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New Doctor Who is Female

Doctor Who Science Fiction Time Travel BBC TV

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#21
caltrek

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Jodie Whittaker Set for Historical Introduction in 'Doctor Who' Christmas Special

 

https://www.msn.com/...ID=ansmsnnews11

 

Introduction:

 

(The Hollywood Reporter) The world's longest running science-fiction TV series, BBC's Doctor Who, is set for a historic moment in its upcoming Christmas Special, which airs around the world on December 25.

 

Titled Twice Upon A Time, the one-hour episode will, for the first time in the show's 54-year history, introduce a female to play the lead role of the Earth-loving time-traveler. 

 

John Hurt (Alien), David Tennant (Jessica Jones) and Matt Smith (The Crown) have all portrayed the mysterious Time Lord known as "The Doctor" since the show's 1963 launch. Oscar-winner Peter Capaldi is currently playing the part of the Twelfth Doctor.

 

Christmas Day 2017 will see the debut of Jodie Whittaker as the Thirteenth Doctor.

 

The actress made an impressive debut in the 2006 feature Venus opposite Peter O'Toole and went on to star in the St Trinians movies and Joe Cornish's Attack the Block (also starring Star Wars' John Boyega). But it was on the small screen where Whittaker was established as a name in the U.K. with three seasons of Broadchurch, from new Doctor Who showrunner Chris Chibnall.

 

 

So, did anyone catch the special?


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#22
rennerpetey

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So, did anyone catch the special?

As the resident Whovian, it was fantastic.  It's gonna be so fun, having a young doctor again.


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#23
caltrek

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I did happen to be able to view the show after all.  I greatly appreciated the humor and identified with the elderly characters. Still, for the show to appeal to a new generation of viewers, it is probably not a bad idea to return to a Dr. Who that appears to be younger.

 

In the meant time, the show was filled with many funny punch lines, making it a comedy as much as science fiction. In this instance, a blend that worked rather nicely together, I thought.


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#24
rennerpetey

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This is the new logo.  Not only are we getting a new doctor, we are getting a new showrunner and head-writer.  Also probably a new Tardis(interior) and sonic screw driver along with some new companions.  Its basically a new show.  They do this every few years to mix it up.  this is how a show that started in 1963 can still be around today. 


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#25
RoseTylerFan

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If the Doctor is female, will her companions now be male?



#26
rennerpetey

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If the Doctor is female, will her companions now be male?

Bradley Walsh, Tosin Cole and Mandip Gill announced as Jodie Whittaker’s companions

 

The BBC has announced Jodie Whittaker’s Doctor Who will have three companions.

 
The Chase host Bradley Walsh, along with former Hollyoaks actors Tosin Cole and Mandip Gill, will join the 13th Doctor. 
 
Walsh will play the characters Graham, Cole will star as Ryan and Gill will play Yasmin.
 
"I remember watching William Hartnell as the first Doctor,” Walsh told the BBC. “Black and white made it very scary for a youngster like myself.

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#27
RoseTylerFan

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Three companions are already a crowd. One-to-one relationships between the Tenth and Rose or Eleventh and Clara were more interesting for me.



#28
rennerpetey

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Three companions are already a crowd. One-to-one relationships between the Tenth and Rose or Eleventh and Clara were more interesting for me.

I think they did play Amy, Rory, and The Doctor pretty well.  That was more interesting than just Amy and The Doctor for me.  3 does seem like a lot though.  Maybe they won't all be companions at the same time, maybe they change companions halfway through the season.


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#29
caltrek

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Global simulcast premier in approximately 15 minutes.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#30
rennerpetey

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I saw it.  It was ok, I think Jodie could be great, but Chibnall isn't ready to be head writer.


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#31
caltrek

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Kids want to see more female superheroes, according to new study

 

http://www.latimes.c...1008-story.html

 

Introduction:

 

(Los Angeles Times) Most kids want to see more female superheroes and superheroes that look like them.

 

According to a new study by the Women’s Media Center and BBC America released Monday, most girls believe there are not enough female role models, strong female characters and relatable female characters on film and television. Both girls and boys agree that they’d like to see more female superheroes on-screen.

 

The study, “Superpowering Girls: Female Representation in the Sci-Fi/Superhero Genre,” is the first in a series examining how on-screen representation affects children’s confidence and self-esteem. Among the findings are that teen girls, especially girls of color, are significantly less likely than teen boys to describe themselves as confident, brave and heard.

The study also found that seeing female sci-fi and superhero characters has a greater effect on girls than when boys see male sci-fi and superhero characters.

 

“At this time of enormous, sweeping social change, it’s important that television and film provide an abundance of roles and role models for diverse girls and young women,” Julie Burton, president of the Women’s Media Center, said in a statement. “Our research found that female sci-fi and superhero characters help bridge the confidence gap for girls, making them feel strong, brave, confident, inspired, positive and motivated.”


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#32
caltrek

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The first female Doctor Who 

 

http://theweek.com/a...might-also-best

 

Introduction:

 

(The Week) Change is hard. Redecorating scares me. I go years without updating my iPhone. The new Gmail threw me into a tailspin. So naturally, I spend the first season of every regeneration in Doctor Who grouchily acclimating to the new face before reluctantly being won over by the finale.

 

That just makes it all the more surprising that following Jodie Whittaker's Sunday night debut, I was hooked within minutes. I have a feeling other fans felt the same — there is no doubt in my mind that she will be a great Doctor. In fact, she might just be the best in a generation.

