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The Future of Food

Food CRISPR GMO Gene Modification Agriculture

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#1
caltrek

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Amazing to me that we have either not created a thread on this topic, or that it has long since disappeared from the early pages. At any rate, here is my first submission:

 

 

The “Gene Silenced” Apple Is Coming.

 

http://www.motherjon...pple-is-coming/

 

Introduction:

 

(Mother Jones) The Arctic Golden apple, the first genetically modified apple available to consumers, is making its way to grocery store shelves. I’m an apple loyalist—I pack one as an after-lunch snack nearly every day of the week. So I jumped at the chance to sample this new version of the fruit at a fall event hosted by the environmental technology think tank the Breakthrough Institute in San Francisco. The apple was crisp and mildly sweet, and pretty much tasted to me like any normal Golden Delicious apple. But there was one difference: When I let a slice sit on my plate for half an hour, it never turned brown.

 

The apple is the handiwork of Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc., a company based in Canada with orchards in Washington. Since receiving approval from the US Department of Agriculture in 2015, the company has been finessing several genetically engineered apples: The Arctic Golden has arrived at select grocery stores around the Midwest (though Okanagan wouldn’t specify which stores), and the Arctic Granny and the Arctic Fuji are in the works.

 

Okanagan achieves this non-browning effect through a process called gene silencing. After creating apple genes that produce less polyphenol oxidase (PPO), the enzyme that causes browning, scientists grow small plantlets in a lab until they can be micro-grafted to apple trees and planted in an orchard. The resulting fruit has flesh that doesn’t turn a muddy color when exposed to oxygen.

 

The Arctic’s non-browning properties mean it can be sold pre-sliced, which the company says makes it more appealing as a snack food for kids.

Why go through all this trouble to change the color of the fruit? The Arctic’s non-browning properties mean it can be sold pre-sliced, which the company says makes it more appealing as a snack food for kids. And unlike other prepackaged apple slices, “our non-browning sliced apples are preservative free, avoiding negative flavor and aroma impacts of anti-browning treatments,” Okanagan President Neal Carter told me

original-conventional-vs-arctic.jpeg?w=9

A conventional apple vs. the Arctic Apple on the right.

Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#2
caltrek

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This (see below) first appeared in the AI & Robotics thread, but clearly is also appropriate for this thread.

 

A Semi-Autonomous Cricket Farm to Feed the World

 

http://blogs.discove...arm-autonomous/

 

Extract:

Quote

 

(Discover) Pound for pound, crickets, and edible insects in general, offer the most bang for the planet’s resources. Crickets require just 1.5 pounds of feed for every pound of edible cricket product made. This ratio, known as the feed conversion rate, is far less impressive for other popular protein sources: 20 pounds of feed for every pound of beef, 4.5 pounds for every pound of chicken and 7.3 pounds for every pound of pork.

 

…Data-driven approaches will help Aspire (Food Group) discover an ideal cricket rearing process, but to put those best practices to use consistently, automatically and at massive scale, they’re leaning on custom-built robotics. Aspire engineers, for example, designed feeder robots that patrol the aisles of cricket bins, adding just the right amount of food and water to each bin based on a well-honed formula improved upon by billions of cricket forebears.

 

 

“Automated approaches help you scale exponentially, whereas manual labor is more linear,” says (Mohammed) Ashour. “We also use a live box system, and you want to reduce the amount of contact between people and livestock so you don’t stress the crickets.”

 

 

Over the next year or so, Ashour expects 70 to 80 percent of the cricket rearing process will be automated, with highly skilled workers providing the rest. He’s quick to add that the robots will do the grunt work, but the future of insect farming will always be a hybrid approach that relies on human expertise.

 

 

“Automation can replace low-skill labor, but we are creating new discipline of jobs that haven’t existed before,” he says. “For many entomology grads, they find themselves working for pest companies where their job is to raise insects and learn how to kill them. We’re creating a discipline in entomology for scientists to use their love of insects, not to fight pests, but as a food source that we need to optimize.”

