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#661
Erowind

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About personality cult:
 
Driven by curiosity, I've recentlty downloaded the archive of "Izvestia" (the main oficious Soviet newspaper) of the year 1937. I was wondering how they were depicting the comrade Stalin, the breaking news about political repression and the like. And you know what? Stalin's portraits are quite rare while "some flaws and remnants of the past in our life" described rather frankly and accurately...
 
Let's go back to our days. "Izvestia" is still alive and well and remains what it was in past: the main oficious newspaper. But, compared to Stalin's era, in the modern newspaper Putin's picture(s) appears in every (I mean literally every) issue: Putin at workplace, Putin awards common or not so common people, Putin and minister(s), Putin and foreign leader(s), Putin talking to workers, Putin inspecting robots... That's what I've found in the last twelve issues:
 
PutinPutinPutinPutinPutin.jpg
 
v v v
 
26929828.jpg


I'd be curious to see Stalin's Izvestia coverage in the late 40s and early 50s compared to Putin.

#662
PhoenixRu

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I'd be curious to see Stalin's Izvestia coverage in the late 40s and early 50s compared to Putin.

 

Technically speaking, you can download the whole 1917-1982 archive here. But its size is truly monstrous: 553 GB.



#663
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I'd be curious to see Stalin's Izvestia coverage in the late 40s and early 50s compared to Putin.

 
Technically speaking, you can download the whole 1917-1982 archive here. But its size is truly monstrous: 553 GB.

Lord, I'll sift around a bit when I get home. Thanks for the link :)

#664
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Gore sites have this narrative where they're trying to show the truth of reality or whatever, but quickly you realize they're edgelords with a great alt-right bend. It would make sense if the gore was focused on political and social events with a level of journalistic integrity, like with the horrors of war, vigilantism, and gang violence-- but they just post it without context and only for the gore itself beside useless shit like car accidents and medical conditions. And when it does get political, the comments are what you'd expect. It's very obvious they're edgy manchildren. I guess that's the thing gore attracts at the end of the day. Not people who understand what reality is, but the immature ones who become obsessed with the violent "other-world" so far separated from their banal lives.

 

For example, here we see the community of bestgore at work:

 

kUYyp0R.png


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#665
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I'm watching the Chernobyl show, the hype is a lie. The show is clichéd to hell and only rides on the plot points of the actual disaster.

Outlook's secret song of the ~week: https://youtu.be/DGe_Sluth3A


#666
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I'm watching the Chernobyl show, the hype is a lie. The show is clichéd to hell and only rides on the plot points of the actual disaster.

 

I have enjoyed the first couple of episodes. I've been listening to the creator of the show on the accompanying podcast. A lot of the outlandish and seemingly clichéd stuff actually happened and he almost changed certain things because of that. As for riding on the plot points - isn't that the point of a docu-drama? The characters are there to dramatise and humanise actual events, the events themselves take center stage.



#667
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I've been listening to the creator of the show on the accompanying podcast. A lot of the outlandish and seemingly clichéd stuff actually happened and he almost changed certain things because of that. 

 

There was clearly a whole virtuous good scientists vs nasty corrupt politicians trope going on that wasn't reflective of what happened. The Ulana Khomyuk character as the Einstein Sue caused many eye-rolls for me. I don't understand how people can watch that and not think that the creator's are really pushing an ideological narrative here that was not characteristic of the disaster, while using disaster film tropes to hammer the nail into your skull. I can understand if they do it subtly or smoothly, but it got to the point that it was almost satire. Like the Vladimir I Lenin scene. It was such obvious lowest common denominator bullshit with no real depth that I was left questioning general taste. I could be wrong though, I haven't finished the series yet. Maybe it's just the first few episodes.

 

 

As for riding on the plot points - isn't that the point of a docu-drama? 

 

Not if the drama part is bad. It's usually supposed to compliment the event, not rely on or detract from the event, otherwise people would just watch a documentary.

 

EDIT: And I just want to say that it isn't bad itself. Some of the drama is done really well, and I did enjoy watching it. But it does not live up to the hype at all for me. Especially the ratings, like how in god's name is Chernobyl 97% on RT.


