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Mexico Watch Thread

Mexico North America NAFTA Andrés Manuel López Obrador AMLO Donald Trump neoliberalism trade war economics immigration

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#41
Sciencerocks

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Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador Formalizes Bid for Presidency of Mexico

 

http://www.latimes.c...1211-story.html

 

Introduction:

 

(Los Angeles Times) One of Mexico’s most controversial and resilient political figures formalized his bid for the presidency Tuesday, vowing if elected to wean Mexico off U.S. agricultural imports, increase aid for students and the elderly and consider amnesty for drug war criminals.

 

The announcement by leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador was a surprise to no one. AMLO, as he is known to his hordes of supporters and detractors, has been running for president for well over a decade.

 

 

The mayor of Mexico City from 2000 to 2005, he narrowly lost to Felipe Calderon in the 2006 presidential race. Six years later, Lopez Obrador was defeated by Enrique Peña Nieto, who leaves office next year. Mexican presidents serve a single six-year term.

 

 

This time around, Lopez Obrador is leading in the polls, with a recent one showing him 12 percentage points ahead of his nearest rival. With Peña Nieto’s dismal approval ratings dragging down his ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, and voters anxious about rising homicide rates, high-profile corruption scandals and tense relations with the United States, Lopez Obrador and his supporters think the moment is right for his populist message.

 

 

…But as the lineup of his likely opponents has come into focus, it’s become clear that the 64-year-old with silvery hair has a long battle ahead of him.

 

 

 

Some of his platforms sound pretty good to me....Mexico would be wise to invest more in education, science and get away from the United states.


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#42
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Guadalupe Campanur, Environmental Activist, Found Dead

 

http://www.latimes.c...0123-story.html

 

Introduction:

 

Like many residents of the pine-covered hills of Cheran in central Mexico, Guadalupe Campanur led a life of radical resistance.

 

As a young woman in 2011, she joined town leaders in fighting back against illegal loggers and drug traffickers accused of murdering local farmers.

 

She later played a role when the town's newly formed self-defense patrols expelled the local government that was perceived as corrupt. They replaced police officers and politicians aligned with national parties with homegrown militias and assemblies inspired by the community's indigenous roots.

 

Fellow activists say Campanur, 32, was deeply committed to the town's unique political and social experiment, leading patrols of the militia as well as community sewing classes.

 

Last week, she was found strangled on the side of a highway.

BOVZVVVITJGGDFWE7T3UGYA5AM.jpg

Francisco Huaroco, left, head of a self-defense patrol in Cheran, Mexico, asks a resident if he has seen suspicious logging in the forests.

(Liliana Nieto del Rio / For The Times)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#43
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MEXICO REFUSES TO BE 'TREATED LIKE A DOORMAT' OVER TRUMP'S BORDER WALL, TOP ELECTION CANDIDATE DECLA
Source: Newsweek

BY JESSICA KWONG ON 2/19/18 AT 12:49 PM

 

Mexican presidential candidates from all sides have promised to take a tougher stance against U.S. President Donald Trump’s 'border wall' plans ahead of the July 1 election.

“Mexico will never again be treated like a doormat for the U.S., as it has been in this government,” Ricardo Anaya, who is backed by the center-right National Action Party (PAN) and the center-left Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD), said at a Mexico City event held by the parties, according to Reuters.

Anaya said Mexico will refuse to pay for constructing a wall between Mexico and the U.S., as Trump once insisted would be the case, and said he would be tougher on defending Mexico’s independence than the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI).

Though Anaya is gaining support among Mexican voters, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of the leftist Morena party holds a double-digit lead in recent polls. Lopez Obrador told hundreds of Morena backers that Trump’s border wall plan is unnecessary.

 

Read more: http://www.newsweek....11816?piano_t=1



#44
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After testy call with Trump over border wall, Mexico's president shelves plan to visit White House
Source: Washington Post

 

Tentative plans for Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto to make his first visit to the White House to meet with President Trump were scuttled this week after a testy call between the two leaders ended in an impasse over Trumps promised border wall, according to U.S. and Mexican officials.

Peña Nieto was eyeing an official trip to Washington this month or in early March, but called off the plan after Trump would not agree to publicly affirm Mexico's position that it would not fund construction of a border wall that the Mexican people widely consider offensive, said the officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a confidential conversation.

