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The Future of Food

Food CRISPR GMO Gene Modification Agriculture

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#61
caltrek

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Grab Launches Food Delivery Service In India

 

https://techcrunch.com/

 

Introduction:

 

(Technocrunch) Fresh from completing its acquisition of Uber’s Southeast Asia business, ride-hailing firm Grab has officially launched its food delivery business — GrabFood — today.

The service is already available in beta in a handful of countries, including Thailand, but now it is available in Singapore (Grab  HQ) with plans to reach Grab’s core six markets in Southeast Asia in the coming months. As part of its acquisition of Uber Southeast Asia, Grab took charge of UberEats in the region and moved its merchants and customer base to GrabFood before shuttering the Uber  service.

 

GrabFood is available as a standalone app in Singapore, but in countries where Grab offers motorbikes on-demand the service is integrated into the core Grab app. The service will compete against the likes of Deliveroo, FoodPanda, Go-Jek’s  GoFood, and others.

 

The GrabFood service is also tied to Grab’s rewards and loyalty program — GrabRewards — and customers can use cash, cards or GrabPay to pay for their orders. Two notable features allow customers schedule orders in advance while there is also no minimum spend on orders.

 

Grab announced a deal to buy rival Uber’s local business in March, although the deal itself doesn’t seem to have progressed quite as smoothly as expected. As TechCrunch reported last month, a mixture of regulatory concerns, disgruntled employees scheduled to transition to Grab and consumer concern at the lack of competition have weighed on what is Grab’s coming-of-age moment.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#62
caltrek

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Yes, but if the 50 farmers only carry their potatoes an average of one mile each, whereas the 1 farmer carries his potatoes a median of 500 miles...

 

The 1 mile may be an exaggeration, but the 500 miles certainly is not. 

that depends on the number of potatoes the larger one can carry and again there is a neat little bit where 50 pounds moved at once is more efficient (with regard to engines and machines moving them) than moving 50 pounds as 50 individual units. try it. put 900 playing cars on one side of your house and carry them to the other. Now take 900 playing cards and move them one at a time across the room you are in.

 

 

Again, remember that corporate agriculture is very good at moving produce to local warehouses.  What needs further discussion is distribution from local warehouses to the consumer.  For example, if the local farm  (or garden plot) is closer to the consumer than the local warehouse....

 

Admittedly, such a study would also need to look at transport of inputs to the local farmer (or garden plot).  For example, if said farmer imports a lot of fertilizer from a significant distance from his farm...


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#63
caltrek

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Are avocados toast?

 

What will we eat in 2050? California farmers are placing bets.

 

https://grist.org/ar...e-placing-bets/

 

lemon-avocado-prickly-pear.jpg?w=1600&h=


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#64
MrJazz

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People must develop GMO technology because it's only way to feed all humanity or kill who knows  :cool:



#65
caltrek

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Climate Change Driving Fish to Change Habitats

 

https://www.courthou...hange-habitats/

 

Introduction:

 

(Courthouse News) — Climate change is prompting fish species to move to new habitats faster than the global system of distributing fish stock, potentially triggering international conflicts, the journal Science reported Thursday.

 

The report indicates that fisheries for new species are likely to show up for the first time in more than 70 nations around the globe. Newly shared fisheries have led to conflicts among nations in the past.

 

These disputes have led to overfishing, diminishing the food supply, profits and fishery-related employment, in addition to hindering international relations.

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions also would reduce the potential for conflict, according to the report.

 

“Most people may not understand that the right to harvest particular species of fish is often decided by national and regional fisheries management bodies,” said lead author Malin Pinsky, an assistant professor of ecology, evolution and natural resources at Rutgers University.

 

Maine.Boats_.png?resize=300%2C162

 

Lobster boats anchored off Cutler, Maine.

Photo by Malin Pinsky, Rutgers University-New Brunswick.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#66
caltrek

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It looks like in the future coffee has a good chance to stay in our diets.

 

California Moves to Declare Coffee Safe From Cancer Risk

 

https://www.courthou...om-cancer-risk/

 

Introduction:

 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California officials bucked a recent court ruling Friday and offered reassurance to concerned coffee drinkers that their fix won’t give them cancer.

