Nom du Clavier

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Here's some recent news on bringing graphene closer to becoming a commercially viable material;

http://www.purdue.ed...enGraphene.html

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Researchers have developed a method for creating single-crystal arrays of a material called graphene, an advance that opens up the possibility of a replacement for silicon in high-performance computers and electronics.

Graphene is a one-atom-thick layer of carbon that conducts electricity with little resistance or heat generation. The arrays could make possible a new class of high-speed transistors and integrated circuits that consume less energy than conventional silicon electronics.

The new findings represent an advance toward perfecting a method for manufacturing large quantities of single crystals of the material, similar to the production of silicon wafers.

The method of production described later in the article is really quite interesting, recommend you head over and check the full thing out.


Graphene needs to be doped with another material, without this contamination it doesn't have a band gap and isn't really useful in transistors as you can't switch them off... or so Intel said recently. Nevertheless, it's a material with amazing potential in a wide range of applications, including transistors at some point, I'm sure.
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#7
OrbitalResonance

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http://www.washingto...FL8SH_blog.html IBM makes first graphene integrated circuit http://www.scienceda...10617110710.htm

We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers. - Carl Sagan


#8
Caiman

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From the above article^

However, the circuit can handle frequencies up to 10 GHz

Yay we'll finally start to see the GHz factor growing again :D

~Jon


#9
Nom du Clavier

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Graphene needs to be doped with another material, without this contamination it doesn't have a band gap and isn't really useful in transistors as you can't switch them off... or so Intel said recently. Nevertheless, it's a material with amazing potential in a wide range of applications, including transistors at some point, I'm sure.


Scratch that... I hate replying to myself, but scientists have found a way to introduce a band gap without having to introduce impurities by doping graphene. To 'quote' Randall Munroe:

Posted Image
This amount of awesome cannot be from concentrate.

#10
jjf3

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I always hear about how Graphene is supposed to be the new material like plastic in the future. Is there any companies or startups working on graphene that one can watch and/or maybe invest in later in the future???
"Did you really expect some utopian fantasy to rise from the ashes?" Thomas Zarek-- Battlestar Galactica.

#11
Nom du Clavier

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The thing to do is invest is companies making kitchen sinks. Everybody always wants, "everything *and* the kitchen sink". That's where the real money is... ;) But seriously, the thing about startups is that most draw their seed money from venture capital, which unless you're a venture capitalist or invest with one, means you have no way of investing in companies like this until after they've popped (had an IPO) and went public.
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#12
jjf3

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The thing to do is invest is companies making kitchen sinks. Everybody always wants, "everything *and* the kitchen sink". That's where the real money is... ;) But seriously, the thing about startups is that most draw their seed money from venture capital, which unless you're a venture capitalist or invest with one, means you have no way of investing in companies like this until after they've popped (had an IPO) and went public.


That's why I was asking for startups to keep an eye on them, I love the startup world and would want to keep an eye on this graphene technology because right now it seems to be in experimental and prototype phase, and is nobody mass producing this yet? That's what I am wondering.
"Did you really expect some utopian fantasy to rise from the ashes?" Thomas Zarek-- Battlestar Galactica.

#13
Craven

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All I know is, that one of polish universities has patented method of making it relatively cheap and quick, and that was few months ago. I dunno if they are going to make it, or sell patent. Not much word about it.
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#14
Rook

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I haven't seen this posted in thsi thread, so here's an article I saw from future timeline's twitter.

http://news.bbc.co.u...ine/9491789.stm

IBM has created a 150 gigahertz (GHz) transistor - the quickest comparable silicon device runs at about 40 GHz.


150 GHz transistor?!? I want to know how many of these transistors they can fit on a CPU core and how much it costs to make a processor that powerful (i.e., is this something consumers can see in their devices in 5-10 years from now).

The article also points out problems with graphene and why many believe it's not going to replace silicon anytime soon. As exciting as all the possibilities are (replace plastic, improve solar panels, faster/smaller processors, etc.), part of me worries that it becomes another "bubble" event. And people are getting too excited, and investing too quickly before all the facts are available.

#15
Caiman

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It's certainly one of those developments which is starting to sound 'too good to be true' but definitely worth pursuing until we are otherwise satisfied it is not viable (which will hopefully not be the case) – also, love the graph @ nom

~Jon


#16
Craven

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Well let's look at it this way - if graphene is 1,000 times better than silicon and 100,000 more expensive it kinda seems realistic
"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

"Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Weep, and you weep alone."

#17
Caiman

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Here’s a new article on the BBC regarding using graphene to boost internet speeds;

http://www.bbc.co.uk...nology-14730689

Graphene, the strongest material on Earth, could help boost broadband internet speed, say researchers.
A UK team had devised a way to capture and convert more light into power than was previously possible.
Scientists from the Universities of Manchester and Cambridge upped the sensitivity by combining graphene with tiny metallic structures.
Their discovery paves the way for more efficient optical components and connections.
The researchers describe their findings in the journal Nature Communications


This stuff could really have amazing applications across such a broad spectrum of technologies, eh.

~Jon


#18
Caiman

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http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-15152609

Not a huge amount of money in the grand scheme of things, especially considering cuts from other areas of research and development, but still good to see some specific funding for this.

The UK government has pledged £50m towards developing spin-off technologies from the super-strong material graphene.
The announcement comes exactly a year after two Manchester-based scientists were awarded the Nobel-prize for its discovery.
The money is hoped to give researchers more bench space to explore the material's commercial potential.
Funds will be available in the next few months, said the UK science minister.
Graphene, the "miracle material" of the 21st Century, is so far the strongest material known to science, and better at conducting electricity than copper.
It could have a large number of potential application; scientists say it could find uses from transparent touch screens to solar cells, from aircraft wings to optical communication systems, like broadband.
The Chancellor, George Osborne, in his speech at the Conservative Party conference said: "…We will fund a national research programme that will take this Nobel Prize-winning discovery from the British laboratory to the British factory floor.
"We've got to get Britain making things again.
"Countries like Singapore, Korea, America are luring [researchers] with lucrative offers to move their research overseas," he added.
The funds for graphene R&D are in addition to £145 million "earmarked" for the establishment of more UK-based supercomputers, along with funding to support more computer-scientists and facilities to house them, the University and Science Minister David Willetts told BBC News.
He said: "I'm very happy; even in tough times we are investing in science".
In response to the announcement, Professor Sir Peter Knight, President of the Institute of Physics, said: "We're delighted that the Government recognises the role science can play in creating a vibrant, diverse economy for the future of the UK - investment in science delivers great returns economically and intellectually".
"We applauded the Government's decision to 'invest intelligently'," said the director of the Campaign for Science and Engineering (Case) Imran Khan in a statement.
However, he cautions: "These new investments are coming in the wake of enormous cuts to the nation's science and engineering base.
"Last month [Case] released an analysis showing that £1.7bn will have been cut from research and development funds by 2014-15."
Without a long-term strategy to put science and engineering at the heart of the UK's economic recovery, said Mr Khan, home-growth discoveries like groundbreaking research into graphene could be a thing of the past.


~Jon


#19
wjfox

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Graphene's 'Big Mac' Creates Next Generation of Chips

http://www.scienceda...11009140214.htm


Posted Image

Illustration of graphene sheet. (Credit: © nobeastsofierce / Fotolia)

#20
Prolite

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When does everyone think graphene will be become commercially viable? 5 years? 10 years? And can a space elevator be built from it?
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