 

aspire-foods1-1024x683.jpg

A feeding bot rolls through the racks of crickets at Aspire Food Group’s test farm in Austin, Texas. 

(Credit: Aspire Food Group)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#3
caltrek

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So, the way I figure it is you can either learn not to waste food, or you can learn to love eating crickets.

 

 

Denver Nonprofit Food Recovery System Cuts Food Waste

 

https://nonprofitqua...uts-food-waste/

 

Introduction:

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) “A 2017 report by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) says Americans throw out 400 pounds of food per person per year,” notes Kevin Beaty in Denverite—an amount, Beaty adds, equal to roughly 40 percent of all available food in the country. This throwing away of food takes place even though an estimated 41.2 million Americans are, according to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), food insecure, which the USDA defines as being uncertain of having, or unable to acquire, enough food to meet one’s nutritional needs.

 

Fortunately, efforts to reduce food waste are growing across the country. NRDC itself notes that an initial report it released in 2012 helped lead the USDA in 2015 to declare a goal to reduce food waste in half by 2030. More broadly, a range of innovative nonprofit efforts have expanded. NRDC acknowledges that the data are spotty, but contends that “much progress has occurred.” In Denver, Beaty’s profile of We Don’t Waste tells one such story. Indeed, NRDC itself has profiled Denver and observes that Denver “is fortunate to have a fairly extensive food rescue system.”

 

Denver, Beaty notes, presently salvages up to 70 percent of all grocery waste. Beaty adds that Denver fills “a greater portion of [its] hunger needs with waste than New York City or Nashville and [its] “meal gap” is overall smaller than those two cities.”

 

We Don’t Waste was founded by Arlan Preblud, a former attorney, in 2009. “He started We Don’t Waste in his Volvo,” Beaty writes. “If you had a loaf of bread, I was willing to take that,” Preblud says. “I didn’t know how it was going to work.”

 

Today, the nonprofit operates a small fleet of trucks. Beaty notes that according to We Don’t Waste’s 2016 annual report, distribution has increased from rescuing $2 million worth of food in 2014 to rescuing almost $33 million worth of food in 2016.

dc-kitchen-food.jpg

 

Nutritious ingredients,”

DC Central Kitchen


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#4
rennerpetey

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So, the way I figure it is you can either learn not to waste food, or you can learn to love eating crickets.

 

I've had crickets, they were flavorless, but crunchy.  They can be flavored with powder, like potato chips.  They really weren't bad.  Imagine going to the store, and instead of potato chips, they have crickets.  BBQ crickets, cheddar crickets, sour cream & onion crickets.


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John Lennon dares you to make sense of this

Spoiler

#5
caltrek

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Let them eat crickets.


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#6
Zeitgeist123

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im actually more interested with food preservation. it does seem that our food preservation technology has never really advanced. we are still using preservatives in our food for a longer shelf life. i have not heard of one startup trying to make preserve food without the use of preservatives into food. 

im more insterested in this because if someone developed a technology that can preserve food that can last a long long time, thats going to save us a lot of money, food waste, environment degredation, less hungry people and healthier food. 

 

is it possible for us to develop a food preservation technology without integrating preservatives in the food but still maintain a longer shelf life. like 2 years, 10 years or even longer?


“Philosophy is a pretty toy if one indulges in it with moderation at the right time of life. But if one pursues it further than one should, it is absolute ruin." - Callicles to Socrates


#7
caltrek

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^^^Here is a book you might be interested in:

 

Innovative Technologies for Food Preservation1st Edition

 

https://www.elsevier...8-0-12-811031-7

 

Introduction:

 

Innovative Technologies for Food Preservation: Inactivation of Spoilage and Pathogenic Microorganisms covers the latest advances in non-thermal processing, including mechanical processes (such as high pressure processing, high pressure homogenization, high hydrodynamic pressure processing, pressurized fluids); electromagnetic technologies (like pulsed electric fields, high voltage electrical discharges, Ohmic heating, chemical electrolysis, microwaves, radiofrequency, cold plasma, UV-light); acoustic technologies (ultrasound, shockwaves); innovative chemical processing technologies (ozone, chlorine dioxide, electrolysis, oxidized water) and others like membrane filtration and dense phase CO2. The title also focuses on understanding the effects of such processing technologies on inactivation of the most relevant pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms to ensure food safety and stability.

