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Utopia vs Eutopia vs Dystopia: Which Is Our Future?

utopia eutopia dystopia future Singularity Soft Singularity

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Poll: The Future Is A... (19 member(s) have cast votes)

Which one of these three sounds right?

  1. Utopia [Everything's perfect, and everyone's happy] (1 votes [5.26%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.26%

  2. Eutopia [Everything's okay, but there are still problems] (15 votes [78.95%])

    Percentage of vote: 78.95%

  3. Dystopia [Everything's gone to shit, and there is no hope] (3 votes [15.79%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.79%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#1
Yuli Ban

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Will the Future Be Hellish, Heavenly, or Simply Better Than Today?

What will the future look like? Imagine it for a second.
 
Maybe you see a gleaming city cleaner than anything has a right to be. Personal flying machines zip overhead, like insects pollinating megatowers in a skyline designed to make Dubai blush. Technology for the win. We humans have figured it all out.
 
Or maybe it’s grimy.
The Disney future was more popular before weapons of mass destruction, financial panic, and the internet made us “wise” and cynical about the direction of humanity. The new view is all about inequality, squalor, and robots run amok—99% of us turned away at Disney’s gates. (Pick your book, movie, or headline.)
These are obviously extreme (and cliché) scenarios, and yet they’re persistent in pop culture. It’s the utopians against the dystopians; the Pollyanas versus the Cassandras.
So, which worldview wins the future?
According to Kevin Kelly, senior maverick at Wired and fabulous author of the future, none of the above. Along with the release of his new book The Inevitable, Kelly's been out on the interview circuit talking about how he looks ahead into the future and what he thinks about the tension between pessimism and optimism.
“Despite the headlines and general pessimistic view, the world is getting better and has been getting better for hundreds if not thousands of years," Kelly recently told the Observer. "Technology gives people more choices.”
Kelly is an optimist, but he isn't a supporter of the Disney vision. The future doesn’t replace the present, he says, it builds on it, layer by layer. To him, the most plausible science fiction worlds are the "worn" ones.
Today, for example, there are more old technologies than new—more of wood, stone, and steel than silicon. Similarly, the world of tomorrow will be gritty and sparkling, high tech and low tech, humans living in a dizzying range of technological niches. Technology will solve old problems and create new ones, but the net result will be favorable.
You might call this view the skeptical optimist.

 
My commentary: "Better than today" is the right answer.

To any newcomers, here's the rule of thumb:
 

  • Utopia: Things are perfect, or at least they're perfect for you. This would resemble all our dreams, bending reality backwards to bring peace and prosperity to all.
  • Eutopia: Things range from "damn-near perfect" all the way to "better than dystopian". Right now, we're "better than dystopian" mixed with elements of a dystopia. A "damn-near perfect" world would be one where most countries resemble the best aspects of the USA, Scandinavia, and Japan.
  • Dystopia: Run away, buy cyanide pills, resist, do anything but try to live here. The whole world resembles North Korea mixed with Syria mixed with Eritrea mixed with the worst aspects of the USA and China, and that's just the welcoming mat to our problems.

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#2
Raklian

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Will the Future Be Hellish, Heavenly, or Simply Better Than Today?

 

My commentary: "Better than today" is the right answer. 

 

 

Agreed, but what happens after that... even more better (no idea what it means), skyrocket to heavenly or sharply regress into hellish?

 

I guess it all depends on how we collectively treat our future robot overlords while juggling with the delicate nature of climate change.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#3
Pisiu369

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1 voted Utopia because I don't know how far in the future you are telling use to vote about but, far enough we will become a utopian society.



#4
Awlq

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I have a hypothesis that if we were somehow able to measure how utopian or dystopian our world is, we have trended towards a utopian society over time. Though we may never become a fully utopian society because I think there will probably continue to be unsolved problems in our civilization. I do think the amount of unsolved problems our world faces will drastically decrease over time though. As of the year 2016, we have much less problems then 1000, 500, 100, or even 50 years ago. Here's a crudely drawn diagram of how I think the future will pan out for us in terms of utopia and dystopia: http://i.imgur.com/OKU5jnw.png



#5
Eterion

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Perfection is an illusion. Everyone has individual tastes regarding everything. Even if there were only 2 people alive, they would still disagree on something. I think we are moving towards Utopia, we might even one day consider our society as Utopia, but it will not be perfect. Therefore voted for Eutopia.



#6
illykitty

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Well, if by Utopia we mean a perfect society with no problems, then I say no. But I do feel that Utopia is still a useful concept, it is something to aim for. By doing the exercise of imagining a Utopia, we can come up with solutions and think outside of the box. Attaining perfection is in my opinion out of reach by definition. There's no such thing (apart from a subjective perspective, which someone else could disagree with).

 

A Eutopia is far more likely. But if I take an optimistic view (because I prefer that), and we go down a "good" road, I could see the future being considered a Utopia relatively speaking, say from out own eyes if we manage to live that long by whatever means. There could still be a lot of things to solve, improve and discover. This would by no means be perfect or without conflicts, just better than what we have now. Higher quality of life, solved problems and so on.



#7
nomad

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[Everything's gone to shit, but there is hope] for the next 300 years.


Cats.


#8
Infinite

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A good way to measure of we have achieved a utopia is to look at politics (assuming that a utopia means a world of abundance without disagreements). Politics is the product of human disagreement so as long as politics stick around, there will still be disagreements and therefore not a utopia.

I voted for eutopia because preferences have developed in different individuals due to their experiences and upbringing. Different preferences mean different ideas and different ways of solving problems, therefore meaning that disagreements will always hang around. I doubt a dystopia is probable because humans are hard wired to survive and therefore will do anything to aid their survival. In terms of natural disaster, if we can hold out until the next century it seems possible that we will be able to combat anything that spells danger.
.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: utopia, eutopia, dystopia, future, Singularity, Soft Singularity

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