Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Vantablack

vantablack nanotechnology carbon nanotubes black hole clarkes third law physics

  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#1
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,232 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

I wanna talk about this material, vantablack. 

New Vantablack material is so dark it can't be measured

It's basically the closest we can get to the color of a black hole. It's so black that less than a thousandth of a percent of light actually gets reflected. It's so black that your brain doesn't understand what it's looking at. It's so black that your computer can't properly display it. It's so black that it seems like magic.

 

It is magic! This is what I'm saying when I say "technology is magic", because if you showed this off to a person in medieval times, they'd be sure you're engaging in some form of sorcery. 

 

418984_34481_48147_dZ35HaheH.jpg

3237A02100000578-3493575-image-m-61_1458

vantablack.jpg

IL1c9O1.png?1

0b44d13254c6f704dba826c07c49cd6caa45b97c

850b6966-fec4-458f-b7d5-4d84ece04636.png

nanoblack-gravitation.jpg

It looks like a hole in reality!


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#2
leoking2000

leoking2000

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 87 posts
  • Locationgreece
it looks like someone photoshop the 
pictures


#3
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,232 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

In other words: it's so black, it doesn't look real.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#4
masterwigglestin

masterwigglestin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 69 posts

it looks like someone photoshop the 
pictures


Its does, that's just how black it is. I would like to have one of those phone cases made of this stuff.

"Society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."


#5
masterwigglestin

masterwigglestin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 69 posts
I feel like a lot of fun stuff could be done with this.

"Society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."


#6
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,232 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

Also a lot of practical stuff.

This substance has many potential applications, including preventing stray light from entering telescopes, and improving the performance of infrared cameras both on Earth and in space, Ben Jensen, Chief Technology Officer, Surrey NanoSystems, has explained: "For example, it reduces stray-light, improving the ability of sensitive telescopes to see the faintest stars... Its ultra-low reflectance improves the sensitivity of terrestrial, space and air-borne instrumentation."
Vantablack may also increase the absorption of heat in materials used in concentrated solar power technology, as well as military applications such as thermal camouflage. The emissivity of Vantablack and scalability support a wide range of applications.
The material is being used creatively by artist Anish Kapoor who said, "It's effectively like a paint... Imagine a space that's so dark that as you walk in you lose all sense of where you are, what you are, and especially all sense of time. The color was exclusively licensed to Kapoor's studio for artistic use, outraging some other artists who would be unable to use it. However, the manufacturer has explained that Vantablack is also subject to export controls by the UK, and due to its temperature and physical requirements is not practical for use in many types of art.


I have an idea: get a ball. A metal ball. Put it atop a magnetic surface. Coat it in vantablack paint.

Now you have what looks like a 2D hole in reality floating in midair.

 

Or maybe...

 

Get a cloak. Paint it vantablack. Now you look like the Grim Reaper.

 

Also...

 

Paint your car vantablack. Watch as it looks like some ghostly vehicle floats down the street.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#7
masterwigglestin

masterwigglestin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 69 posts
Imagine how hard it might be to catch a ball covered in this stuff. It would screw so much with your depth perception.

I want the cloak

"Society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."


#8
Dead Redshirt

Dead Redshirt

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 492 posts

That's really cool! In terms of practical uses, I wonder if it could be used as cloaking technology? I'm also assuming that this material is really expensive. This would also be suitable for the insides of telescope tubes. In telescope design, the blacker the inside of your tube is, the better as you want to be assured no light escapes.

 

Now someone needs to build a monolith, paint it with the stuff and send it off to the moon :D


My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. - Jack Layton - 1950 - 2011

#9
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,232 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

Imagine how hard it might be to catch a ball covered in this stuff. It would screw so much with your depth perception.

It's screwing with my depth perception just through these pictures. And remember, computers can't properly recognize vantablack, so the stuff's even blacker than the pictures I posted above show. And some of the pictures are of vantablack 1.0, not 2.0— 2.0 is blacker still.

 

 

That's really cool! In terms of practical uses, I wonder if it could be used as cloaking technology? I'm also assuming that this material is really expensive. This would also be suitable for the insides of telescope tubes. In telescope design, the blacker the inside of your tube is, the better as you want to be assured no light escapes.