Speaking by phone on Feb. 20, Peña Nieto and Trump devoted a considerable portion of their roughly 50 minute conversation to the wall, and neither man would compromise his position.

One Mexican official said Trump lost his temper. But U.S. officials described him instead as being frustrated and exasperated, saying Trump believed it was unreasonable for Pea Nieto to expect him to back off his crowd-pleasing campaign promise of forcing Mexico to pay for the wall.

 

Read more: https://www.washingt...38eb_story.html



#45
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Mexico's Foreign Minister Cites 'Facts' After Trump Slams Mexico Over Migration

 

https://www.npr.org/...-over-migration

 

Introduction:

 

(NPR) Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray Caso is rejecting claims that his country allows "caravans" of migrants to pass into the U.S. — something President Trump accused Mexico of doing in a tweet this weekend. Defending Mexico, Videgaray added, "Facts clearly reflect this."

 

Videgaray's response came hours after Trump pointedly criticized Mexico on Sunday morning. The U.S. president devoted a series of tweets warning of "caravans" of people heading to the U.S. and he threatened to hurt Mexico economically and to build a wall along the border.

 

In referring to "caravans," the president seemed to be citing an annual campaign by Pueblo Sin Fronteras ("people without borders"), which organizes hundreds of people into a well-publicized cross-country trip to seek sanctuary and attract attention to the struggles for rights and against poverty in Central America.

 

Trump's tweets implied that the caravan was an escalation in an immigration crisis, saying that Mexico was "doing very little, if not NOTHING" to stop people from passing through its borders and into the U.S., and adding a threat of punishment: "They must stop the big drug and people flows, or I will stop their cash cow, NAFTA. NEED WALL!"

 

In his own tweet, Videgaray said: "Every day Mexico and the U.S. work together on migration throughout the region. Facts clearly reflect this. An inaccurate news report should not serve to question this strong cooperation. Upholding human dignity and rights is not at odds with the rule of law. Happy Easter."

rtx4nzmn_wide-85b155ba440be0b73704920142

Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray during a news conference in Mexico City in February that included then-U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.

Henry Romero/Reuters


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#46
Yuli Ban

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Getting a lot of Donald Trump vibes from this guy.
 

Mexico leftist opens up 22-point lead in presidency race

Mexican leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has widened his lead in the race to win the July 1 presidential election, opening up a gap of 22 percentage points, a poll by newspaper Reforma showed on Wednesday.
The April 12-15 voter poll showed Lopez Obrador winning 48 percent, a jump of six points from a February survey by Reforma. His nearest rival, Ricardo Anaya, who heads a right-left coalition, dropped by six points to 26 percent.
 
Running third was Jose Antonio Meade, candidate of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), whose backing remained steady at 18 percent, the poll showed.

The guy's pretty strange. Economically and politically, he's pretty far to the left. Like, if he were running in the USA, the Democrats wouldn't accept him. They barely accept Bernie, who is a bog standard progressive by European standards. One popular thing in Democrat circles is to post the emoji for donuts which represents opposition to socialism/democratic socialism/social democracy. The pinkest forms of socialism, the Democrats oppose (which makes the epithets of them being called socialists by the Right so much more hilarious).

Obrador is more Chavez. An actual socialist, populist, and statist. 

But strangely enough, he's got rightist social attitudes.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#47
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Andrés Manuel López Obrador Is No Hugo Chávez

Some see Andrés Manuel López Obrador as the Mexican Hugo Chávez — a dangerous radical who would threaten the country’s political and economic stability. Others see the controversial leftist as the only hope left for a nation marred by corruption, poverty, and drug violence. Now, after five years of drift and a seemingly endless series of corruption scandals under President Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, polls suggest that the 2018 presidential race will offer the two-time runner-up his best chance yet to lead his country. Last week, a poll by the newspaper El Universal showed an early lead of nearly 11 percent ahead of the July election.
López Obrador, who officially launched his campaign with a speech in Ciudad Juárez earlier this month, is running against José Antonio Meade of the incumbent Institutional Revolutionary Party, a Yale-educated lawyer and economist, and rising star Ricardo Anaya Cortés of the centrist Forward for Mexico alliance, which includes the center-right National Action Party and center-left Party of the Democratic Revolution. Either of the above would likely represent continuity with Mexico’s fiscally responsible, internationalist agenda of the past 30 years. Yet they would also surely disappoint: Mexico’s greatest challenges — inequality, education, rule of law — cannot be resolved within a single six-year term, only through steady progress.
For U.S.-born, Mexico City-based academic John Ackerman, a prominent leftist commentator in Mexico, López Obrador is a “progressive reformist” in the mold of former Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, while the political right portrays him as a populist who would lead Mexico down the same path as Venezuela. The most astute criticism of López Obrador, however, often comes from the very leftists he claims to represent, who lament a burgeoning cult of personality; a regressive attitude on social issues, such as abortion and LGBT rights; and a longing for the all-powerful presidency and statism of Mexico’s past.


