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Nanotechnology & Material Science News and Discussions

nanotechnology nano microtechnology micro material science metamaterials graphene atomic engineering molecular manufacturing nanobots

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#781
Jessica

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New research integrates borophene and graphene into 2-D heterostructures

by Emily Ayshford, Northwestern University

Nanomaterials could provide the basis of many emerging technologies, including extremely tiny, flexible, and transparent electronics.

 

While many nanomaterials exhibit promising electronic properties, scientists and engineers are still working to best integrate these materials together to eventually create semiconductors and circuits with them.

Northwestern Engineering researchers have created two-dimensional (2-D) heterostructures from two of these materials, graphene and borophene, taking an important step toward creating intergrated circuits from these nanomaterials.

"If you were to crack open an integrated circuit inside a smartphone, you'd see many different materials integrated together," said Mark Hersam, Walter P. Murphy Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, who led the research. "However, we've reached the limits of many of those traditional materials. By integrating nanomaterials like borophene and graphene together, we are opening up new possibilities in nanoelectronics."

 

https://phys.org/new...structures.html



#782
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Uncovering the Secrets of the Toughest Fish Scales on Earth

 

https://www.courthou...cales-on-earth/

 

Extract:

 

(Courthouse News) – The design of the armor-like scales of an Amazonian fish could have military applications, researchers said in a study Wednesday.

 

…After researchers submerged arapaima scales in water for 48 hours, they began to tear the scales apart while also adding pressure to a central point.

 

…Understanding the structural design of the scales proved to be critical as scientists learned that the pressure could only deform the scale, and not break it, researchers said in the study, published in the journal Matter.

 

The scales’ hardened layers are fused together at “an atomistic level” by collagen, similar to the way layers of plastic webbing give bulletproof vests their toughness, researchers said in a statement.

 

Lead author and UC Berkeley researcher Robert Ritchie said that mineralized collagen gives the arapaima scales a hardness that scientists have not yet been able to replicate.

ArapaimaScales.jpg?resize=450%2C338

Closeup of the arapaima gigas’ scales.

(T. Voekler via Wikipedia)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#783
wjfox

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The next graphene? Shiny and magnetic, a new form of pure carbon dazzles with potential
 
Nov. 12, 2019 , 4:25 PM
 
A “happy accident” has yielded a new, stable form of pure carbon made from cheap feedstocks, researchers say. Like diamond and graphene, two other guises of carbon, the material seems to have extraordinary physical properties. It is harder than stainless steel, about as conductive, and as reflective as a polished aluminum mirror. Perhaps most surprising, the substance appears to be ferromagnetic, behaving like a permanent magnet at temperatures up to 125°C—a first for carbon. The discovery, announced by physicist Joel Therrien of the University of Massachusetts in Lowell on 4 November here at the International Symposium on Clusters and Nanomaterials, could lead to lightweight coatings, medical products, and novel electronic devices.
 
Therrien’s talk elicited both excitement and caution among the dozens of researchers attending the meeting. “Once it is published and the work has been replicated by others, it will generate a lot of interest for sure,” says Qian Wang, an applied physicist at Peking University in Beijing. She notes that carbon is much lighter than other ferromagnetic elements such as manganese, nickel, and iron. Moreover, carbon is nontoxic in the body, she says. “If it can be magnetic, it could be very useful for making biosensors or drug-delivery carriers” that could be magnetically interrogated or directed to diseased tissues.
 

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#784
eacao

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Uncovering the Secrets of the Toughest Fish Scales on Earth
 
https://www.courthou...cales-on-earth/
 
Extract:

 
(Courthouse News) – The design of the armor-like scales of an Amazonian fish could have military applications, researchers said in a study Wednesday.
 
…After researchers submerged arapaima scales in water for 48 hours, they began to tear the scales apart while also adding pressure to a central point.
 
…Understanding the structural design of the scales proved to be critical as scientists learned that the pressure could only deform the scale, and not break it, researchers said in the study, published in the journal Matter.
 
The scales’ hardened layers are fused together at “an atomistic level” by collagen, similar to the way layers of plastic webbing give bulletproof vests their toughness, researchers said in a statement.
 
Lead author and UC Berkeley researcher Robert Ritchie said that mineralized collagen gives the arapaima scales a hardness that scientists have not yet been able to replicate.

ArapaimaScales.jpg?resize=450%2C338
Closeup of the arapaima gigas’ scales.
(T. Voekler via Wikipedia)

I never knew “atomistic” was a word. Learn something new erry day

If you're going through hell, keep going. - Winston Churchill

You don't decide your future. You decide your habits, and your habits decide your future.
Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power. - Abraham Lincoln.


#785
Jessica

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Research reveals new state of matter: a Cooper pair metal

by Kevin Stacey, Brown University

For years, physicists have assumed that Cooper pairs, the electron duos that enable superconductors to conduct electricity without resistance, were two-trick ponies. The pairs either glide freely, creating a superconducting state, or create an insulating state by jamming up within a material, unable to move at all.

 

But in a new paper published in Science, a team of researchers has shown that Cooper pairs can also conduct electricity with some amount of resistance, like regular metals do. The findings describe an entirely new state of matter, the researchers say, that will require a new theoretical explanation.

 

https://phys.org/new...pair-metal.html



#786
Jessica

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Using aluminum and lasers to make bendable glass

by Bob Yirka , Phys.org

An international team of researchers has found a way to make bendable glass using lasers fired at crystalline aluminum oxide. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their technique and the features of the glass they produced. Lothar Wondraczek with the University of Jena has published a companion piece in the same journal issue outlining the history of scientists attempting to overcome the brittleness of glass.

 

Glass is somewhat strong, but only up to a point; it is also very brittle. If you drop a drinking glass, it will likely shatter on the floor. As Wondraczek notes, scientists have been searching for ways to make glass less brittle for as long as people have been making glass. Bendable glass would mean drinking glasses that survive a fall, or smartphone screens that do not crack. In this new effort, the researchers say they have taken a step toward that goal.

Ordinary glass is made from silica and oxygen, and it is known as an amorphous solid—a state in which a material's molecules are locked together—in the case of glass, in a random fashion. It is transparent because photons can pass through it without interacting with any of the electrons in the glass. In this new effort, the researchers used crystalline aluminum oxide instead of sand to make some tiny glass samples. To do so, they fired intense bursts of laser light at a sample to turn it into a purple plasma. The material was then allowed to cool on a substrate.

 

https://phys.org/new...able-glass.html







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nanotechnology, nano, microtechnology, micro, material science, metamaterials, graphene, atomic engineering, molecular manufacturing, nanobots

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