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Tourism in Chernobyl

Chernobyl Radiation Tourism Russian History

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11 replies to this topic

#1
caltrek

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Now I've heard everything:

 

http://www.spiegel.d...-a-1089210.html

 

 

 

On April 26, 1986, Chernobyl's reactor Nr. 4 exploded, quickly becoming the most devastating nuclear accident in history. Many of the images stemming from that day have become iconic: the destroyed reactor, little more than a smoking hole after the blast; the convoys that evacuated more than 200,000 people from the danger zone; the wolves, European bison and wild horses that roam freely through the abandoned villages 30 years after the disaster; older residents who refused to leave, living off of half-legal, irradiated potatoes, even though the entire area within a 30 kilometer (19 mile) radius of the nuclear reactor is officially off-limits.

 

But there is another Chernobyl that doesn't make it into the headlines quite as often. This Chernobyl is a favored "dark tourism" destination, celebrated on websites such as Atlas Obscura. It is a brand of tourism that attracts people with nightmare destinations rather than dreamy beaches. Hiroshima, Verdun, Gettysburg, Pompeii -- places of horror, pain and sadness....

 

Our next stop is the exploded reactor, huge, threatening and sheathed in concrete, the so-called sarcophagus. The radiation dosage here is over 3 micro-sieverts per hour, about 20 times the normal contamination one is exposed to in a big city. On the other hand, though, it is much less than the radiation dosage one receives during a trans-Atlantic flight -- at least according to a brochure passed out in the bus.

image-985512-breitwandaufmacher-lxdg-985

 

Photo from Der Spiegel article


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#2
BasilBerylium

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Funny how the third area affected directly by radiation is probably one of the most popular destinations in Russia


This website has a magic that makes people draw back here like moths to light.


#3
Smeargle

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one of the most popular destinations in Russia


I don't know what decade you're living in, but...

ARADIA: i think i mostly want to see what happens when this whole place breaks apart


#4
TheComrade

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This place is not as dangerous as you could think. Especially if you're staying for just a few hours and not going to live there.



#5
caltrek

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^^Yes, I suppose short visits might be relatively safe.  Still, I would not want to take the risk.  

 

It is interesting to hear and read of reports of wildlife coming back in the absence of humans.  Apparently they can survive in that environment, although presumably with higher rates of cancer and birth defects.

 

Have you ever been there?


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#6
TheComrade

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Have you ever been there?

 

No, never. And i don't think i'll visit Ukraine anytime soon (for obvious reasons). The only place in Ukraine i ever visited was Crimea, few years ago when everything was calm and quiet. Perhaps i'll do it again when they finish this bridge.



#7
Kynareth

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My acquaintance was in Chernobyl as a tourist and it wasn't a short trip but rather a long one. He was really contented after coming back. He's alive and well.



#8
caltrek

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@ Phoenix Riu and Kynareth,

 

Thank you both for your interesting comments!

 

Edit:  Also, thank you Basil Berlyium and Smeargle for your contributions.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#9
caltrek

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Massive Chernobyl shelter safely put over exploded reactor

 

http://www.msn.com/e...ID=ansmsnnews11

 

Extract

 

CHERNOBYL, Ukraine — Workers completed a massive shelter over the Chernobyl nuclear plant's exploded reactor on Tuesday, one of the most ambitious engineering projects in the world that one expert said had closed "a nuclear wound."

 

The half cylinder-shaped shelter was locked in place over the plant's reactor No. 4 after being moved in on hydraulic jacks for two weeks. It marks a significant step toward containing the consequences of the world's worst nuclear accident, which occurred 30 years ago in what is now Ukraine.

 

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko described the new shelter as "the biggest moving construction that humanity has ever created."

 

Workers will now begin dismantling unstable parts of the original cover, the so-called sarcophagus, which was built over the reactor shortly after the disaster to contain radiation.

 

…The new shelter is 275 meters (843 feet) wide and 108 meters (354 feet) tall and cost about 1.5 billion euros, according to the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. More than 40 governments have contributed to funding its construction, which involved 10,000 workers.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#10
lain

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yeah, I've read about this a couple of years ago and I was planning to visit it - I love ghost town tourism and urban exploration-, but then my hypochondria\DOC worsened and an apocalyptic post nuclear disaster city with still a worrisome level of radioactive isotopes is not exactly the best place for someone with my symptoms



#11
Infinite

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Massive Chernobyl shelter safely put over exploded reactor

 

 

Timelapse gif

 

http://i.imgur.com/ORnpTI7.gifv


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#12
TheComrade

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Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko described the new shelter as "the biggest moving construction that humanity has ever created."

 

He also presented this huge sarcophagus as "symbol of new Ukraine"... surprisingly tactless man.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Chernobyl, Radiation, Tourism, Russian History

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