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Nanotechnology & Material Science News and Discussions

nanotechnology nano microtechnology micro material science metamaterials graphene atomic engineering molecular manufacturing nanobots

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#801
Jessica

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Nanodevices for the brain could thwart formation of Alzheimer's plaques

by Savannah Mitchem, Argonne National Laboratory

Alzheimer's disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, affecting one in 10 people over the age of 65. Scientists are engineering nanodevices to disrupt processes in the brain that lead to the disease.

 

People who are affected by Alzheimer's disease have a specific type of plaque, made of self-assembled molecules called β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, that build up in the brain over time. This buildup is thought to contribute to loss of neural connectivity and cell death. Researchers are studying ways to prevent the peptides from forming these dangerous plaques in order to halt development of Alzheimer's disease in the brain.

In a multidisciplinary study, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, along with collaborators from the Korean Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), have developed an approach to prevent plaque formation by engineering a nano-sized device that captures the dangerous peptides before they can self-assemble.

 

https://phys.org/new...-alzheimer.html



#802
Pisik

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Here is an extra source of information for the 39 year:

 

In this link you talk about Full Immersive Virtual Reality and its release in 2039, but you did not put any other sources than Ray Kurzweil's predictions, so here you have an scientific article about that, wich has predicted this for the same period (2040-2050) (I think you may change "2039" for "2040")


URL: Human Brain/Cloud Interface

 



#803
wjfox

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Here is an extra source of information for the 39 year:

 

In this link you talk about Full Immersive Virtual Reality and its release in 2039, but you did not put any other sources than Ray Kurzweil's predictions, so here you have an scientific article about that, wich has predicted this for the same period (2040-2050) (I think you may change "2039" for "2040")


URL: Human Brain/Cloud Interface

 

 

Awesome and very helpful, thank you.

 

I've been meaning to do a re-write of that prediction for a while now.



#804
Jessica

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A technique to produce patterned transition metal ditelluride layers for 2-D devices

by Ingrid Fadelli , Tech Xplore

Researchers at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) in South Korea have recently introduced a method to produce thin and patterned transition metal ditelluride films to be integrated in 2-D metal semiconductors. Their synthesis technique, presented in a paper published in Nature Electronics, could mitigate the challenges associated with the high contact resistance of existing electronics based on 2-D materials.

 

Since the discovery of graphene, a material with highly desirable properties for the development of electronics, other 2-D layered materials with similar characteristics have attracted substantial attention. These materials include transition metal chalcogenides, such as tungsten ditelluride and molybdenum ditelluride (WTe2 and MoTe2).

 



#805
caltrek

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Material That Can Heal Itself When Cut

 

https://techcrunch.c...tself-when-cut/

 

Introduction:

 

(TechCrunch) Scientists at Carnegie Mellon and the University of Tokyo are showcasing a new composite material with self-healing properties that take cues from lizard tails and starfish arms. MWCNTs-PBS — a composite of polyborosiloxane (PBS) and material multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) — is at the heart (so to speak) of the ‘Self-healing UI.’

 

When cut in two and places back together, the piece begin to reattach, and the seam disappears...


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#806
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A sensor only 11 atoms in size

 

29th May 2020

Researchers from Delft University of Technology, Netherlands, report the creation of a sensor only 11 atoms in size, which is able to capture magnetic waves.

The almost unimaginably tiny device, pictured below, consists of an antenna, a readout capability, a reset button and a memory unit. The team at Delft hope it can be used to learn more about the behaviour of magnetic waves, which could help to improve the efficiency of electronics in the future.

 

[...]

 

In addition to computing, what other real-world applications might emerge for a sensor on this scale? Perhaps trillions of them, printed on a robot's surface, could be used as a high-tech "skin"? Or maybe the devices, embedded in the outside of a spacecraft, could detect breaches?

For now, though, the research is at an early stage and the technical requirements of producing these sensors are too extreme, requiring 1K at ultra-high vacuum (10^-10 millibar) and the use of magnetic fields of up to 1.5T.

"However, if there is a way to make these sensors in less extreme conditions, this could build the way towards spintronics: electronics without any heating," explains the study's lead author. "It would be amazing (and possibly 'only' 30 years from now) if that is what future computers used for their processing: it's very energy efficient and very space-efficient. However, time will tell whether such developments are feasible."

 

https://www.futureti...-atoms-size.htm

 

 

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#807
Jessica

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29% More Energy Efficient Refrigeration With Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes
Brian Wang | June 1, 2020
 
nanofridge2-730x430.jpg

Power consumption of a home refrigerator can be cut by 29% while improving cooling capacity. Researchers replaced widely-used, but environmentally unfriendly, R134a refrigerant with the more energy-efficient R600a. They dosed R600a with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanoparticles.

nanofridge.jpg

A more energy-efficient refrigerant can result in much lower electricity bills. For vulnerable households, energy security can be improved as a result. Improved energy economy and demand-side management can also benefit planners at power utilities, as cooling accounts for about 40% of energy demand.

Energy Reports – Energy performance evaluation of R600a/MWCNT-nanolubricant as a drop-in replacement for R134a in household refrigerator system

 

https://www.nextbigf...-nanotubes.html







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nanotechnology, nano, microtechnology, micro, material science, metamaterials, graphene, atomic engineering, molecular manufacturing, nanobots

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