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Vertical/Indoor Farming News and Discussions

vertical farming news vertical farms ftw agriculture environment society food

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#21
Jakob

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And you know what? Each shipping container farm will have the yield of two freaking acres of conventional farmland. Once again, I fail to see how anyone can be a futurist and not a cornucopian.

It's very easy to be a futurist and a cornucopian. It's much harder justifying why we should have infinitely more mouths to take from that cornucopia.
Never fear. In the developed economies child birth rate drops to one child per woman with greater educational opportunities and economic opportunities. For the most part you will will see this trend continue into the future. It's Africa and India that we have to worry about

 

I am also sad that Africa and India will leave Western civilization in the dust and go on to conquer the stars, but with a proper pro-humanity and pro-advancement mindset, we can join them.

 

They won't conquer the stars. The cold fact is that their societies are ticking time bombs, likely to suffer sweeping collapse and break-up within 50 years. If not that, then certainly a rising trend of authoritarianism to whip them into shape.

Democracy only works with smaller populations. This is something China understands and India will soon learn themselves.

 

With a youthful and growing populace, they are sure to take the lead. Civilizations that stop growing advancing die. Japan is a dying nation. Koreans will not exist in a few centuries if demographic trends continue. Germany, too, will either die or be remade by the vast influx of Arab immigrants.

 

Do we want to go this route?



#22
Unity

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All nations, empires, etc die. Entropy is the great equalizer

#23
TranscendingGod

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All nations, empires, etc die. Entropy is the great equalizer

Entropy is the physical sense is not what makes nations and empires die. Unless these nations and empires died because their tools rusted or their buildings crumbled then entropy is hardly what brought them down. Unless of course you don't speak of entropy in the physical sense. 


The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#24
Alislaws

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- Jakob

 

What I really want to see is a vertical farm that can produce staple crops like wheat, not just fancy leafy greens. I've seen some suggestions floating around that we use dwarf versions of such crops, and the math is pretty promising--a 30-story 2 hectare building could produce as much as a 1000-hectare field. But why hasn't anyone done it yet?

​I'm curious about this too, every vertical farm I have seen reported on seems to produce leafy greens and not much else. 

 

Does anyone know of any farms which have produced any more interesting crops? Or ones that have tried and failed? I'm curious to see if they are refusing to engage with major crops to avoid stepping on the toes of powerful agricultural lobbies or if there is some underlying reason it won't work. 


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#25
caltrek

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^^^Just speculating, but I wonder if the relative size of root systems have anything to do with it.   A more extensive root system needing more soil, thus making vertical farming less attractive financially.

 

Like I say, I am just speculating as I have not read any literature that bears directly on the topic of root size in vertical farming. 

 

I tried to Google for an answer and did not come up with anything directly related to root system size.  However, I did find a lot regarding heavier use of hydroponics, which explains why some crops are more suitable than others.  I also found this:

 

https://www.cnbc.com...d-and-tech.html

 

(CNBC) The approach works best for salad greens and herbs, which have higher margins than other produce and can be grown in larger quantities than other vegetables that require more space and longer grow cycles.


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#26
Jakob

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- Jakob

 

What I really want to see is a vertical farm that can produce staple crops like wheat, not just fancy leafy greens. I've seen some suggestions floating around that we use dwarf versions of such crops, and the math is pretty promising--a 30-story 2 hectare building could produce as much as a 1000-hectare field. But why hasn't anyone done it yet?

​I'm curious about this too, every vertical farm I have seen reported on seems to produce leafy greens and not much else. 

 

Does anyone know of any farms which have produced any more interesting crops? Or ones that have tried and failed? I'm curious to see if they are refusing to engage with major crops to avoid stepping on the toes of powerful agricultural lobbies or if there is some underlying reason it won't work. 

 

NASA has grown dwarf wheat in space with hydroponics, so we could probably do the same on the ground:

 

 

Despommier suggests that, if dwarf versions of certain crops are used (e.g. dwarf wheat, which has been grown in space by NASA, is smaller in size but richer in nutrients), year-round crops, and "stacker" plant holders are accounted for, a 30-story building with a base of a building block (2 hectares (5 acres)) would yield a yearly crop analogous to that of 1,000 hectares (2,400 acres) of traditional farming.

