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Nanotechnology & Material Science News and Discussions

nanotechnology nano microtechnology micro material science metamaterials graphene atomic engineering molecular manufacturing nanobots

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#701
Sciencerocks

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Researchers achieve unprecedented control of polymer grids
June 21, 2018, Northwestern University

Synthetic polymers are ubiquitous—nylon, polyester, Teflon and epoxy, to name just a few—and these polymers are all long, linear structures that tangle into imprecise structures. Chemists have long dreamed of making polymers with two-dimensional, grid-like structures, but this goal has proven challenging.

The first examples of such structures, now known as covalent organic frameworks (COFs), were discovered in 2005, but their quality has been poor and preparation methods are uncontrolled. Now a Northwestern University research team is the first to produce high-quality versions of these materials, demonstrate their superior properties and control their growth.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...-grids.html#jCp



#702
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Multifunctional surface flips from sticky to slippery on demand

 

Surfaces are usually designed to have a certain topography, and you'll usually have to choose if they're sticky or slippery depending on what you need. But now, Harvard scientists have led an international team to develop a new surface that can reconfigure its shape, stickiness or slipperiness on demand, through the application of a magnetic field.

The team calls its creation a Ferrofluid-containing Liquid-infused Porous Surface (FLIPS), and as the extremely forced acronym suggests, it's designed to "flip" between different states. It does so through the interactions of its two composite parts – a liquid containing magnetic particles and a solid substrate with a tiny, textured structure.

 

https://newatlas.com...ickiness/55216/



#703
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Sintering atomically thin materials with ceramics now possible
June 29, 2018, Pennsylvania State University

For the first time, researchers have created a nanocomposite of ceramics and a two-dimensional material, opening the door for new designs of nanocomposites with such applications as solid-state batteries, thermoelectrics, varistors, catalysts, chemical sensors and much more.

Sintering uses high heat to compact powder materials into a solid form. Widely used in industry, ceramic powders are typically compacted at temperatures of 1472 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. Many low-dimensional materials cannot survive at those temperatures.

But a sintering process developed by a team of researchers at Penn State, called the cold sintering process (CSP), can sinter ceramics at much lower temperatures, less than 572 degrees F, saving energy and enabling a new form of material with high commercial potential.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...ramics.html#jCp



#704
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Why graphene hasn’t taken over the world...yet
 
https://www.theverge...technology-hype
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#705
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New Material Changes Shape, Prompted by Just Light

 

http://blogs.discove...ge-shape-light/

 

Introduction:

 

(Discover) We’re not always the same person. The jokes you tell at home aren’t necessarily the ones you tell at work, and I don’t know about you, but I certainly talked differently around my grandmother than I did around my friends. Linguistics people call this tendency code-switching. People are complicated, multi-faceted, and some situations bring out certain qualities in us — it makes sense.

 

But we’re not the only ones. Some materials “code-switch” too, acting differently based on different contexts. To take a familiar example, temperature (and pressure) determines whether water is liquid or solid. Well now, thanks to new research from MIT and the University of South Florida, scientists have gotten materials to code switch, in this case by changing their material structure and properties, simply by shining lights on them. It’s cool and futuristic, and might even be the basis of technology that leads to better self-healing materials and even novel drug delivery systems.


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#706
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Computer simulation identifies a key principle for next-generation carbon fibers
August 3, 2018, The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

 

Performing state-of-the-art computer simulations, a KAIST research team identified an atomistic design principle to produce high-quality, next-generation carbon fibers.

Carbon fibers are light-weight yet excellent in mechanical strength and thermal resistance. Boasting these properties, they can be diversely applied in high-technology sectors, including automotive, aerospace, and nuclear engineering.

They are produced from a polymer precursor through a series of spinning, stabilization, and carbonization processes. However, there is a major obstacle to producing high-quality carbon fibers. That is, when there exist ill-defined regions within the polymer matrices, they result in disorder and defects within the produced carbon fibers.

As a solution to this problem, it was proposed that the introduction of carbon nanotubes (CNT) could enhance polymer orientation and crystallization. However, although the alignment geometry of the CNT-polymer interface apparently affects the quality of produced fibers, the atomistic understanding of the CNT-polymer interface has so far been lacking, hindering further developments.

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...carbon.html#jCp


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#707
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This synthetic wood is as strong as the real thing—and won’t catch fire

 

http://www.sciencema...on-t-catch-fire

 

 

Introduction:

 

(Science) Plastic-wood composites have long been a favorite of homeowners looking to build decks and fences that don’t require sanding, staining, and painting. But these engineered woods typically aren’t as strong as natural wood and can be even more prone to catching fire. Now, researchers report they’ve created a synthetic wood (pictured) that matches natural wood’s strength and is flame resistant to boot.

 

One key to wood’s strength is a component called lignin, a natural polymer with a weblike structure that binds tiny crystallites of another component called cellulose together. The new composites replace lignin with a synthetic polymer version called resol, which has a similar weblike structure. Researchers used resol to bind a variety of different synthetic crystallites together into a family of different synthetic woods in which the color and other properties could be tailored by the crystallites added.

 

As the composites cure, they adopt a cell-like structure that looks like natural wood’s cellular structure. This helps the materials resist compression, lending them high strength. And because resol is fire retardant, the final composites don’t catch fire even when exposed to an open flame, the researchers report today in Science Advances.

 

And, unlike trees, which can take decades to grow, the new synthetic version takes shape in just hours.

 fire_16x9_1.jpg?itok=2pmYITTZ

SHU-HONG YU


Edited by wjfox, 12 August 2018 - 08:10 PM.
Fixed incorrect link

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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#708
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Schwarzites: Long-sought carbon structure joins graphene, fullerene family
August 13, 2018, University of California - Berkeley
 

The discovery of buckyballs surprised and delighted chemists in the 1980s, nanotubes jazzed physicists in the 1990s, and graphene charged up materials scientists in the 2000s, but one nanoscale carbon structure—a negatively curved surface called a schwarzite—has eluded everyone. Until now.

 

University of California, Berkeley, chemists have proved that three carbon structures recently created by scientists in South Korea and Japan are in fact the long-sought schwarzites, which researchers predict will have unique electrical and storage properties like those now being discovered in buckminsterfullerenes (buckyballs or fullerenes for short), nanotubes and graphene.

The new structures were built inside the pores of zeolites, crystalline forms of silicon dioxide—sand—more commonly used as water softeners in laundry detergents and to catalytically crack petroleum into gasoline. Called zeolite-templated carbons (ZTC), the structures were being investigated for possible interesting properties, though the creators were unaware of their identity as schwarzites, which theoretical chemists have worked on for decades.

 

 

Read more at: https://phys.org/new...lerene.html#jCp







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nanotechnology, nano, microtechnology, micro, material science, metamaterials, graphene, atomic engineering, molecular manufacturing, nanobots

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