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2017 UK General Election News and Discussions

UK 2017 Theresa May Tories LibDems Labour Conservatives England Brexit Parliament

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#181
wjfox

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#182
Yuli Ban

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Theresa May to launch extreme internet plans despite not winning majority

Theresa May looks set to launch wide-ranging internet regulation and plans to fundamentally change how technology works despite not having won a majority.
In the speech in which she committed to keep governing despite calls to stand down, the prime minister made reference to extending powers for the security services. Those powers – which include regulation of the internet and forcing internet companies to let spies read everyone's private communications – were a key part of the Conservative campaign, which failed to score a majority in the House of Commons.
In the speech, given in Downing Street after losing her majority but still looking to form a government, she laid out a series of plans that she hopes to carry out at what she called a "critical time for our country".

If it goes through, say goodbye to the tech sector and comp-sci in Britain.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#183
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#184
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So it begins - Owen Paterson suggests reducing abortion limit to get DUP support

 

https://www.reddit.c...gests_reducing/


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#185
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Theresa May to launch extreme internet plans despite not winning majority

Theresa May looks set to launch wide-ranging internet regulation and plans to fundamentally change how technology works despite not having won a majority.
In the speech in which she committed to keep governing despite calls to stand down, the prime minister made reference to extending powers for the security services. Those powers – which include regulation of the internet and forcing internet companies to let spies read everyone's private communications – were a key part of the Conservative campaign, which failed to score a majority in the House of Commons.
In the speech, given in Downing Street after losing her majority but still looking to form a government, she laid out a series of plans that she hopes to carry out at what she called a "critical time for our country".

If it goes through, say goodbye to the tech sector and comp-sci in Britain.

 

 

 

Conseravtism is quickly becoming the number one enemy of modern civilization....It must be wiped from the face of this planet or we're all fucked.



#186
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The more I read about the DUP, the more they remind me of Norsefire. Really, I wouldn't at all be shocked if they could at one point have had Ian Paisley as their leader with Oswald Mosley as their chairman and Enoch Powell as their deputy leader. 

 

And yes, I know Paisley formed the group. I'm just saying.


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#187
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The more I read about the DUP, the more they remind me of Norsefire. Really, I wouldn't at all be shocked if they could at one point have had Ian Paisley as their leader with Oswald Mosley as their chairman and Enoch Powell as their deputy leader. 

 

And yes, I know Paisley formed the group. I'm just saying.

 

 

I am hoping for WJFOX's sake that the moderate conservatives join with the Labor to vote May out of power.



#188
Yuli Ban

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Westminster voting intention: LAB: 45% (+5) CON: 39% (-3) LDEM: 7% (-) UKIP: 3% (+1) (via @Survation / 10 Jun) Chgs. w/ GE2017
 
Remember that time the Tories were 25 points ahead?
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enazj

It's like May saw Clinton's campaign and said 'let's do that, but worse'.


I didn't even think that was fucking possible, but somehow Theresa May blew my mind like a shotgun with how bombastically bad she fucked up.


Anywho, I will say that we should buckle up for the ride. A lot of people think that this government's going to collapse and we'll be seeing a Prime Minister Corbyn by the end of the week. That or the Conservative-DUP alliance will collapse spectacularly. But we're forgetting the reason why any of this is happening in the first place— Brexit. As long as that's still going to happen (and it will), this government will survive to at least negotiate. 

What's more, we're seeing definitive proof that Labour will crush the Tories in the inevitable follow-up. Do you think the Tories would be that thick as to call another election? The reason why they called the first one was as a gamble to obtain more power. It seemed as if they had a 99% chance of doing so. It just so happened that results came back and the 1% chance of a failure actually occurred. That happens. But if it's rare for that to happen, it's statistically impossible for it to happen twice in a row. In this case, they have a 99% chance of losing. Holding another election means losing power, and there's nothing an entrenched political party likes less than giving up power. Even the dumbest of people understand that. 

 

So couple Brexit negotiations with certain defeat and you basically have an England that's stuck with an unstable, ultraconservative government until further notice.


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#189
Yuli Ban

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"Do you approve or disapprove of Theresa May’s decision to govern with agreed support from the Democratic Unionist Party?"
Approve 33%
Disapprove 47%
Don’t know 20%
http://mailchi.mp/su...-sunday-1118541

Some will say "Wow, almost 50% think May bungled it all up!" but I think the worrying thing is that 1 in 3 Britons think she made the right choice.

Seriously. Imagine if Rupert Murdoch decides to get his revenge by riling up that Third and, in three years, there's a British equivalent to the Tea Party that's like a more competent version of UKIP. His media machine would just have to work around the clock even moreso than it already has, and by the end of it, you could have a sizeable portion of British society that "wants debates on the veracity of" things like climate change, evolution, homosexual rights, and whatnot. Because from what I could understand, despite how right wing Britain is, it's still culturally much further to the left than America currently is. And this is despite how prevalent Murdoch's media machine is in British society compared to how prevalent more liberal-leaning press is in America. All it takes is that one seed...


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#190
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Polls for the Sunday Times, 11th June 2017 –
 
Theresa May should...
• Stand Down: 48%
• Stay: 38%
 
Who would make the better Prime Minister?
• Theresa May: 39%
• Jeremy Corbyn: 39%

 

 

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#191
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Not sure who wrote this (it was posted on another forum).