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#48
Alislaws

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But strangely enough, he's got rightist social attitudes.

 

That's like the worst of both worlds. All power to the state but also the state gets to decide who you can sleep with. 



#49
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Mexican leftist widens lead in presidential race: poll

Mexican leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has maintained his lead in the race to win the presidency with less than two months remaining before the country’s July 1 election, an opinion poll showed on Monday.
The survey of 1,200 voters by polling firm BGC showed Lopez Obrador winning 42 percent support, up by two percentage points from a previous poll by the company published on April 20.
 
His closest rival Ricardo Anaya, who heads a right-left coalition, advanced one percentage point to 33 percent support, while Jose Antonio Meade, candidate of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), slipped three points to 19 percent.
 
The BGC poll, carried out between May 3-6, contrasted with recent surveys that showed Lopez Obrador’s advantage over Anaya narrowing somewhat at the end of April.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#50
Yuli Ban

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Mexico front-runner wants to debate legalizing drugs

The leftist front-runner for Mexico's presidential election said Tuesday the country should debate legalizing drugs as a way to staunch violent crime that has claimed tens of thousands of lives.
Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, a fiery former Mexico City mayor, made the proposal at a "dialogue on peace and justice" that was also attended by his main rivals, conservative Ricardo Anaya and ruling party candidate Jose Antonio Meade.
Security has emerged as perhaps the biggest issue in the July 1 election, after Mexico registered a record 25,000 murders last year.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#51
Yuli Ban

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Mexican presidential frontrunner spells tension for U.S.–Mexico ties

Mexico elects its next president on July 1, and if present polls hold, the populist Andrés Manuel López Obrador — the former leftist mayor of Mexico City and twice-defeated presidential candidate known as “AMLO” — will prevail.
Why it matters: AMLO’s is a decidedly "Mexico First" agenda. AMLO, if he is elected, and Trump would be natural antagonists, but enablers as well, as each would fit the other’s vision of the bilateral relationship.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#52
Yuli Ban

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Mexico's central bank keeps interest rate unchanged

Mexico’s central bank held its key lending rate unchanged for the second consecutive meeting, as expected, leaving it at a 9-year high of 7.5 per cent as inflation continued to cool. The bank said Thursday’s decision was unanimous. Looking ahead, it said it would maintain a “prudent monetary policy” and keep a close eye on economic variables, notably the impact of the peso on inflation and on Mexico’s monetary position vis-à-vis the US. The central bank said it stood read to act “opportunely and firmly” to keep inflation on track towards the bank’s 3 per cent goal.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#53
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Mexican journalist Juan Carlos Huerta executed by gunmen

Juan Carlos Huerta, a news radio host in the southern Mexican state of Tabasco, was gunned down in his car by armed men on Tuesday as he drove from his home, Mexican authorities said.
Fernando Valenzuela, the chief prosecutor of Tabasco, said the gunmen ran into Huerta's car with another vehicle as he left his home in the state's capital of Villahermosa, forcing him to stop. A man got out and shot Huerta before fleeing.
Two .45-caliber shell casings were found at the scene. Officials said the perpetrators escaped and roads leaving the capital had been closed off as part of attempts to catch them.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#54
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Mexico front-runner's lead widens a month before vote

Mexican presidential front-runner Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has extended his lead well beyond his nearest rivals with just a month to go before the July 1 election, an opinion poll showed on Thursday.
The survey by polling firm Parametria showed support for the leftist former mayor of Mexico City at 45 percent, an increase of six percentage points from a prior April poll. That gave Lopez Obrador more backing than his nearest two rivals combined.
Lopez Obrador, 64, was runner-up in the previous two elections, with fears that he could destabilize the economy contributing to his defeat. This time frustration over corruption, rising violence and tepid growth have all helped lift his bid.
 
