Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

The 1950s

1950s retrofuturism Eisenhower Soviet Union Cold War Fallout 1945 1963 Truman Golden Age science fiction

  • Please log in to reply
58 replies to this topic

#41
kjaggard

kjaggard

    Artificer

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,982 posts
  • Locationwhere fanciful imaginings and hard won knowledge meet to genesis the future.

I keep wanting to get a few of the makers I know together and see if we could create the future that they thought we'd have now. Like full on just make that retro future real as far as we can. passenger drone flying car, housework robot, push button meal preperation, etc. I look at the predictions that 'haven't happened' and mostly it's because we went another direction, not because it's impossible.


  • Yuli Ban, Erowind and BasilBerylium like this
Live content within small means. Seek elegance rather than luxury, Grace over fashion and wealth over riches.
Listen to clouds and mountains, children and sages. Act bravely, think boldly.
Await occasions, never make haste. Find wonder and awe, by experiencing the everyday.

#42
Sciencerocks

Sciencerocks

    Member

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,326 posts

I keep wanting to get a few of the makers I know together and see if we could create the future that they thought we'd have now. Like full on just make that retro future real as far as we can. passenger drone flying car, housework robot, push button meal preperation, etc. I look at the predictions that 'haven't happened' and mostly it's because we went another direction, not because it's impossible.

 

 

Exactly,

 

All the wealth want back to the wealthy as the wealthy brainwashed the population to turn against unions and their right to have a fair and decent wage. Good luck affording a house hold robot or a flying car with the wages people make these days...Hell, society doesn't even invest in infrastructure anymore for the most part.

 

How insane.

 

I think if assholes like Reagan, Bushs and Trumps never got into power the future would have want more like we expected.



#43
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

l-vp6kq7p299gtlx.jpg


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#44
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

l-02d9wgtxoi4jyy.jpg


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#45
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

Vintage television!

l-ygl0duj7b2dj2p.jpg


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#46
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

The 50s truly began in 1947.

l-uy8dr41bf4e5kt.jpg


  • wjfox likes this

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#47
wjfox

wjfox

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,439 posts
  • LocationLondon

DGDNwbX.png


  • zEVerzan and Yuli Ban like this

#48
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,569 posts

How A Small Virginia Diner Tried to Overcome Segregation

 

https://www.motherjo...-bach-yo-yo-ma/

 

Introduction:

(Mother Jones) Since its beginnings in 1952, Wright’s Dairy-Rite served all people, of any color. That may have been unusual in Staunton, Virginia, at the time, but the custard shop’s owner, Alka Greer Wright, believed in serving everybody.

 

“She felt that everybody needed to be treated the same,” her son, Forester Wright Jr., told the Staunton News Leader. While it was common back then for restaurants to have separate entrances for people of color, Wright’s Dairy-Rite just had the one door. “Everybody came to the front. They’d get in line, we’d ask them what they want, and they ate their ice cream with everybody else.”

 

A dozen years later, in 1964, after the ice cream stand had been turned into a “Happy Days”-style fast-food restaurant, Wright Jr. met a very determined 16-year-old woman named Barbara Lee. She asked to be the first African-American to serve customers curbside.

 

Wright hesitated, worried that she would be subject to harassment from customers. But Lee insisted—and got the job. Wright would often listen in on the call box to make sure Lee was safe outside. One night, six white boys pulled up and threw a tray at her, and Lee, scared, left immediately. Though she got home safely, she quit because of the incident.

 

More than a half-century later, the two met again at the Dairy-Rite, where the Staunton News Leader filmed an interview with them. Sharing a booth, Wright said he’d always respected Lee for what she did. “There was an angel looking out for me, and I did not know it,” Lee said, looking at Wright. “And he was my angel.”

20181002-dairy-rite-recharge.jpg?w=990

An old photo of Wright's Dairy-Rite, screenshot courtesy of the Staunton News Leader.

Mike Tripp/Staunton News Leader


  • Erowind likes this

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#49
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

vZgpjW2.jpg


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#50
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

White Sands, 1957

I love '50s UFOs. They look so raw and so fake. If they're real, it's especially strange to imagine them in such low-tech times (doubly so in low-tech places, like rural Scandinavia, Africa, or the American West). They're a fundamental part of the 1950s to me.

