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2018 Russian Presidential elections

Presidential elections 2018 Russia Ksenia Sobchak Vladimir Putin

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23 replies to this topic

#21
caltrek

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Opposition candidate votes in Russian presidential election and urges other Putin critics to do likewise

 

http://Oppostion can... to do likewise

 

Introduction:

 

(Los Angeles Times) Opposition candidate Ksenia Sobchak cast her ballot Sunday in Russia's presidential election and urged Vladimir Putin's critics to vote instead of boycotting.

 

Sobchak, 36, a former TV star, told reporters in Moscow that the higher the support for Putin, "the tougher the system" Russians will face in his new term.

 

Sobchak argued against the boycott called for by opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who is barred from running. She said "every extra percentage point" for Putin is a result of those who refuse or don't bother to vote.

 

Sobchak called on Putin's critics to "come together."

 

Critics think Sobchak has the tacit support of the Kremlin so that the election looks more democratic, which she denies. She is the only candidate who has openly criticized Putin in the campaign.

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Opposition presidential candidate Ksenia Sobchak leaves a voting booth at a Moscow polling station on March 18.

(Maxim Shipenkov / EPA / Shutterstock)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#22
Sciencerocks

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McCain on Putin election victory: Russians know 'his claim to power is a sham'
Source: The HILL

    Link to tweet.

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) on Sunday blasted Russian President Vladimir Putin's reelection as "a sham."

"That #Putin had to work so hard to drive voter turnout shows the Russian people know his claim to power is a sham," McCain tweeted shortly after exit polls showed Putin won a fourth term.

"The US stands with all Russians yearning for freedom," he added.

 

Read more: http://thehill.com/h...impression=true



#23
Sciencerocks

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McCain rips Trump's congratulatory call to Putin as an insult to Russian people
Source: The Hill

 


BY MAX GREENWOOD - 03/20/18 01:29 PM EDT

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) blasted President Trump on Tuesday over news that Trump phoned Russian President Vladimir Putin to congratulate him on his recent electoral win.

-snip-

In a statement, McCain called Trump's phone call to Putin an insult to "every Russian citizen who was denied the right to vote in a free and fair election to determine their country's future."

“An American president does not lead the Free World by congratulating dictators on winning sham elections," McCain said.

"And by doing so with Vladimir Putin, President Trump insulted every Russian citizen who was denied the right to vote in a free and fair election to determine their country's future, including the countless Russian patriots who have risked so much to protest and resist Putin's regime."

 

 

Read more: http://thehill.com/h...-russian-people

 

This is why I don't regret my vote for this honorable man. Fuck Trump and his treasonous ass...



#24
caltrek

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One more term for Putin: Dark ambition, dim hopes

 

http://​http://www.w...ition-dim-hopes

 

I would characterize the Brookings Institute as U.S. based and center left in its orientation.  

 

 

(Brookings Institute) Vladimir Putin’s victory is not a surprise, given his reign over the past 18 years during which he eroded state institutions and undercut Russia’s democratic pillars. Since the Russian president cannot promise economic prosperity, he instead distracts citizens and inflates his strongman image through political confrontation with the West.

 

As I predicted in an op-ed late last month, the outcome of the Russian presidential elections was a forgone conclusion—Vladimir Putin retains his post in the Kremlin for another six years. Elections were not fair and were not equal. Putin’s main opponent, opposition leader Alexei Navalny, was not registered as a candidate; seven other candidates never demonstrated a strong desire to win—their combined result is less than one-third of Putin’s. None of the candidates had even half of Putin’s TV airtime and all were financially constrained.

 

Putin’s result was supported by massive voter fraud. Observers registered hundreds of falsifications, with flagrant ballot stuffing by officials despite online web monitoring. Election results in local voting stations differed depending on the presence or non-presence of observers. For example, in Chechnya, the North Caucasian ethnic republic run by the former rebel leader Ramzan Kadyrov, those stations with observers reported turnout of between 30-40 percent and Putin’s result was from 60 to 70 percent, while at the voting stations with no observers the turnout reached 100 percent with 93 to 95 percent voting for Putin.  According to mathematical analysis from the elections on Sunday, March 18, Putin obtained 9.5 million extra votes. This compares with 8.8 million extra votes in the 2004 elections, and more than 10 million extra votes in 2012.

 

The desire to hold on to power is a natural one for many politicians. Some employ democratic methods to win elections, and some wait for the right moment to change the rules of the game, drawing their country farther and farther away from political equality. Putin chose the second path. Political transformation in Russia under Putin moved in a consistent direction. Each time he faced a decision on political reforms, he chose the path of greater restriction of freedom. He has never agreed to concessions, opting instead to go on the attack and increase pressure on his opponents.

 

 

Well, now that you have read the introduction I guess you should consider yourself brainwashed.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Presidential elections, 2018, Russia, Ksenia Sobchak, Vladimir Putin

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