Lopez Obrador's closest competitor is Ricardo Anaya, a former chairman of the center-right National Action Party (PAN), who is fronting a right-left coalition of parties.


Obrador's polling at 54%. His closest competitor, Anaya, is polling at 24%. The third place candidate, Meade, is polling at 17%. Two others are polling collectively at 5%. Obrador is so stupefyingly far ahead of everyone else that he is literally polling ahead of every other candidate combined.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#55
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Mexican leftist widens double-digit lead for presidency

Leftist candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador extended his double-digit opinion poll lead to claim half of voter support ahead of Mexico’s July 1 presidential election, a voter survey showed on Monday.
Lopez Obrador, who has consistently ranked in the lead in major polls, has 50 percent of voter support, 26 percentage points ahead of his nearest rival, according to the poll published in newspaper El Financiero. Right-left coalition leader Ricardo Anaya followed in second place, dropping 2 percentage points to take 24 percent of voter support, Monday’s poll showed.
 
The PRI’s Jose Antonio Meade, a former finance minister, remained in third place but increased two percentage points to 22 percent.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#56
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This Mexican candidate had just vowed to tackle crime. Then a gunman shot him dead.

 

The Mexican congressional candidate had just left a debate hall where he addressed public security in his northern state. He walks over to a person holding a phone and poses for a picture. In a matter of seconds, a man walks up from behind and shoots him in the head, killing him before walking off.
The death Friday night of Coahuila state's Fernando Puron brought to 112 the number of candidates or politicians killed since the launch of Mexico's electoral campaign in September, according to the consulting group Etellekt. Puron was the first candidate running on the federal level to be killed.

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#57
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Mexico Works to Become 'Country of Refuge' As U.S. Cracks Down on Immigrants

 

https://www.alternet...down-immigrants

 

Introduction:

 

(Alternet) Mexico is often considered a transit country for migrants. It’s the territory Central Americans must cross to get to the United States.

 

But many generations of migrants have made Mexico their home. From 1930s-era Spanish Civil War exiles and Jewish WWII refugees to South Americans escaping military dictatorships throughout the 20th century, Mexico has welcomed successive waves of immigrants.

 

In 1948, during the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights – the founding document of the international human rights system – Mexican delegate Pablo Campos Ortiz advocated for a “very broad conception” of asylum. Seconding a Lebanese proposal, Campos Ortiz said the world should recognize “not only the right of seeking asylum but also the right to be granted asylum.”

 

Mexico and Lebanon lost that debate.

 

The 1951 Convention for Refugees and subsequent agreements require that signatory countries offer asylum to migrants who can prove they have a “credible fear” of certain kinds of persecution. As demonstrated by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ recent exclusion of domestic abuse as grounds for asylum, they are not obliged to accept all applications.

 

screen_shot_2018-06-15_at_10.23.22_am.pn

 

Photo Credit: MSNBC


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#58
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This Mexican candidate had just vowed to tackle crime. Then a gunman shot him dead.

 

 

 

The Mexican congressional candidate had just left a debate hall where he addressed public security in his northern state. He walks over to a person holding a phone and poses for a picture. In a matter of seconds, a man walks up from behind and shoots him in the head, killing him before walking off.
The death Friday night of Coahuila state's Fernando Puron brought to 112 the number of candidates or politicians killed since the launch of Mexico's electoral campaign in September, according to the consulting group Etellekt. Puron was the first candidate running on the federal level to be killed.