HyBmAvZ.jpg


  • Erowind likes this

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#51
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

Here's George Adamski's pisspoor lampshade with ping pong balls UFO

Nc0jrs6.jpg


  • Erowind likes this

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#52
Bubbles

Bubbles

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Interesting how there was a surge of flying saucer sightings in the late 40’s and 50’s, precisely when the aviation industry was booming, acquired new technologies from WW2 and commercial flights expanded. 



#53
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

^ I was just thinking about this last night. I live relatively close to a military airport, so I see & hear planes and helicopters all the time but not so close that I can hear them take off. At night, an aircraft flying at an odd angle can look otherworldly because you just see this diagonal or triangular slant in the sky. 

 

Now consider that most people had never actually seen planes or helicopters in the 1940s and 1950s. They had certainly heard of them and may have seen pictures of them, but there were few commercial airliners and those were exclusive to the wealthy. Most airplanes were military in nature. Most pilots were part of the air force. If you were in the USA, UK, Germany, Japan, these countries, you were definitely familiar with airplanes, but elsewhere, they were just a rare sight from the wealthier nations.

 

It's sort of like how we don't have many clear visions or ideas of what a flying car/passenger drone highway might look like at night (though I found a decent comparison with Chinese lanterns a few years back)— when people thought of planes, they typically imagined them the way you might see them in a magazine or in a newsreel rather than in reality. They didn't much think of all the signal lights that would be on them. And when jet planes were new, you heard entirely new sounds in the sky no one had ever heard before. 

 

So take all that into consideration and now imagine a rancher or small town suburbanite in the early 1950s, someone who had certainly heard of airplanes but had only seen a few military and small civilian craft on occasion. Now it's night time and here comes an early jet plane being flown. This person has absolutely no clue what he's looking at. It's a bundle of lights in the sky, seemingly floating at an odd angle and moving faster than he'd known planes to move. When he goes to ask others what he just saw, they have no clue either. They can't just check the internet since that won't exist for another half century for them. The news doesn't mention it either. It's a mystery.

 

Of course he'd think he had just seen little green men shooting across the sky!


  • Maximus and Bubbles like this

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#54
Bubbles

Bubbles

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

^^^ Also too I'm sure militaries at the time were testing new kinds of aircraft with I guess we can say... an unconventional appearance to them. At the time, the US and USSR were in an arms race and were surely testing new kinds of aircraft to spy on each others nuclear facilities. Since they wanted to keep these tests in secrecy, the legends of extraterrestrial ships, government conspiracies and other sensational nonsense gained momentum when something slipped out. And the private sector was in the midst of capitalizing on new military technologies and making commercial jets.

 

Obviously, the military tests were not successful and didn't catch on because we're not flying in saucer-shaped aircraft today.



#55
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

I keep wanting to get a few of the makers I know together and see if we could create the future that they thought we'd have now. Like full on just make that retro future real as far as we can. passenger drone flying car, housework robot, push button meal preperation, etc. I look at the predictions that 'haven't happened' and mostly it's because we went another direction, not because it's impossible.

Actually, it partially *is* because it's impossible. Passenger drones are fine and all, but even airline companies don't use 100% autopilot yet. For passenger drones to truly take flight, we need autonomous vehicle technology to progress and that will only happen with further advances in computing power and artificial intelligence.  Same deal with domestic robots and automated chefs. Machine learning is almost but not quite there and absolutely wouldn't work out otherwise. An analog system that tries to emulate it would be so complex that a little pebble getting clogged could shut the whole thing down.

 

If anything, computing power is only just now allowing us to realize the dreams of earlier decades like the 1950s and the 1980s. We grew so accustomed to those dreams being squashed by our dismal computing capabilities that we even stopped thinking of them as realistic. 

Like with vertical-landing rocket ships... The Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy landings are straight outta 1950s sci-fi, and I mean literally. It's computers that allow for such a thing to happen so accurately and smoothly. 

Ray guns exist, but they require loads of energy. Without room temperature superconductors and superbatteries, there's no way to make them really useful.


  • Erowind likes this

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#56
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

Computers and Automation Scare of the 1950s


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#57
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

The Rise of Fast Food Industry in the 1950s


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#58
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

The Rise of Suburban Areas during 1950s

 

 

So with those posted, I want to do a little bit of reflection. 

