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Nanotechnology & Material Science News and Discussions

nanotechnology nano microtechnology micro material science metamaterials graphene atomic engineering molecular manufacturing nanobots

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#801
Jessica

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Nanodevices for the brain could thwart formation of Alzheimer's plaques

by Savannah Mitchem, Argonne National Laboratory

Alzheimer's disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, affecting one in 10 people over the age of 65. Scientists are engineering nanodevices to disrupt processes in the brain that lead to the disease.

 

People who are affected by Alzheimer's disease have a specific type of plaque, made of self-assembled molecules called β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, that build up in the brain over time. This buildup is thought to contribute to loss of neural connectivity and cell death. Researchers are studying ways to prevent the peptides from forming these dangerous plaques in order to halt development of Alzheimer's disease in the brain.

In a multidisciplinary study, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, along with collaborators from the Korean Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), have developed an approach to prevent plaque formation by engineering a nano-sized device that captures the dangerous peptides before they can self-assemble.

 

https://phys.org/new...-alzheimer.html



#802
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Here is an extra source of information for the 39 year:

 

In this link you talk about Full Immersive Virtual Reality and its release in 2039, but you did not put any other sources than Ray Kurzweil's predictions, so here you have an scientific article about that, wich has predicted this for the same period (2040-2050) (I think you may change "2039" for "2040")


URL: Human Brain/Cloud Interface

 



#803
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Here is an extra source of information for the 39 year:

 

In this link you talk about Full Immersive Virtual Reality and its release in 2039, but you did not put any other sources than Ray Kurzweil's predictions, so here you have an scientific article about that, wich has predicted this for the same period (2040-2050) (I think you may change "2039" for "2040")


URL: Human Brain/Cloud Interface

 

 

Awesome and very helpful, thank you.

 

I've been meaning to do a re-write of that prediction for a while now.



#804
Jessica

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A technique to produce patterned transition metal ditelluride layers for 2-D devices

by Ingrid Fadelli , Tech Xplore

Researchers at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) in South Korea have recently introduced a method to produce thin and patterned transition metal ditelluride films to be integrated in 2-D metal semiconductors. Their synthesis technique, presented in a paper published in Nature Electronics, could mitigate the challenges associated with the high contact resistance of existing electronics based on 2-D materials.

 

Since the discovery of graphene, a material with highly desirable properties for the development of electronics, other 2-D layered materials with similar characteristics have attracted substantial attention. These materials include transition metal chalcogenides, such as tungsten ditelluride and molybdenum ditelluride (WTe2 and MoTe2).

 



#805
caltrek

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Material That Can Heal Itself When Cut

 

https://techcrunch.c...tself-when-cut/

 

Introduction:

 

(TechCrunch) Scientists at Carnegie Mellon and the University of Tokyo are showcasing a new composite material with self-healing properties that take cues from lizard tails and starfish arms. MWCNTs-PBS — a composite of polyborosiloxane (PBS) and material multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) — is at the heart (so to speak) of the ‘Self-healing UI.’

 

When cut in two and places back together, the piece begin to reattach, and the seam disappears...


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#806
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A sensor only 11 atoms in size

 

29th May 2020

Researchers from Delft University of Technology, Netherlands, report the creation of a sensor only 11 atoms in size, which is able to capture magnetic waves.

The almost unimaginably tiny device, pictured below, consists of an antenna, a readout capability, a reset button and a memory unit. The team at Delft hope it can be used to learn more about the behaviour of magnetic waves, which could help to improve the efficiency of electronics in the future.

 

[...]

 

In addition to computing, what other real-world applications might emerge for a sensor on this scale? Perhaps trillions of them, printed on a robot's surface, could be used as a high-tech "skin"? Or maybe the devices, embedded in the outside of a spacecraft, could detect breaches?

For now, though, the research is at an early stage and the technical requirements of producing these sensors are too extreme, requiring 1K at ultra-high vacuum (10^-10 millibar) and the use of magnetic fields of up to 1.5T.

"However, if there is a way to make these sensors in less extreme conditions, this could build the way towards spintronics: electronics without any heating," explains the study's lead author. "It would be amazing (and possibly 'only' 30 years from now) if that is what future computers used for their processing: it's very energy efficient and very space-efficient. However, time will tell whether such developments are feasible."