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#27
Alislaws

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One thing i thought of was freshness. Maybe a big part of the appeal is the ability to grow your vegetables next door to the restaurant or point of sale. so for things like cereals where they're easily stored and often processed into flour etc. then one of the big benefits is irrelevant.

 

Still the tech to do all this was developed by people growing drugs, (vey high margins!) so in turn the guys growing fresh greens will be laying down the framework and bringing down the costs, till eventually we will see a wider variety of crops becoming competitive. 

 

I want to see what happens when someone builds a vertical farm vineyard, and they have control over every aspect of the winemaking process, soil, water light levels etc. surely that wine could be better than any grown naturally. 

 

long term investment though takes years to get grape vines to the right point. 


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#28
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Move Over, Skyscrapers. This “Plantscraper” Can Feed 5,000 a Year.

 

In Brief As populations grow and cities condense, availability of fresh produce becomes an increasingly dire issue. The concept of "plantscapers" could allow office buildings to feed thousands of people every year.

 

First actual skyscraper for vertical farming.


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#29
Jakob

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One thing i thought of was freshness. Maybe a big part of the appeal is the ability to grow your vegetables next door to the restaurant or point of sale. so for things like cereals where they're easily stored and often processed into flour etc. then one of the big benefits is irrelevant.

 

Still the tech to do all this was developed by people growing drugs, (vey high margins!) so in turn the guys growing fresh greens will be laying down the framework and bringing down the costs, till eventually we will see a wider variety of crops becoming competitive. 

 

I want to see what happens when someone builds a vertical farm vineyard, and they have control over every aspect of the winemaking process, soil, water light levels etc. surely that wine could be better than any grown naturally. 

 

long term investment though takes years to get grape vines to the right point. 

Well at the very least there's a proposal to grow rice in vertical farms.

 

Aeroponic Vertical Farm: High-Yield Terraced Rice Paddies for the Philippines

#30
Yuli Ban

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This indoor farm in New Jersey can grow 365 days a year and uses 95% less water than a typical farm

Bowery Farming in Kearny, New Jersey can grow 365 days a year.
Bowery CEO and founder Irving Fain: We grow indoors in big warehouse-scale farms that grow in a totally controlled environment, and we do stack LEDs vertically in that space. There's a number of issues with the traditional industrialized agricultural system that exist today, and Bowery's actually able to solve a number of those problems. We use 70% of the world's water supply in agriculture every single year, and just in the US alone, we put down about 700 million pounds of pesticides every year. And it's on the food that we're actually eating.
Here's how Bowery's technology is improving farming.
Fain: Our method of growing allows us to grow 365 days of the year, totally independent of weather and seasonality. On top of that though, we grow pesticide-free and agrochemical-free food. We grow more crop cycles per year than the field does, and we get more yield per every crop cycle. So not only do we grow more than 100 times plus more productively than the same square feet of farmland, but we also save over 95% of the water when we're growing.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#31
Yuli Ban

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I'm Kimbal Musk working for an America where everyone has access to real food. AMA!

Hey Reddit! I'm excited to be here answering your questions about entrepreneurship, following your passion, and of course all things food. My national non-profit organization, Big Green, is building outdoor Learning Garden classrooms in schoolyards across America. I'm giving away my fully loaded personal Tesla Model 3 to support this important initiative. It's the SIXTH ever made and YOU can enter to win here: http://omaze.com/tesla Ask me about my car, my restaurants, my urban farming accelerator, my favorite foods ... AMA! Questions about my bro aren't off limit but I may not answer them ;) Proof: https://twitter.com/...793992866742272

Here's an AMA from Kimbal Musk (Elon Musk's brother).


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#32
Jakob

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St. Kimbal Musk

FTFY


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#33
Jakob

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UV light enhancement system boosts crop yield by 26%

 

BioLumic, creators of the first ultraviolet (UV) crop yield enhancement system, today announced the close of $5 million in Series A financing. Led by top AgTech investors Finistere Ventures and Radicle Growth acceleration fund, with Rabobank’s recently launched Food and Agri Innovation Fund and existing investors from New Zealand also joining this round.

“We actively invest in data-driven technology startups who are changing the paradigm for sustainable AgTech from around the globe, and BioLumic was an ideal fit for us,” said Arama Kukutai, co-founder and partner, Finistere Ventures. “Using UV treatments to complement traditional chemicals or biologicals, BioLumic will give farmers a new way to enhance crop yield and vigor by activating stronger plant characteristics with the power of light.”

 

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