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#668
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I think I agree with the Ulana Khomyuk character, she was invented and it didn't seem necessary - he talks about having a female in this role (as well as playing many of the doctors) as actually women were quite well represented in medicine and research in the Soviet Union, whereas they were absent from the political domain.

 

You might be right about the Vladimir I Lenin scene, but from what the creator said, it was a little bit like that in some aspects. He wanted that character to show that there were still some very loyalist older people who still remembered the revolution. He also mentions how one of the Chernobyl survivors mentioned how they weren't saying "comrade" enough, which they were reluctant to put in as it seems cliché to us. I do think they go overboard with trying to make the officials seem a bit evil though - we don't need antagonists, there is enough going on with the plot. 

 

I guess I am just enjoying it as I didn't quite realise just how crazy some of the denial and decisions were at the time. Like Dyatlov's denial, not turning off the three other reactors, people very ignorant of the threat of radiation, a fireman picking up a bit of graphite from the reactor core, Chernobyl shutting off the phone lines etc. - is all close to reality. 

 

It's also crazy how so many were willing to basically sacrifice themselves to prevent the disaster from being much worse. It does seem that if this were to happen in Europe or North America - it could have been much worse. I don't think individuals here would be so willing to sacrifice in such a way compared to the soviets at the time. 


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#669
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I didn't get the sense it was overdone or cliched. I hope this isn't coming from this type of reasoning: "This is obviously imperial / corporate / U.S / whatever propaganda. Let me look a little closer and see if I can spot the flaws..."

A friend of mine from India told me a story once, about his time in grade school. He came from a communist intellectual family (there are a lot of communists in India), and was very precocious. Anyways, one day he was asked to read George Orwell's "Animal Farm" for class and discuss it. Apparently, during class he had a fit and called it "propaganda!", and got angry with the teacher for not seeing the obvious anti-communist themes. The teacher was taken aback. I think the story finished with my friend having to be sent home or something -- he just couldn't just let it go that he was made to be respectful about blatant anti-communist propaganda.

May be true that Animal Farm was propaganda -- but it was still a fun little story; and has some truth, as does 1984, which is fast becoming reality in China.
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#670
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Nah, I had the same gripe with the Martian. I couldn't understand the hype and the appeal. It felt so unrealistic and shallow and cliched for a film that was lauded on its scientific realism. Same thing here, some of it felt unrealistic and shallow and clichéd.

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#671
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I got a desktop computer, finally. Issue is that there's no VGA port for the graphics card, so we gotta get an adaptor. After that, I can finally start the path towards my life's purpose. Once I have solved the mysteries of the mind, through the rigorous studies of philosophy, neuroscience, logic, computer science, mathematics, linguistics-- and apply that knowledge through thousands of hours worth of practice and skill, to get to a point of transcendent wisdom that not even the Socratics could dream of; then and only then, I will create the first real 2d waifu.
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#672
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I didn't get the sense it was overdone or cliched. I hope this isn't coming from this type of reasoning: "This is obviously imperial / corporate / U.S / whatever propaganda. Let me look a little closer and see if I can spot the flaws..."A friend of mine from India told me a story once, about his time in grade school. He came from a communist intellectual family (there are a lot of communists in India), and was very precocious. Anyways, one day he was asked to read George Orwell's "Animal Farm" for class and discuss it. Apparently, during class he had a fit and called it "propaganda!", and got angry with the teacher for not seeing the obvious anti-communist themes. The teacher was taken aback. I think the story finished with my friend having to be sent home or something -- he just couldn't just let it go that he was made to be respectful about blatant anti-communist propaganda.May be true that Animal Farm was propaganda -- but it was still a fun little story; and has some truth, as does 1984, which is fast becoming reality in China.


The irony of the story is that Orwell was a socialist and some of his literature was written as a critique of marxism-leninism after fighting in the Spanish Civil War. I'm not sure I'd call his works propaganda in the same way I'm not sure I'd call Atlas Shrugged propaganda.

#673
PhoenixRu

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The show is clichéd to hell...