 

https://www.futureti...-atoms-size.htm

 

 

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#807
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29% More Energy Efficient Refrigeration With Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes
Brian Wang | June 1, 2020
 
nanofridge2-730x430.jpg

Power consumption of a home refrigerator can be cut by 29% while improving cooling capacity. Researchers replaced widely-used, but environmentally unfriendly, R134a refrigerant with the more energy-efficient R600a. They dosed R600a with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanoparticles.

nanofridge.jpg

A more energy-efficient refrigerant can result in much lower electricity bills. For vulnerable households, energy security can be improved as a result. Improved energy economy and demand-side management can also benefit planners at power utilities, as cooling accounts for about 40% of energy demand.

Energy Reports – Energy performance evaluation of R600a/MWCNT-nanolubricant as a drop-in replacement for R134a in household refrigerator system

 

https://www.nextbigf...-nanotubes.html



#808
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Cornell University's laser activated robot is smaller than a paramecium, can be mass produced, and may someday travel through human tissue and blood

A Cornell University-led collaboration has created the first microscopic robots that incorporate semiconductor components, allowing them to be controlled—and made to walk—with standard electronic signals.
 
These robots, roughly the size of paramecium, provide a template for building even more complex versions that utilize silicon-based intelligence, can be mass produced, and may someday travel through human tissue and blood.
 
The collaboration is led by Itai Cohen, professor of physics, Paul McEuen, the John A. Newman Professor of Physical Science and their former postdoctoral researcher Marc Miskin, who is now an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania.
 
The team's paper, "Electronically Integrated, Mass-Manufactured, Microscopic Robots," published in Nature.

L9Zuywl.jpg
A microscopic robot alongside a paramecium. Credit: Cornell University


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#809
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Scientists Build Army Of 1 Million Microrobots That Can Fit Inside A Hypodermic Needle

A four-inch wafer of silicon has been turned into an army of one million microscopic, walking robots, thanks to some clever engineering employed by researchers at Cornell University in New York. 
 
In a paper, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, a team of roboticists detail the creation of their invisible army of robots, which are less than 0.1mm in size (about the width of a human hair) and cannot be seen with the naked eye. The robots are rudimentary and are reminiscent of Frogger, the famous 1980s arcade game. But they take advantage of an innovative, new class of actuators, which are the legs of the microrobots, designed by the team.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#810
caltrek

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Coconut Leaf Straw: Bengaluru Professor's Innovation Is Now Global Brand

https://thelogicalin...onut-leaf-23904

 

Introduction:

(The Logical Indian) A Bengaluru professor has developed a straw out of coconut leaves. Prof Saji Varghese who teaches English at the Christ University took the coconut leaves to a lab and steamed it under high pressure to discover it developed a natural shiny layer under heat. He decided to replace the common plastic straw with an organic alternative.

 

The invention has offered a new lease of life to rural women in coastal regions. Varghese's innovation could be a game-changer, especially at a time when plastic menace has acquired pandemic proportions.

 

The idea first came to him when he was walking back home from college and spotted a dry leaf. "I picked it up and noticed that the dry leaf had folded, giving it the shape of a straw," said the professor.

 

"I experimented with it for a few months and created a single-layered straw by binding it with food-grade glue. But it wasn't very sturdy." reported The Times Of India.

 

 When he found out that the straws were not strong enough, he started experimenting on how to improve the model. Finally, in 2018, Varghese successfully developed a multi-layered straw out of coconut leaf. His organic creation was not only anti-fungal but also was water-resistant for more than six hours, with a shelf life of over 12 months.

182135-english-professor-web.jpg

Image Credits: The Times Of India

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#811
Yuli Ban

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Researchers find path to nanodiamond from graphene

Marrying two layers of graphene is an easy route to the blissful formation of nanoscale diamond, but sometimes thicker is better.
While it may only take a bit of heat to turn a treated bilayer of the ultrathin material into a cubic lattice of diamane, a bit of pressure in just the right place can convert few-layer graphene as well.
The otherwise chemically driven process is theoretically possible according to scientists at Rice University, who published their most recent thoughts on making high-quality diamane — the 2D form of diamond — in the journal Small ("Nano-Thermodynamics of Chemically Induced Graphene–Diamond Transformation").


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#812
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Of Hemp's Many Uses, One of the Most Promising Could be in Construction

 

https://ensia.com/fe...rete-crops-co2/

 

Introduction:

(Ensia) It has become almost a cliché to discuss the benefits of hemp, the supposed wonder plant with almost endless uses — from woven fibers to edible seeds to bioplastics. “Of course, hemp is that magic crop that does everything,” says Nicholas Carter, an environmental researcher who, along with Tushar Mehta, a Toronto-based doctor, runs the website Plant Based Data. His work involves reading through scientific papers and studies and summarizing the most important work supporting plants as a source of food and other important uses. Given the hype, Carter wondered just how much power hemp really had. “I wanted to see the research out there on it, to see what’s actually real, what’s actually backed by evidence,” he says.