 

The unprecedented action by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment to propose a regulation to essentially clear coffee of the stigma that it could pose a toxic risk followed a review of more than 1,000 studies published this week by the World Health Organization that found inadequate evidence that coffee causes cancer.

 

The state agency implements a law passed by voters in 1986 that requires warnings of chemicals known to cause cancer and birth defects.

 

One of those chemicals is acrylamide, which is found in many things and is a byproduct of coffee roasting and brewing present in every cup of joe.

 

If the regulation is adopted, it would be a huge win for the coffee industry which faces potentially massive civil penalties after recently losing an 8-year-old lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court that could require scary warnings on all coffee packaging sold in California.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#67
caltrek

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Pizza Hut commits to antibiotic-free chicken wings by 2022

 

https://www.theverge...ings-commitment

 

Entire Article:

 

(The Verge) The use of antibiotics in chicken farming has by now been widely repudiated by US fast-food joints, including the likes of Chick-fil-AMcDonald’sKFC, and Subway. Pizza Hut is already among their number, with the fulfilled promise of eliminating chicken raised with antibiotics important to human medicine from its pizzas last year. Today, the company expands its commitment to using chicken free of human-relevant antibiotics to cover all of its chicken products, including WingStreet wings, setting a deadline of 2022.

 

The specific language of “antibiotics important to human medicine” (as defined by the World Health Organization) leaves room for Pizza Hut to continue serving chicken treated with some antibiotics. Even so, in removing the ones that matter to current human medicine, fast-food restaurants are helping to ameliorate the problem of antibiotic resistance, which the regular consumption of chicken pumped full of antibiotics has created. It’s encouraging to see public dissatisfaction with the practice of serving antibiotic-laden chicken turning into real change, though the four-year timeline that Pizza Hut has set for itself seems like a luxuriously long time, especially when fellow Yum! Brands subsidiary KFC expects to achieve the same goal by the end of 2018.

fdvcs.0.jpg

Image: Pizza Hut


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#68
Raklian

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It looks like in the future coffee has a good chance to stay in our diets.

 

California Moves to Declare Coffee Safe From Cancer Risk

 

https://www.courthou...om-cancer-risk/

 

 

 

I had been a little concerned about this but now I'm relieved. I'm an avid coffee drinker myself. I drink it completely black because it's loaded with antioxidants you would otherwise won't get if you put in milk or any kind of creamer in it.


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What are you without the sum of your parts?

#69
starspawn0

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China is experimenting with highly automated farming:

 

https://www.bloomber...ot-farm-is-here

 

One day, there won't be any farmers.  Farms will be run mostly by robots.  Some such farms are already being tried on an experimental basis in England and other countries.  The planting, watering, weeding, fertilizing, and picking are all carried out by machine.


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#70
caltrek

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Where I live in California is within easy bicycling distance of some of the most advanced agriculture in the world.  Highly automated. Highly industrial.  Robotic farming is now being actively looked at, especially as Trump tightens the screws on immigration, both legal and illegal.  

 

One change I noticed before I retired and while I was actually being paid to write up reports about such things was the shift from seasonal employment to year round employment. The reduction in seasonal employment was a result of the introduction of harvesting automation.  Year round employment was less impacted because somebody needed to prep and maintain the machinery.  There was also the issue of pest control.  I posted elsewhere a short write-up on integrated pest management.  New procedures make such pest management more efficient, but doe not make the problem go away completely.  So some year round employment was needed on that front. 


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#71
caltrek

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The Future of Pork Chops

 

https://www.motherjo...-the-pork-chop/

 

Introduction:

 

Jonathan Safran Foer is probably best known for his novels Everything Is Illuminated and Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close, which is set in New York shortly after 9/11. But in the late 2000s, he took a break from fiction. As he prepared to become a father, Foer was irked by the idea of eating meat—how would he explain or justify killing creatures to his future kids? The question became a book, Eating Animals. Then the book became a bestseller. And this year, a documentary—narrated by the actress and vegan activist Natalie Portman.

 

Foer makes a persuasive case... (see link provided above for the rest of the article)

20180622_Piglet_Searsie.jpg?w=990

Searsie/Getty


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#72
caltrek

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Why the GMO industry should support truth in labeling.

