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Graphene

graphene

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#41
SG-1

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Does anyone have any idea when the market will see graphene products? When will this wonder-matrerial make its way into improving electronics? My un-educated guess would be some time around 2025-2030. I can't find hardly anything online about the cost of creating graphene and when it will be cheap to make substantial amounts of it.

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#42
RCM88x

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@SG - 1: I would guess you will start seeing it around 2020, but not till 2025 in computer chips. But who knows once a economically friendly way to produce it surfaces someone might take a chance and you could see it even earlier than 2020, wouldn't surprise me.

#43
wjfox

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Graphene: Potential for Modelling Cell Membrane Systems

ScienceDaily (Mar. 21, 2012) — At Toyohashi University of Technology the intriguing properties of graphene -- a single atomic-layer of carbon -- such as high electron mobility and fluorescence quenching are being exploited for biosensing and analysis of nucleotides, peptides, and proteins.

Graphene could also play an important role in the modelling of cell membranes. For example, the lipid bilayer is the fundamental structure of cell membranes, and the structure and dynamic of bilayer membranes govern the transport of materials and information in and out of cells.

http://www.scienceda...20321152558.htm


Posted Image
Fig.1. (A) Scanning electron microscope image
of GO flakes dropped onto a SiO2/Si substrate.
(B) Atomic force microscope topography and
© structural model of DOPC bilayer membranes
on GO/SiO2/Si.
(Credit: Copyright : Toyohashi University of Technology)


#44
wjfox

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Move over graphene, silicene is the new star material

29 April 2012
Magazine issue 2862. Subscribe and save

AFTER only a few years basking in the limelight, wonder material graphene has a competitor in the shape of silicene. For the first time, silicon has been turned into a sheet just one atom thick. Silicene is thought to have similar electronic properties to graphene but ought to be more compatible with silicon-based electronic devices.

Patrick Vogt of Berlin's Technical University in Germany, and colleagues at Aix-Marseille University in France created silicene by condensing silicon vapour onto a silver plate to form a single layer of atoms. They then measured the optical, chemical and electronic properties of the layer, showing it closely matched those predicted by theory (Physical Review Letters, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.155501).

Silicene may turn out to be a better bet than graphene for smaller and cheaper electronic devices because it can be integrated more easily into silicon chip production lines.

http://www.newscient...r-material.html


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#45
Guyverman1990

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Diamond is basically a natural version of Graphene. So it will essentially be the same as Diamond Armor if I'm not mistaken?

#46
Craven

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Diamond is a 3D tetrahedron, while graphene is 2D hexagonal mesh. If anything graphene is more like graphite.
"I walk alone and do no evil, having only a few wishes, just like an elephant in the forest."

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#47
Caiman

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Bump.

http://www.geekosyst...e-desalination/

According to researchers at MIT, graphene could also increase the efficicency of desalination by two or three orders of magnitude. Seriously, what can’t this stuff do?

Desalination might sound boring, but it’s super important. Around 97% of the planet’s water is saltwater and therefore unpotable, and while you can remove the salt from the water, the current methods of doing so are laborious and expensive. Graphene stands to change all that by essentially serving as the world’s most awesomely efficient filter. If you can increase the efficiency of desalination by two or three orders of magnitude (that is to say, make it 100 to 1,000 times more efficient) desalination suddenly becomes way more attractive as a way to obtain drinking water.


~Jon


#48
Caiman

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Big news about Graphene really. One of the potential obstacles was how easy to damage it could be... but now a method to make it repair itself has been discovered.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-18782151

Graphene's outstanding mechanical strength and electronic properties make it a promising material for a wide range of future applications.

But its almost ethereal thinness makes it easily damaged when working with it.

The study, published in Nano Letters, suggests it can be repaired by simply exposing it to loose carbon atoms.

It was carried out by researchers at the University of Manchester - including Konstantin Novoselov, who shared a Nobel prize as graphene's co-discoverer - and at the SuperStem Laboratory of the Science and Technology Facilities Council.

The team was initially interested in the effects of adding metal contacts to strips of graphene, the only way to exploit its phenomenal electronic properties.

The process routinely creates holes in the atom-thick sheets, so the researchers were trying to understand how those holes form, firing electron beams through graphene sheets and then studying the results with an electron microscope.

But to their surprise, they found that when carbon atoms were also near the samples, the atoms snapped into place, repairing the two-dimensional sheet.

"It just happened that we noticed it," said co-author of the study Quentin Ramasse of the SuperStem laboratory.

"We repeated it a few times and then tried to understand how that came about," he told BBC News.

The team found that when metal atoms were around, they too would snap into the edges of the holes, and when carbon was around as part of molecules called hydrocarbons, the carbon atoms from them could form irregular shapes in the sheets. Read the rest: http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-18782151


~Jon


#49
wjfox

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#50
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Research Hints at Graphene’s Photovoltaic Potential

March 2, 2013

Researchers have demonstrated that graphene is highly efficient at generating electrons upon absorbing light, which suggests that the material could be used to make light sensors and perhaps even more efficient solar cells.

http://www.zeitnews....ltaic-potential

 



#51
Italian Ufo

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That would be great.



#52
CLB

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I'm sorry, is there anything that graphene CAN'T do?!?

If something I say sounds like trolling/being stupid/offensive, please forgive me. I'm bad with people.


#53
SG-1

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Make you a sandwich, until then.  I don't care what this special version of graphite can do.


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#54
Italian Ufo

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LOL

 

Make you a sandwich, until then.  I don't care what this special version of graphite can do.


#55
Cody930

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Great news! Solar definitely needs this.

 

Make you a sandwich, until then.  I don't care what this special version of graphite can do.

 

This made my day. xP


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#56
Italian Ufo

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sg1 comes out with some funny stuff

#57
Raklian

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Maybe graphite may be one of the basic components that make up the ultimate molecular replicator that will make SG-1's sandwich, eh?

 

If that's a slight possibility, then SG-1 should care about this. :)


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#58
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Pentagon weapons-maker finds method for cheap, clean water

A defense contractor better known for building jet fighters and lethal missiles says it has found a way to slash the amount of energy needed to remove salt from seawater, potentially making it vastly cheaper to produce clean water at a time when scarcity has become a global security issue.

The process, officials and engineers at Lockheed Martin Corp say, would enable filter manufacturers to produce thin carbon membranes with regular holes about a nanometer in size that are large enough to allow water to pass through but small enough to block the molecules of salt in seawater. A nanometer is a billionth of a meter.

Because the sheets of pure carbon known as graphene are so thin - just one atom in thickness - it takes much less energy to push the seawater through the filter with the force required to separate the salt from the water, they said.

The development could spare underdeveloped countries from having to build exotic, expensive pumping stations needed in plants that use a desalination process called reverse osmosis.

"It's 500 times thinner than the best filter on the market today and a thousand times stronger," said John Stetson, the engineer who has been working on the idea. "The energy that's required and the pressure that's required to filter salt is approximately 100 times less."

Read more: http://www.reuters.c...E92C05720130313



#59
wjfox

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Magnetic graphene! :)

 

http://phys.org/news...lectronics.html

 

This is a pretty epic breakthrough.



#60
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Graphene camera sensors said to be 1,000 times more sensitive to light

By Stefan Constantinescu posted May 31st, 2013 at 8:31 AM

While we're still scratching around with Ultrapixels and OIS, scientists in Singapore claim they're working on something that could change the entire field of photography. Researchers at the Nanyang Technological University have developed an image sensor made out of graphene that's 1,000 times better at capturing light than traditional CMOS or CCD sensors, all while using 10x less energy.

http://www.engadget....mpaign=Engadget







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