 

Interesting theory. :biggrin:

 

----------

 

Last summer I was on a train travelling through Spain when I heard the outcome of the Conservative leadership election. As the modern, comfortable high-speed train sped through the hundreds of kilometres of sundrenched, already harvested wheat fields north of Madrid, through which I saw no future Spanish prime minister running, I was still in shock over the outcome of the Brexit referendum. Why was this happening? How could we be leaving the EU and the Single Market that Mrs Thatcher fought so hard to achieve?

The thought of any of the other candidates for the leadership winning filled me with horror. But as I sat on that train reading the news that Theresa May was to be Prime Minister, a curious reaction immediately came into my mind: "God is Great". I immediately shared this in a Guardian blog and the reply came back from another reader: "I thought that too".

What I was already thinking was this: given the closeness of the referendum result, and the fact that only a minority of the electorate (some 37%) had voted to leave, but, above all, that Britain's national interest was utterly opposed to the idea that continental Europe could the first time in almost a thousand years (with the exception of the Nazi period) become impervious to the British foreign policy strategy of Divide and Rule, to prevent any one country totally dominating the rest, somehow the British Establishment would find a way over the next few years to sabotage the attack on our country from the very un-British UKIP and its fellow travellers.

With hindsight I understand that my reaction to Mrs May's "coronation" was a premonition that it was the beginning of the inevitable counterattack by the British Establishment. But what I did not foresee was how quickly Brexit would be derailed. I imagined that Mrs May would play for time, delay Article 50 for as long as possible, use the threat of walking away and a hard Brexit to frighten the nation, and then let the negotiations get bogged down for years in endless wrangling over minutiae whilst the electorate became bored with the whole thing, and the older EU-hating voters gradually died off.

What I did not foresee is that Mrs May would sacifice herself in the way she has for the national interest. Mrs May is an extremely intelligent woman, a clever political operator and a highly experienced politician. Like Mrs Thatcher, she was not born with a silver spoon in her mouth. She was a grammar school girl at Oxford, at a time when to be a grammar school boy or girl at Oxbridge invited ridicule and contempt from many public school types who could still get in through the influence of their parents and connections, even with terrible A-level results. Only those who experienced this kind of behaviour can know how traumatic it was, although it is brilliantly documented in the opening pages of Evelyn Waugh's "Decline and Fall".

What Mrs May has done is to drive the Brexit train into a brick wall, at the cost of her own political career, exposing herself to ridicule and contempt, for the sake of her country. Her political instinct is extraordinary. Perhaps it is her Christianity, her concern for ordinary people, and her detachment from the Westminster bubble that led her to realise that this election would be decided above all by the people's attitude towards austerity.

From the insertion of policies in the Conservative manifesto that would deliberately upset and put off older voters, to "no deal is better than a bad deal", to signals to the electorate that another five years of Tory rule would mean another five years of falling living standards and ever worsening public services, to the use of deliberately staged clumsy u-turns, or even an instinct that Jeremy Corbyn was not the man that the media protrayed, it is now clear that Mrs May went to the country, not to increase her majority, but to lose it. It is now plain as a pikestaff to me that she called the election in order to sabotage Brexit.

Mrs May is a political genius of the first order.She also has many of the qualities of a saint. I salute her and empathise with her. She has sacrificed herself and her reputation for the good of the country in a way no politician has done since Winston Churchill. One day, many years from now, perhaps her service to the nation will be openly recognised. For now it can only be acknowledged behind closed doors.

God is great.


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#192
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England

1997 Blair 11,348,623 votes
2017 Corbyn 11,386,624 votes


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#193
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Westminster

10 June 2017


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#194
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#195
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Mike Galsworthy‏:

https://twitter.com/...881804444491776



#196
Yuli Ban

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#197
Mike the average

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EU could have been much more influential on the UK election. Hopefully they are aggressive on a soft brexit.
'Force always attracts men of low morality' - Einstein
'Great spirits always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds' - Einstein

#198
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Michael Gove (newly-appointed Environment Secretary) and his record of voting against preventing climate change, and for selling off forests:

https://www.theywork...tes#environment



#199
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UK election result 'may delay Brexit talks'

12 June 2017

 

The UK general election result could delay Brexit talks and be negative for the economy, credit ratings agencies Moody's and S&P have warned.

The Brexit negotiations with the EU were due to start on 19 June but Moody's said the fact that the Conservatives had lost their majority would delay the start of the talks.

It will "complicate and probably delay Brexit negotiations," it warned.

Moody's said it could also further pressure the UK's public finances.

The "inconclusive" outcome of the general election could mean the government places less of a priority on cutting the budget deficit. This would be negative for the UK's credit rating and make it more expensive for the country to borrow money.

As a result, Moody's said it expected fiscal risks to increase, because in its view the budget deficit will increase this year and next.

"The election outcome, with significant gains for the Labour Party, which had campaigned for increased public spending, will likely be seen as a 'vote against austerity', it added.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-40247524


“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

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#200
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Michael Gove (newly-appointed Environment Secretary) and his record of voting against preventing climate change, and for selling off forests:

https://www.theywork...tes#environment

 

Jesus, we just can't seem to get rid of this guy.


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