 

Magic? Not exactly. But Carter came away from his attempted debunking a hemp believer. And one of the most promising of its many uses, he found, is its application as a building material known as hempcrete.

 

Like its namesake concrete, hempcrete is a material mixed with a binder that hardens it into a solid in the form of blocks and panels. Made from the dried woody core of hemp stalks and a lime-based binder, hempcrete can be cast just like concrete. But unlike concrete and its binding cement, which accounts for about 8% of human-generated carbon dioxide emissions annually, hempcrete actually sequesters CO2. According to a recent study, hempcrete can sequester 307 kilograms of CO2 per cubic meter (19 pounds per cubic foot), roughly the equivalent of the annual carbon emissions of three refrigerators.

 

“While we’re growing it and building hempcrete, it’s sucking CO2 the whole time and encapsulating the CO2 in the structure,” says Eric McKee, founder of the U.S. Hemp Building Association.

Feature_hempcrete_inline2.jpg

Although not a direct replacement for concrete because of a lack of load bearing strength, hempcrete has many benefits as a building material.

Photo courtesy of IsoHemp


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#813
rajamanickam

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A team of researchers has amplified 3D graphene's electrical properties by controlling its curvature.
 
Their research showed the conservation and the degradation of the ultra-low dissipative transport of Dirac electrons on the 3D curved surface for the first time.

 

Watch more details at https://www.youtube....h?v=z3cqrirpaQo
 



#814
starspawn0

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Not exactly "nanotech", more micro-sensor tech, is this research:

https://www.nature.c...1378-020-0173-z

Magnetic sensing is present in our everyday interactions with consumer electronics and demonstrates the potential for the measurement of extremely weak biomagnetic fields, such as those of the heart and brain. In this work, we leverage the many benefits of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices to fabricate a small, low-power, and inexpensive sensor whose resolution is in the range of biomagnetic fields. At present, biomagnetic fields are measured only by expensive mechanisms such as optical pumping and superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), suggesting a large opportunity for MEMS technology in this work. The prototype fabrication is achieved by assembling micro-objects, including a permanent micromagnet, onto a postrelease commercial MEMS accelerometer using a pick-and-place technique. With this system, we demonstrate a room-temperature MEMS magnetic gradiometer. In air, the sensor’s response is linear, with a resolution of 1.1 nT cm−1, spans over 3 decades of dynamic range to 4.6 µT cm−1, and is capable of off-resonance measurements at low frequencies. In a 1 mTorr vacuum with 20 dB magnetic shielding, the sensor achieves a 100 pT cm−1 resolution at resonance. This resolution represents a 30-fold improvement compared with that of MEMS magnetometer technology and a 1000-fold improvement compared with that of MEMS gradiometer technology. The sensor is capable of a small spatial resolution with a magnetic sensing element of 0.25 mm along its sensitive axis, a >4-fold improvement compared with that of MEMS gradiometer technology. The calculated noise floor of this platform is 110 fT cm−1 Hz−1/2, and thus, these devices hold promise for both magnetocardiography (MCG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) applications.


That sounds amazing! It sounds like they have achieved using a cheap MEMS device what previously took SQUIDS (=Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) or OPMs (=Optically-pumped magnetometers), both of which are expensive and usually involve exotic materials (like rubidium vapor sensors).

In fact, it sounds insane! This means we could see cheap, wearable brain scanners and body scanners (e.g. heart monitors), that read the body's faint biomagnetic signals. It's like something off of Star Trek.

....

I think a sensor technology that would be truly disruptive is a cheap, tiny (chip-sized), room temperature and higher, robust-to-noise, durable (long-lasting), super-accurate full tensor gravity gradiometer. I can think of lots and lots of uses of such a thing; but it would probably be outlawed, due to security concerns -- maybe it can be kept hidden inside of products, like the dangerous materials inside some fire alarms.

One use of such a thing is that it would allow driverless cars to tell whether an object in front of them is light and harmless (like a plastic bag) or a big, heavy hunk of metal that looks like a plastic bag, but isn't. The same for home robots. They would know not to run into something, as it's bulky and heavy.