 

Unfortunately, that is the choice many Mexican politicians face.  Oppose criminal conduct and risk being shot down, or support criminal conduct and risk being shot down.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#59
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A New Revolution in Mexico

Sick of corruption and of Trump, voters embrace the maverick leftist Andrés Manuel López Obrador

The first time that Andrés Manuel López Obrador ran for President of Mexico, in 2006, he inspired such devotion among his partisans that they sometimes stuck notes in his pockets, inscribed with their hopes for their families. In an age defined by globalism, he was an advocate of the working class—and also a critic of the pri, the party that has ruthlessly dominated national politics for much of the past century. In the election, his voters’ fervor was evidently not enough; he lost, by a tiny margin. The second time he ran, in 2012, the enthusiasm was the same, and so was the outcome. Now, though, Mexico is in crisis—beset from inside by corruption and drug violence, and from outside by the antagonism of the Trump Administration. There are new Presidential elections on July 1st, and López Obrador is running on a promise to remake Mexico in the spirit of its founding revolutionaries. If the polls can be believed, he is almost certain to win.
In March, he held a meeting with hundreds of loyalists, at a conference hall in Culiacán. López Obrador, known across Mexico as amlo, is a rangy man of sixty-four, with a youthful, clean-shaven face, a mop of silver hair, and an easy gait. When he entered, his supporters got to their feet and chanted, “It’s an honor to vote for López Obrador!” Many of them were farmworkers, wearing straw hats and scuffed boots. He urged them to install Party observers at polling stations to prevent fraud, but cautioned against buying votes, a long-established habit of the pri. “That’s what we’re getting rid of,” he said. He promised a “sober, austere government—a government without privilege.” López Obrador frequently uses “privilege” as a term of disparagement, along with “élite,” and, especially, “power mafia,” as he describes his enemies in the political and business communities. “We are going to lower the salaries of those who are on top to increase the salaries of those on the bottom,” he said, and added a Biblical assurance: “Everything I am saying will be done.” López Obrador spoke in a warm voice, leaving long pauses and using simple phrases that ordinary people would understand. He has a penchant for rhymes and repeated slogans, and at times the crowd joined in, like fans at a pop concert. When he said, “We don’t want to help the power mafia to . . . ,” a man in the audience finished his sentence: “keep stealing.” Working together, López Obrador said, “we are going to make history.”
The current Mexican government is led by the center-right President Enrique Peña Nieto. His party, the pri, has depicted López Obrador as a radical populist, in the tradition of Hugo Chávez, and warned that he intends to turn Mexico into another Venezuela. The Trump Administration has been similarly concerned. Roberta Jacobson, who until last month was the U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, told me that senior American officials often expressed worry: “They catastrophized about amlo, saying things like ‘If he wins, the worst will happen.’ ”
Ironically, his surging popularity can be attributed partly to Donald Trump. Within days of Trump’s election, Mexican political analysts were predicting that his open belligerence toward Mexico would encourage political resistance. Mentor Tijerina, a prominent pollster in Monterrey, told me at the time, “Trump’s arrival signifies a crisis for Mexico, and this will help amlo.” Not long after the Inauguration, López Obrador published a best-selling book called “Oye, Trump” (“Listen Up, Trump”), which contained tough-talking snippets from his speeches. In one, he declared, “Trump and his advisers speak of the Mexicans the way Hitler and the Nazis referred to the Jews, just before undertaking the infamous persecution and the abominable extermination.”
Officials in the Peña Nieto government warned their counterparts in the White House that Trump’s offensive behavior heightened the prospect of a hostile new government—a national-security threat just across the border. If Trump didn’t modulate his behavior, the election would be a referendum on which candidate was the most anti-American. In the U.S., the warnings worked. During a Senate hearing in April, 2017, John McCain said, “If the election were tomorrow in Mexico, you would probably get a left-wing, anti-American President.” John Kelly, who was then the Homeland Security chief, agreed. “It would not be good for America—or for Mexico,” he said.
In Mexico, remarks like Kelly’s seemed only to improve López Obrador’s standing. “Every time an American politician opens their mouth to express a negative view about a Mexican candidate, it helps him,” Jacobson said.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#60
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Get Ready for a Mexican Left Turn on Foreign Policy

Mexican foreign policy over the last two decades has been increasingly open and engaged with the region and the world. But if Mexicans pick Andrés Manuel López Obrador, popularly known as AMLO, as their next president in less than two weeks, as the polls seem to indicate they will, then the country’s foreign policy could take a sharp turn to the left — and relations with the United States could fall into new depths.

Coincidentally, this is the perfect opportunity for China to make a move into Mexico.


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Mexico, North America, NAFTA, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, AMLO, Donald Trump, neoliberalism, trade war, economics, immigration

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