 

Labeling genetically modified food makes people less panicky about it

 

https://www.theverge...mo-transparency

 

Introduction:

 

 

(The Verge) Labeling improved Vermonters’ opinions of genetically modified food, compared to elsewhere in the nation — even taking into account age and education, according to a study published in Science Advances. People who saw the labels were actually 19 percent less opposed to GMO foods, compared to people who didn’t see the labels at all.

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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#73
bgates276

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I can see that. What worries people the most, I think, is uncertainty. If people know there is some kind of risk ahead of time, they can assess their tolerance level, and make an informed decision from there. I think that a company is being upfront about it, elicits at least some trust. Then the whole thing isn't so scary.

 

Furthermore, after a while of seeing a product, you become habituated to seeing the warning signals, and it no longer is even seen as a threat. To an extent then, as long as the warning signals wern't too dramatic to begin with, a company has immunized themselves against a negative response which totally alienates the customer.



#74
funkervogt

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To support my past comments on this thread about greenhouses being cheaper and better overall than vertical farms, I offer this article: 

 

 

“My first thought was, ‘we could build a lot of greenhouses for $200 million,’” recalls Neil Mattson, a professor of plant science at Cornell and one of the country’s leading academic voices on indoor agriculture, who’s found that high-tech greenhouses that harness sunlight are more cost- and carbon-friendly than vertical farms that use artificial light.

 
...Energy and equipment costs are, by far, the largest drivers of expenses that can bring the price of operating a vertical farm close to $27 per square foot. By contrast, Agritecture’s models show that the cost to run a 100,000-square-foot smart greenhouse is roughly a third as expensive, thanks to the use of natural sunlight and more advanced automation.

https://www.eater.co...droponic-greens

 

The whole thing is worth reading. 



#75
caltrek

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How synthetic biology will — and maybe won’t — change the future of food

 

https://www.theverge...-health-science

 

Introduction:

 

(The Verge) More than a century ago, dairy farmers sounded the alarm on margarine, insisting that it wasn’t really butter, and it therefore needed to be classified differently. Today, the Food and Drug Administration is hosting a public meeting on lab-grown meat, including the question of whether it should be called “meat.”

 

Lab-grown meat is getting all the attention, but it’s far from the only product that will run into these labeling questions. Many researchers in the field of synthetic biology are using technology to create flavors and fragrances that wouldn’t occur naturally, according to Christina Agapakis, a biologist who is the creative director at Ginkgo Bioworks. Gingko, a Boston-based synthetic biology company, doesn’t engineer lab-grown meat directly, but its scientists genetically engineer microbes to make perfume and food. The Verge spoke to Agapakis about the state of cultured meat, the link between synthetic biology and sustainability, and the future of food.

 

This interview has been lightly edited for clarity.

 

(Q) It seems like this discussion about labeling synthetic foods is going to have repercussions beyond lab-grown meat. What are some of the parallels that you see in the field of synthetic biology as a whole?

 

(A) There’s certainly a greater debate than just the one around meat. For example, genetically engineered microbes: are those natural or artificial? On the regulatory side, they are labeled as “natural” because they come from plants, but there’s certainly this ambiguity around it. Even though something produced from a genetically engineered microbe might be biological, it doesn’t feel like what most people think of as “natural.” The debate is ongoing, and it fits into an even bigger one going back 100 years about whether margarine is real butter.

 

meat_steps_007.0.png


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#76
caltrek

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A Community of Slave Descendants Is Protecting Unique Food Traditions from Rising Seas

 

https://www.alternet...ons-rising-seas

 

Introduction:

 

(Alternet) In the world of southern cooking, Gullah/Geechee food is unique. It’s perloo (pirlou), a one-pot dish of rice and shrimp, smoked paprika, garlic pepper and cayenne. It’s crab meat “deviled up” with bread crumbs, egg, and cayenne and presented inside the shell. It’s dishes with roots in West Africa and the Caribbean—peanut stew, benne seed cookies, black-eyed peas fritters, and greens stewed with coconut milk.

 

In the centuries since the enslaved ancestors of the Gullah/Geechee people were brought to southeastern United States, they have maintained a heritage so rich and distinctive that they are recognized by the United Nations as a “nation within a nation.” The community—and its food—is closely tied to the agricultural and marine resources of the Lowcountry, their homeland, which stretches along the coast and sea islands between Jacksonville, North Carolina, and Jacksonville, Florida.