#815
Yuli Ban

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Squeezing a rock-star material could make it stable enough for solar cells

Among the materials known as perovskites, one of the most exciting is a material that can convert sunlight to electricity as efficiently as today's commercial silicon solar cells and has the potential for being much cheaper and easier to manufacture.
There's just one problem: Of the four possible atomic configurations, or phases, this material can take, three are efficient but unstable at room temperature and in ordinary environments, and they quickly revert to the fourth phase, which is completely useless for solar applications.
Now scientists at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have found a novel solution: Simply place the useless version of the material in a diamond anvil cell and squeeze it at high temperature. This treatment nudges its atomic structure into an efficient configuration and keeps it that way, even at room temperature and in relatively moist air.
The researchers described their results in Nature Communications.


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#816
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Columbia Engineers Use DNA Nanotechnology to Build Tough 3D Nanomaterials

Columbia Engineers use DNA nanotechnology to create highly resilient synthetic nanoparticle-based materials that can be processed through conventional nanofabrication methods.
 
Columbia Engineering researchers, working with Brookhaven National Laboratory, report today that they have built designed nanoparticle-based 3D materials that can withstand a vacuum, high temperatures, high pressure, and high radiation. This new fabrication process results in robust and fully engineered nanoscale frameworks that not only can accommodate a variety of functional nanoparticle types but also can be quickly processed with conventional nanofabrication methods.
 
“These self-assembled nanoparticles-based materials are so resilient that they could fly in space,” says Oleg Gang, professor of chemical engineering and of applied physics and materials science, who led the study published today (March 19, 201) by Science Advances. “We were able to transition 3D DNA-nanoparticle architectures from liquid state — and from being a pliable material — to solid state, where silica re-enforces DNA struts. This new material fully maintains its original framework architecture of DNA-nanoparticle lattice, essentially creating a 3D inorganic replica. This allowed us to explore — for the first time — how these nanomaterials can battle harsh conditions, how they form, and what their properties are.”


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#817
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First ever 3D atomic imaging of amorphous solid

 

9th April 2021

Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), have solved a 100-year-old problem in science – capturing the 3D structure of an amorphous solid, in this case metallic glass.

 

Read more: https://www.futureti...phous-solid.htm

 

 



#818
caltrek

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Design Graduate Develops Alternative For Single-Use Plastic From Fish Waste, Algae
 

https://thelogicalin...ste-algae-27387

 

Introduction:

(The Logical Indian) A product design graduate from the University of Sussex, Lucy Hughes, has invented a biodegradable and compostable material from fish waste and sustainable algae as a replacement for single-use plastic films.

 

The product, named MarinaTex, is the winner of 2019's James Dyson Award. The new bioplastic looks like conventional plastic, but unlike the latter, it can be consumed by a fish if it escapes into the ocean.

 

 It is a translucent material and more potent than low-density polyethene (LDPE), at the same thickness. It is a great alternative to plastic for various products, including carry-bags, bakery bags, sandwich packs etc.

 

 The material does not require particular infrastructure to dispose of and can biodegrade naturally in 4-6 weeks. The material does not require much energy to produce. The temperature required for the production process is below 100 degrees.

 

 Hughes created MarinaTex as a final year project at the university. She was keen to develop something out of waste products.

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#819
Jessica

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Nanotechnology plays major role in COVID-19 vaccine development
  •  
Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 15 2020

From mRNA vaccines entering clinical trials, to peptide-based vaccines and using molecular farming to scale vaccine production, the COVID-19 pandemic is pushing new and emerging nanotechnologies into the frontlines and the headlines.

Nanoengineers at UC San Diego detail the current approaches to COVID-19 vaccine development, and highlight how nanotechnology has enabled these advances, in a review article in Nature Nanotechnology published July 15.

"Nanotechnology plays a major role in vaccine design," the researchers, led by UC San Diego Nanoengineering Professor Nicole Steinmetz, wrote. Steinmetz is also the founding director of UC San Diego's Center for Nano ImmunoEngineering.

 

https://www.news-med...evelopment.aspx



#820
backtothefuture30

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First ever 3D atomic imaging of amorphous solid

 

9th April 2021

Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), have solved a 100-year-old problem in science – capturing the 3D structure of an amorphous solid, in this case metallic glass.

 

Read more: https://www.futureti...phous-solid.htm

 

 

I didn't know anything about this incredible information. Thank you so much for sharing the link.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: nanotechnology, nano, microtechnology, micro, material science, metamaterials, graphene, atomic engineering, molecular manufacturing, nanobots

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