The '50s was an era of extreme optimism, likely due to the darkness of the Depression and WWII. 

The reason why the '50s were so socially conservative is because of the Cold War, essentially. It's why there was such a juxtaposition of social conservatism with economic progressivism— Jim Crow, Stepford Wives, suburban conformity, whitewashing, etc. alongside 90% income tax rates and massive government projects & the continuation of the New Deal. Sort of like a more benign version of national-socialism. They wanted to make communism unappealing to the restless working class while also contrasting Western values from Soviet communism. 

Moral guardians had a field day. Since we were trying to combat the Reds, we needed propaganda. We needed to establish an identity of what "Americana" meant. So that gave them full authority to create a WASP utopia in media to contrast with the Russo-Slavic "Worker's Paradise". 

 

It helped that America emerged from WWII almost entirely unscathed. We didn't lose millions nor did we suffer infrastructural losses (which meant that the millions of returning GIs needed something to return to). Indeed, I posit that America surviving WWII is the only reason why civilization as we know it has even come as far as it has— the war in Eurasia simply knocked out all the other world powers in some way. Our closest rival, the Soviet Union, lost something like 40 million people and a massive chunk of their industrial capacity which they had to replace on short order. China came just as close, except they also had loads of other wars and rebellions doing further damage. No American money in Western Europe means Western Europe either falls to communism or collapses outright. Same deal as Japan. And at this point in world history, communists were still building up. Capitalists had well over a century headstart, being able to utilize industrial capacity going back to the 18th century. Communists mainly took power in places that were either barely industrial or even pre-industrial, hence why they kept failing. It's like trying to create technism is a contemporary society, well before we have fully-autonomous machines or cognitive agents. 

 

So all of these factors combined gave us "Americana" and the sense in the 1950s that the future heralded boundless prosperity (as long as we could defeat Those Silly Commies). 

 

It also happened that the 1950s was the age where digital computers were starting to come into their own and we vastly overestimated their near-future capabilities. The 1950s was the birth of the fields of artificial intelligence, transhumanism, and space exploration after all. 

 

Of course, I do stress that it was the birth of these fields. It makes about as much sense to expect instant results as it is to expect a newborn to get a career. The toal computing power was pitifully puny, understanding of biology was severely lacking and still heavily based on Old Wives' Tales, and we didn't know much about worlds beyond Earth other than that they existed— we often used science fiction and fanciful speculation from ancient and 19th century philosophers to speculate on what things might be like. What's more, the actual number of people working in these fields was much smaller than widely believed; the total advanced-STEM field of America circa 1959 would probably fill up a single one of those fields today. But they got lucky— there was quite a lot of low-hanging fruit left to be plucked. 

We now stand on their shoulders today, struggling to progress past what they invented & discovered. It's becoming increasingly obvious that those "low-hanging fruits" were actually probably among the highest-hanging for any human-only endeavors. The amount of science we could do without computers & artificial intelligence basically peaked in the 1970s. Without digital computing via the transistor, we'd have stagnated 50 years ago. We are constantly anxious about an impending stagnation because I think we're unconsciously aware of this fact.

 

The '50s was still a bit before that, so it makes sense that, to them, the future was still so bright. Computers hadn't completely upended society and caused the miasma of aftereffects we know and "love" nowadays so it seemed like the coming age of prosperity would basically be an even better version of the '50s. Even if machines replaced all labor, that didn't mean they'd replace what makes us human! It was still an era where a single lone-wolf inventor could potentially change the world in his garage or where a single scientist could make revolutionary insights, something that's nearly impossible nowadays. It's certainly more Romantic to imagine us returning to that "norm", but it's woefully misunderstanding why there was a norm in the first place. 


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#59
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,581 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

The Simple Mistakes That Killed 1950s Homeowners

Dr Suzannah Lipscomb looks at the hidden dangers of the British post-war home. In the 1950s, people embraced modern design for the first time after years of austerity and self-denial. The modern home featured moulded plywood furniture, fibreglass, plastics and polyester - materials and technologies that were developed during World War II.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: 1950s, retrofuturism, Eisenhower, Soviet Union, Cold War, Fallout, 1945, 1963, Truman, Golden Age science fiction

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users