 

Over the course of the 20th century, the interest and demand for the development and application of new food preservation methods has increased significantly. The research in the last 50 years has produced various innovative food processing technologies and the use of new technologies for inactivation of spoilage and/or pathogenic microorganisms will depend on several factors. At this stage of development there is a need to better understand the mechanisms that govern microbial inactivation as induced by new and innovative processing technologies, as well as suitable and effective conditions for inactivating the microorganism.

 

 

From the abstract to chapter one:

 

https://www.scienced...128110317000017

 

Abstract:

 

The food microbiological stability is achieved by the reduction of the initial microbial load using a suitable procedure (generally a thermal process) followed by maintaining the residual microbial load to acceptable levels.

 

The factors that affect microbial growth are generally classified into two groups: intrinsic (i.e., of the food) and extrinsic (i.e., of the environment) factors. The main intrinsic factors of food are its water activity (aw), pH and acidity, redox potential (Eh), and the nutrient content. The main extrinsic factors are the temperature and atmospheric composition. The microbial growth will therefore be faster or slower depending on the composition of these factors in relation to the microbial requirements.

 

Therefore, understanding the factors that affect microbial inactivation and growth is essential to guarantee safe and stable products.

 

This chapter describes the main conventional technologies for food preservation, as well as their combination through the hurdle technology.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#8
caltrek

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Hello crickets, good-by chocolate?

 

Chocolate Shortage May Lead To Disappearance Within 40 Years

 

http://www.ibtimes.c...dium=most_read5

 

Introduction:

 

(International Business Times) Chocolate could reportedly vanish as early as 2050. This revelation has led scientists from the University of California at Berkeley to work with Virginia-based manufacturer Mars, Incorporated to save the cacao plant from disappearing. 

 

Warmer temperatures and drier weather conditions are expected to be the root of the cacao plants' potential disappearance, according to Business Insider. New technology, known as CRISPR, is being used by UC Berkeley scientists to modify the DNA of the plants. The crop's tiny seedlings would be able to survive in different climates if the experiment is proven successful.

 

Cacao plants originated millions of years ago in South America. The crop is only capable of growing in the lower story of the evergreen rainforest, where warm temperatures and rainfall are plentiful. It's also frequently victim to fungal disease and climate change. More than half of the world's chocolate now comes from two countries in West Africa, being Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana.

 

However, these regions will soon become an unsuitable host environment for the cacao plant. 

 

Joseph Boahen Aidoo, chief executive of Ghana's cocoa board COCOBOD, specifically addressed the Cocoa Swollen Shoot Virus (CSSVD) infesting farms throughout the country in addition to ongoing pest problems wreaking havoc on the cocoa farms. Speaking with GhanaWeb Saturday, Aidoo detailed his recent tours of the country's Western South and North cocoa growing fields. Aidoo called upon Ghana health officials and accompanying government economic directors to collect samples of the current diseased pods for study on how to rehabilitate the country's infestation issues.


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#9
Ewolf20

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Hello crickets, good-by chocolate?

 

Chocolate Shortage May Lead To Disappearance Within 40 Years

 

http://www.ibtimes.c...dium=most_read5

 

Introduction:

 

(International Business Times) Chocolate could reportedly vanish as early as 2050. This revelation has led scientists from the University of California at Berkeley to work with Virginia-based manufacturer Mars, Incorporated to save the cacao plant from disappearing. 

 

Warmer temperatures and drier weather conditions are expected to be the root of the cacao plants' potential disappearance, according to Business Insider. New technology, known as CRISPR, is being used by UC Berkeley scientists to modify the DNA of the plants. The crop's tiny seedlings would be able to survive in different climates if the experiment is proven successful.