 

That's why I almost never watch/read any Western Russia-related stuff.

 

We have the special "cranberry" term and the big part of what foreigners ever said/wrote about Russia was said/written exactly in this genre. All these dark industrial ruines under always gray skies, these brutal muscular gap-toothed guys in blue-white navy wests, senselessly cruel officers easily killing their own soldiers, vodka, laziness, apathy, outbursts of cruelty... Sometimes this is intentional propaganda, and sometimes just a black cliches (formed by propaganda): "if we'll show the usual people, how will the viewer understand that things are happening in Russia?"

 

So, guys, enjoy your show yourself, I'm not going to join...



#674
PhoenixRu

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I didn't get the sense it was overdone or cliched.

 

But, seriously, how can you judge? Just because it fits your own stereotypes about Russia? If so, ask yourself: where these stereotypes came from?

 

I, for example, completely unable to distinguish the "cliched" and "truthful" movies about US everyday life. I never lived there, I don't know how people communicate, what's perceived normal and what's not, I don't know the thousands of unwritten laws, habits, taboos... and so on and so forth.



#675
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I'm going through a stage in life that I'll be looking back on in my old age with a new perspective. I imagined myself old, surrounded by friends and family on my deathbed, and thought to myself how I'd see the situation and I was thinking on reflection, missing the things that I once had like an astronomy book by Sir Patrick Moore, and I became aware of the way I'd see myself. In that situation, I'll look at myself within life's contexts. I've grown old, I've reached the end of life and now I look at what I leave behind. I'd have judgements on my chilfren, and family I've had. Perhapd loved ones and friends that have already died, as well as the afterlife. Then I thought about my past, and sort of saw my youth right now in the perspective of one whose dying of old age. I don't know how to describe it as much as looking back at an early part of a film you've completed, except that film is your life. Then I realized I was living that part right now.

It was a really weird feeling, and gave me a perspective of what my actions are right now to me later on in life, if I don't die prematurely of course.
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#676
PhoenixRu

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I've grown old, I've reached the end of life and now I look at what I leave behind. I'd have judgements on my chilfren, and family I've had. Perhapd loved ones and friends that have already died, as well as the afterlife.

 

Maybe unrelated, but this part reminded me the article of some Orthodox priest. I've long forgot his name, but nevertheless... Being asked the classical question "why loving God sends sinners to hell" priest said something like this:

 

Not at all, God will not torment you, there will be no any fire or sulphur. Nobody really knows what awaits us in afterlife. I can only guess and here is my guess: after your death, God will free your soul from all the dirt that you have accumulated in your earthly life and then will show you, in greatest details, the alternative life (lives?) you could live: the friends you could have, the love you could experience, the great (or humble, but still very important) things you could achieve... He will show you the turning points of your life when you could be brave, but turned out to be a coward, when you could show humanity, but were indifferent... you will see all the missed opportunities and their consequences... And the very contrast between what you really were and what you could become - THIS will be your worst punishment.


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#677
PhoenixRu

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Small update:

 

...some Orthodox priest. I've long forgot his name...

 

Google search didn't help, but (as it seems) I've found the source of idea. Basil of Caesarea (theologian of IV century) wrote that eternal life will be given to sinners as well, so that they will be able "to see in themselves the abomination of those sins that were made, for the cruelest of all torments is eternal shame."



#678
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Anybody here using duckduckgo instead of google now? It's just as quick as google and the search results are pretty indistinguishable. Biggest bonus is you can get direct image links on its image search. Also less creepy.

 

 

Small update:

 

...some Orthodox priest. I've long forgot his name...

 

Google search didn't help, but (as it seems) I've found the source of idea. Basil of Caesarea (theologian of IV century) wrote that eternal life will be given to sinners as well, so that they will be able "to see in themselves the abomination of those sins that were made, for the cruelest of all torments is eternal shame."

 

I've always enjoyed reading the old theologians. They're much greater thinkers than we think of them nowadays.


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#679
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I just realized for the amount of coffee I drink, I pretty much consume more than a glass of milk everyday. It's probably the reason for my incredibly thick skull.

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#680
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I now have Netflix.


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