 

Now someone needs to build a monolith, paint it with the stuff and send it off to the moon  :D

Apparently it is very expensive, to the point they don't want to disclose its price. But that's the nature of the beast since it's made out of carbon nanotubes.
 
This is making me think: would it be feasible to paint a large area of the ground somewhere in a high humidity area so that it releases so much heat that you can actually create rain clouds? Or does it absorb heat too well?
 

If the former, then you can add geoengineering to its list of applications.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#10
masterwigglestin

masterwigglestin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 69 posts
I imagine this stuff gets very hot from absorbing so much light. I wonder if coating buildings with it could keep them warm, or maybe a coating on a portable solar cooker or power generator of some sort could work.

The quote you posed said something about temperature requirements making it hard to export though, not sure what that means.

"Society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."


#11
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,232 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

1437701613_481096.jpeg

Vantablack_02.JPG

 

Here is some crinkled vantablack foil

Vantablack_01.JPG

1407318169208210.jpg?crop=0.981806968855

 

 

My brain is trying to make it 3D, but it's confused. It's like when a 2D object appears in our 3D reality. 

vantablack_clothing.jpg


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#12
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,232 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

tumblr_njfosoXa9c1seuch9o1_400.jpg

 

Damn, that's metal.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#13
Raklian

Raklian

    An Immortal In The Making

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,292 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

What's even cooler is that this material doesn't even reflect light from a laser pointer.

 

ygquhlklkax7tkpk9npz.GIF


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#14
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,232 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

Now someone needs to build a monolith, paint it with the stuff and send it off to the moon :D

HAL_2001_monolith.jpg


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#15
Dead Redshirt

Dead Redshirt

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 492 posts

 

That's really cool! In terms of practical uses, I wonder if it could be used as cloaking technology? I'm also assuming that this material is really expensive. This would also be suitable for the insides of telescope tubes. In telescope design, the blacker the inside of your tube is, the better as you want to be assured no light escapes.

 

Now someone needs to build a monolith, paint it with the stuff and send it off to the moon  :D

Apparently it is very expensive, to the point they don't want to disclose its price. But that's the nature of the beast since it's made out of carbon nanotubes.

 

 

Hmm, in that case, yeah, I can imagine.  But hopefully it will become affordable over time.  The idea of heating buildings with it as masterwigglestin points out is an interesting thought as well. Could it lead to a new source of heating, I wonder? With all our thoughts on oil,  wind farms and solar panels,  this might be the thing we've been waiting for.  I imagine that it could be more efficient to heat a home than any of them and might be able to recoup the cost by not having to pay any energy bills whatsoever.


My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. - Jack Layton - 1950 - 2011

#16
Erowind

Erowind

    Anarchist without an adjective

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,523 posts

I really want a Vantablack shirt now.



#17
superexistence

superexistence

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 273 posts

Wonder if there's an application for it in solar energy gathering.



#18
masterwigglestin

masterwigglestin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 69 posts

Wonder if there's an application for it in solar energy gathering.


Certainly. I think there may have been a mention of that in something that was posted already too.

"Society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in."


#19
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,232 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

Vantablack: It's blacker than black, but where is the world's darkest material being used?

When the world's darkest material made headlines in 2014, pundits predicted it would be used to turn military jets invisible, revolutionise our telescopes, and enable new trends in blacker-than-black haute couture.
 
Vantablack, invented by UK technology company Surrey NanoSystems, is a deep black material that absorbs 99.96 per cent of the light that hits it.
 
It can be used to coat 3D objects, turning them into visually flat, black 'holes' without any sense of shape.
 
But from much-hyped beginnings, is Vantablack actually out there in the real world three years after it was first revealed?
 
According to Surrey NanoSystems chief technical officer, Ben Jensen, the answer is yes.
 
He says the company is involved in a range of applications right now and more are on the horizon — though none involve painting stealth jets black.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#20
BasilBerylium

BasilBerylium

    Banned

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 734 posts

Can you imagine how trippy it'd be to shine a flashlight on your feet and see nothing but your feet omg

Okay, now combine the Anechoic Chamber with Vantablack

 

:dontknow:


This website has a magic that makes people draw back here like moths to light.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: vantablack, nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes, black hole, clarkes third law, physics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users