 

Cacao plants originated millions of years ago in South America. The crop is only capable of growing in the lower story of the evergreen rainforest, where warm temperatures and rainfall are plentiful. It's also frequently victim to fungal disease and climate change. More than half of the world's chocolate now comes from two countries in West Africa, being Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana.

 

However, these regions will soon become an unsuitable host environment for the cacao plant. 

 

Joseph Boahen Aidoo, chief executive of Ghana's cocoa board COCOBOD, specifically addressed the Cocoa Swollen Shoot Virus (CSSVD) infesting farms throughout the country in addition to ongoing pest problems wreaking havoc on the cocoa farms. Speaking with GhanaWeb Saturday, Aidoo detailed his recent tours of the country's Western South and North cocoa growing fields. Aidoo called upon Ghana health officials and accompanying government economic directors to collect samples of the current diseased pods for study on how to rehabilitate the country's infestation issues.

 

yeah. chocolate's gonna be saved...sort of.



#10
As We Rise

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GMO cocoa. ^

Ethnic nationalism is a necessity in order to preserve true diversity of cultures. 


#11
Erowind

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I saw the title of the thread and just had to. In all seriousness entomophagy is actually a pretty viable source of food, if we can get over our preconceptions.


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Current status: slaving away for the math gods of Pythagoras VII.


#12
caltrek

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I saw the title of the thread and just had to. In all seriousness entomophagy is actually a pretty viable source of food, if we can get over our preconceptions.

 

 

Possibly.  I am just having some fun getting over the preconceptions part.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#13
Alislaws

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I saw the title of the thread and just had to. In all seriousness entomophagy is actually a pretty viable source of food, if we can get over our preconceptions.

So... " A Meat Processing Professional Reviews Snowpiercer" (this is a joke article, also I don't think the writer is a real meat processing professional!)



#14
caltrek

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FUTURE TRENDS FOR FOOD PROCESSING PLANTS REVEALED

 

https://www.processi...lants-revealed/

 

Entire Article:

 

(Processing Magazine) While it is impossible to predict what food processing plants of the future are going to look like, there are a few trends that will certainly play a significant role for the future of the industry. According to Food Processing, sustainability and technology are the two key features that will shape the food processing industry in the years ahead.

 

Sustainability is not so much about environmental issues as efficiency on all levels. Efficiency comes with lower spending and optimized production, meaning that the food processing plants of the future are likely to be operated by fewer people and will be smaller but smarter. This allows more flexibility in terms of production capacity and diversification.

 

Food Processing explains that regional production is another key trend that is likely to gain more ground in the future. Transporting goods halfway across North America is no longer an option, not only because it is not economically viable but also because of the carbon emissions associated with moving goods long distances.

 

Meanwhile, production will be made more secure and reliable. Plants are being fitted with solar panels and diesel generators to make sure production is not affected by potential power outages. As technologies develop, new machines provide more precision and standardization of processes. Newer equipment features updated designs, making it easier to sanitize and ensuring that plants meet higher safety requirements. In the future we are also likely to see more machines that clean themselves, the website noted.

TS_176824072_360x235.jpg?resize=360%2C23


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#15
caltrek

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New trends shaping the future of food

 

 

http://www.feedstuff...ing-future-food

 

Introduction:

 

(Feedstuffs) New forces are shaping the future of food, according to several Cargill researchers and marketers who recently attended the Future of Food-Tech summit in New York City, wherein investors, scientists, and food makers gathered to talk about what’s behind the trends in food innovation and investment.

 

1. Personalization is key.

 

According to the Cargill personnel who attended, the number one trend emerging from the summit was that personalization is key. From meal delivery services that customize menus for dietary needs, to companies that create products tailored to an individual’s gut health, there’s no one-size-fits-all when it comes to food.

 

“The food industry is getting closer to the consumer,” said Raven Kropf, director of emerging customers with Cargill’s protein business. She noted that the drive toward personalization is changing the way that people shop.

 

2. Ethical production matters.

 

Consumers continue to seek products that align with their values, and that they consider to be responsibly produced. The same goes for many investors looking to participate in the food industry.