 

Since Doctor Who began in the early 1960s, every incarnation of the Doctor has been a man. But seeing as the Doctor is a regenerating alien, there is no reason for this to be true; as the Twelfth Doctor (Peter Capaldi) tells his companion, Bill (Pearl Mackie), in a bit of foreshadowing in season 10, the Time Lords are "the most civilized civilization in the universe, we're billions of year beyond your petty human obsession with gender-associated stereotypes." Yet despite calls for a woman Doctor going back to the 1980s, Whittaker is the first. Ultimately Christopher Eccleston was cast as the Ninth Doctor for the series' revival in 2005, followed by David Tennant as the Tenth Doctor, Matt Smith as the Eleventh Doctor, and Capaldi as the Twelfth. When Whittaker was revealed as the Thirteenth Doctor in July 2017, the news was met overwhelmingly by excited and crying fans, although, as is the sad truth of fandoms when it comes to women, another group bemoaned the supposed "political correctness" of the choice.

 

But on Sunday, Whittaker proved herself not just to be right for the role, but possibly born for it. While every Doctor since Tennant has had their growing pains, needing to win over audiences after their beloved predecessor leaves the show, Whittaker was self-assured from the first moment she falls (literally) onto Earth in this polished new season, honoring her forerunners while also making the Doctor her own. As she tells her first enemy, the tooth-monster Tim Shaw, in what seems almost a direct address to her fans: "We can honor what we've been and choose who we want to be next."

 

 

screen_shot_2018-10-05_at_2.11.16_pm.png


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#33
PhoenixRu

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(Los Angeles Times) Most kids want to see more female superheroes and superheroes that look like them.

 

I'm long ago not a kid, but... IMHO, there are, on contrary, the unnatural excess of "heroic" female characters. Look at "Game of Thrones", for example: there was a lot of strong and complex male characters in early seasons, and now the whole thing was reduced to two main (good and evil) female protagonists plus bunch on insignificant male servants without own personalities or goals. Even the few survived "tough guys" from early seasons evolved into rugs under the feet of the Goddesses.



#34
Yuli Ban

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(Los Angeles Times) Most kids want to see more female superheroes and superheroes that look like them.

I'm long ago not a kid, but... IMHO, there are, on contrary, the unnatural excess of "heroic" female characters. Look at "Game of Thrones", for example: there was a lot of strong and comlex male characters in early seasons, and now the whole thing was reduced to two main (good and evil) female protagonists plus bunch on insignificant male servants without own personalities or goals. Even the few survived "tough guys" from early seasons evolved into rugs under the feet of the Goddesses.

You only think there is an unnatural excess of female heroes because there have never been as many as this before. If you actually look at the raw demographics, heroic female characters are still in the vast minority.

IIRC, it's a psychological phenomena where men and women alike think that women are more equal in a population than they actually are. I believe there was even a study done that proved that if a woman talks just 30% of the time, the men in the room will think she actually dominated the discussion. This can be scaled up. IIRC, even in movies where women had the lead role, they often had a tenth of the lines in the movie as a whole

 

It's like all those incels who whinge about the "forced diversity in video games" and that "every single game released in the past ten years has you playing as a woman".

diyxD9O.jpg

 

If that's what "diversity" and "unnatural excess" looks like, I'd hate to imagine what the "norm" is supposed to be.

 

 

IMO, the far bigger problem is that what few 'heroic female characters' there are generally are designed by people confused by gender roles, identity, and what 'subversion' is supposed to mean. 

One of the biggest sources of cringe I feel these days is when there's yet another unflappably badass heroine who is effortlessly better, stronger, faster, and more brutal than all the boys, but she's designed as some absolute sexpot who always wears skin-tight clothing and has few, if any muscles. She can take down larger foes with ballet-esque feats of strength and if any perv tries to hit on her, she'll hit on them— through the wall. And this is explained by "she is in charge of her sexuality."

 

BS.jpg

 

I didn't understand this until recently, and now I realize that it's because many creators are terrified of even one fictional female not being traditionally physically attractive in some way on top of the fact it seems the only way some are able to write 'strong' female characters is by making them physically strong. They grew up in a time when women were pigeonholed into one of five roles: "mother"; "innocence"; "seductress"; "queen"; and "old hag" while men were written with the complexity of galaxies. We basically still have these roles, but since "masculinity = competence", we've decided to cross those former five roles into "X, but strong and badass" and thought "they're as interesting as males now!"  Despite the fact they're basically men with boobs and vulvas in this case but without any real character complexity.

And the fundamental problem with that is that in order to make females coming from one of these five roots as competent as males, you have to make the males worse. All you get are worse characters all around.

 

And even though most Strong Female Characters™ are just "men with boobs and vulvas", they almost never look the part. As I said earlier, it's all ropy arms and flat-if-toned abs and high-cheekbones-but-no-deformities.

 

It's bad writing that's glossed over because it's currently considered 'progressive'. It seems like acknowledging femininity in any way is considered "sexist" or "misogynist" (as had happened in Avengers: Age of Ultron when Black Widow lamented that she couldn't have children and mulled if it was ironic that someone who could create life mainly takes it, and then progressive media tore the movie apart as being 'sexist').


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#35
Smithy299

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I watched Graham Norton Show with new Doctor Who. She impressed me.  :cool:


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