 

“There’s a new community shaping the future of food,” said Sharon Walbert, assistant vice president and strategy and innovation manager for Cargill’s starches, sweeteners and texturizers business. “Many investors are choosing projects based on their ideology, with a drive toward ethical food consumption.”

 

 

The article continues by discussing three other trends.


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#16
caltrek

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Is Seaweed the Next Big Thing in Sustainable Food?

 

https://civileats.co...stainable-food/

 

Introduction:

 

(Civil Eats) As Tollef Olsen throws a white buoy labeled “SEAFARM” into Portland, Maine’s Casco Bay on a cold, clear November day, he reminisces about talking to the Maine Sea Coast Vegetables founder Shep Erhart back in the early 1980s about the environmental benefits of farming seaweed.

 

Olsen recites: “No land, no fresh water, no fertilizer, no pesticides [used]…it also sequesters carbon.” But the big question was always, would people actually eat it? “Erhart would say, ‘There’s just not enough of a market.’ Now, he’s like, ‘Yup, it’s time. It’s working.’”

 

The buoy is one visible sign of that shift. It marks the coordinates of a corner of a new four-acre plot of ocean that Olsen will soon seed with sugar kelp, as part of his rapidly expanding farming operations that supply Ocean’s Balance, an edible seaweed company he co-founded with Mitchell Lench and Lisa Scali.

 

Ocean’s Balance, which started selling a kelp puree in January 2017, was recently picked up by four new distributors, and the number of stores carrying the product has increased 40 percent in six months. And that expansion is happening alongside other seaweed producers and sellers in the state. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has awarded numerous grants to Maine seaweed producers like VitaminSea and Maine Fresh Sea Farms over the past several years.

 

In October, the U.S. Department of Energy gave the University of New England (UNE) a $1.3 million grant to support its seaweed farming research. Maine’s Island Institute is also training an increasing number of entrepreneurs in seaweed aquaculture every year.

171218-seaweed-farm-top1.jpg


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#17
bgates276

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People already eat seaweed in East Asia. I worked for a year in Korea, and when I went out to restaurants, I'd usually have it alongside my ramen. It comes in dried sheets and is also used to roll gimbap, the Korean version of sushi. I'd describe it with one word: salty. It's actually not bad tasting. It makes a good snack as well.


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#18
caltrek

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Big Data Suggests Big Potential for Urban Farming

 

 

https://www.citylab....farming/552770/

 

Introduction:

 

(City Lab) Gotham Greens’ boxed lettuces have been popping up on the shelves of high-end grocers in New York and the Upper Midwest since 2009, and with names like “Windy City Crunch,” “Queens Crisp,” and “Blooming Brooklyn Iceberg,” it’s clear the company is selling a story as much as it is selling salad.

 

Grown in hydroponic greenhouses on the rooftops of buildings in New York and Chicago, the greens are shipped to nearby stores and restaurants within hours of being harvested. That means a fresher product, less spoilage, and lower transportation emissions than a similar rural operation might have—plus, for the customer, the warm feeling of participating in a local food web.

 

“As a company, we want to connect urban residents to their food, with produce grown a few short miles from where you are,” said Viraj Puri, Gotham Greens’ co-founder and CEO.

 

Gotham Greens’ appealing narrative and eight-figure annual revenues suggest a healthy future for urban agriculture. But while it makes intuitive sense that growing crops as close as possible to the people who will eat them is more environmentally friendly than shipping them across continents, evidence that urban agriculture is good for the environment has been harder to pin down.

 

 

A widely cited 2008 study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found that transportation from producer to store only accounts for 4 percent of food’s total greenhouse gas emissions, which calls into question the concern over “food miles.” Meanwhile, some forms of urban farming may be more energy-intensive than rural agriculture, especially indoor vertical farms that rely on artificial lighting and climate control.

 

 

 feb-16_urban-farm.jpg?w=990

 

 

Olivier Polet/Zuma

 

 

 

 

Anybody have any experiences with urban farming that they want to share?


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#19
caltrek

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Jellyfish Chips: A Delicious Oxymoron

 

http://blogs.discove...ellyfish-chips/

 

Introduction:

 

(Discover) Ah, nothing beats the crispy crunch of a jellyfish chip. Wait, what?

 

Forget “Lady Doritos,” jellyfish chips are a future snack for the masses. It turns out that the swimming gelatinous invertebrates can be leached of water to leave behind a thin, crispy wafer. It tastes of sea salt, apparently.

 

Crispy, Crunchy

 

News of the delicacy first appeared last summer, when Mie Pedersen, a gastrophysicist from the University of Southern Denmark announced that she and her team had found a new way to prepare jellyfish and turn them into snacks. Her method involves treating the animals, which can be more than 95 percent water, with ethanol and then dehydrating them. The result is a shell of collagen that makes for a satisfying treat.

 

It’s no new delicacy, either. Jellyfish have been a source of food in Asia for hundreds, and perhaps even thousands, of years. There, a month-long process involving salt and alum is used to dry out the jellyfish. The result is something that’s been described as “pickle-like” in texture, or perhaps a wet noodle, without too much flavor.

vandmand_5_custom-f2e2c82aab142fd7ec8841

 

A dried-out jellyfish chip. 

(Credit: Anders Boe/University of Southern Denmark)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#20
caltrek

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Fishing Activities on World's Oceans Can Now be Monitored in Real Time

 

http://blogs.discove...as-agriculture/

 

Introduction:

 

(Discover)To satisfy our hunger, we humans catch something on the order of one trillion fish ever year — a yield that amounts to more than 90 million tons of animal flesh.

 

We’re clearly the top predator of the seas. But just how much of the oceans are being fished at an industrial scale, what are the patterns, and how are they changing over time?

 

Answering those questions could help us make fishing more sustainable.

 

And now, scientists have come up with some answers.

 

Using common ship-tracking technology, and self-learning computer programs to process huge volumes of data, a team of researchers has produced the first ever picture of the global footprint of fishing.

 

This is all well and good and sounds like it would be a genuinely useful data gathering procedure.  Still, the hardest part will be to summon the will to undertake sustainable practices.  Although there has been some progress in international agreements, all too often the fishing industry treats fish as a supply to be mined, not as a renewable resource.  Shot term profits trump long term planning and sustainable practices.  

 

Additionally, most of the 1% who are the wealthiest don't care.  They can afford slowly escalating food prices.  This may be the great flaw of capitalism. Motivations for high short term profits, but little care for long term consequences.

 

One partial exception to this depressing trend is the lobster industry in Maine.  There, for many, lobstering is a way of life, a way of life that parents want to pass on to their children.  So the cultural orientation is a little bit more toward sustainable practices.  Still, in the Gulf of Maine the number of young lobsters is beginning to decline, as discussed in the following article:

 

Despite Record-Breaking Harvests, Fewer Baby Lobsters in Gulf of Maine

 

http://lcnme.com/ann...ers-gulf-maine/

 

Introduction:

 

Despite an abundance of egg-bearing adult lobsters and record-breaking harvests, the number of young lobsters continues to fall in the Gulf of Maine. That is the 2016 update from the American Lobster Settlement Index, an international monitoring program founded in 1989 by University of Maine marine scientist Rick Wahle.

 

The American Lobster Settlement Index, a collaboration between fishermen and scientists, annually quantifies the population of newly settled American lobsters, Homarus americanus, at more than 100 sites in lobster-producing regions of New England and Atlantic Canada.

  

In the Gulf of Maine, most monitoring sites from Beaver Harbour, New Brunswick to Cape Cod Bay reported some of the lowest settlements since the late 1990s or early 2000s.

This trend of high egg production but declining numbers of baby lobsters has been occurring since about 2007. Scientists and fishermen are working to better understand the changing lobster population and what those changes could mean for the marine economy.

 

“If we were to see a collapse in the lobster catch, it would mean that we’re already seven to eight years into a decline in the population,” Wahle said. “Through ALSI, we can get an early warning of what might happen to the catch.”

 

 

I know. No worries. Let them eat crickets and all that.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






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