 

They are also a community on the front lines of climate change.

 

Over the next 50 years, sea levels may rise so dramatically as to permanently alter the Gullah/Geechee relationship to their land—and the growing, harvesting, and preparation of food. To combat the loss of the community’s unique culinary heritage, some members of the Nation are working to build a wider space in the American food landscape for Gullah/Geechee cuisine while also creating more climate resilient agricultural practices in the homeland.

 

According to some predictions, within around 25 years high tides will inundate Charleston, South Carolina, 185 times every year; in the 1970s, tidal flooding happened just twice per year. By 2100, the Atlantic Ocean could rise more than 4 feet, causing some low elevation areas to be permanently underwater. Hurricanes, which are expected to become more powerful and more frequent, will compound flooding.

121203020737-gullah-1-horizontal-large-g


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#77
caltrek

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Skyscrapers Full of Lettuce Promise an Eco-Friendly Alternative to Outdoor Farming. There’s Just One Problem.

 

https://www.motherjo...-plenty-energy/

 

Introdcution:

 

(Mother Jones) For growing food, the sun is yesterday’s technology. Soil? As quaint as an iPod. Such are the promises of vertical farms—indoor towers stacked high with crops. Waterborne nutrients feed the plants, and led lights drive their photosynthesis.

 

The idea emerged back in 2000, when Columbia University microbiologist Dickson Despommier wondered why Manhattan’s abandoned buildings couldn’t be used to grow food as efficiently as they once housed people. Free from the primitive sway of sunlight and dirt, “vertical farming can allow former cropland to go back to nature and reverse the plundering of the earth,” Ian Frazier wrote in a 2017 New Yorker article about Despommier.

 

As drought and heat waves plague the globe’s major vegetable-growing regions, the idea of farming indoors is gaining traction. AeroFarms, a New Jersey-based operation, says it uses 95 percent less water than traditional farming to grow salad greens. Plenty, a South San Francisco-based vertical-farming startup, claims to churn out “up to 350 times as much produce per square foot as a conventional farm, while using just 1 percent of the water.”

 

Vertical farming certainly has lots of venture capital sex appeal. Plenty recently got the “largest agriculture technology investment in hist­ory”—$200 million—from the likes of Amazon boss Jeff Bezos’ fund and Innovation Endeavors, co-founded by former Google CEO Eric Schmidt. AeroFarms counts former CIA chief David Petraeus and New York restaurateur David Chang as investors.

 

But here’s what the pitch decks probably don’t say: Vertical farming has a huge energy problem. Sunlight is free and renewable. Thus far, electricity is mostly neither. Just ask anyone who ever ran a grow house: Photosynthesis, the process by which plants transform light energy into calories, requires fossil fuels—unless your grow is powered by renewables, and most are not.

20180525_vertical_2000x1124.jpg?w=990

Jun Cen


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#78
Alislaws

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Not really a fan of that sort of perspective.

 

It seems to imply that anyone trying to push any new way of doing things should have to stop, bring about a 100% sustainable energy grid and then ​they can be allowed to start on their great project. 

 

Same sort of thing as people complaining about how electric cars don't use 100% sustainable energy sources. 

 

If global warming continues to worsen, global crop yields could be hammered and massively fertile regions today might be un-farmable in 20 years, but no we should definitely not investigate the ultra efficient low resource, low environmental impact, location independent, weather/climate proof, automated farming options until decades after someone perfects fusion energy. /s



#79
caltrek

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^As with a lot of other things, a lot will depend on how the economics of it all works out. Food is something everybody needs, so if push comes to shove folks may spend a little bit more to assure themselves of a good food supply.

 

 

Then there are factors such as taste that may affect choices of foods such as lettuce from a vertical farmer versus some other crop. Here is an article that suggests how developments in plant breeding may affect the taste variable:

 

 

Squash Is a Mediocre Vegetable. It Doesn’t Have to Be That Way.

 

https://www.motherjo...es-chefs-beets/

 

Introduction:

 

We’re often told to eat our vegetables, and for good reason. But face it: They often kind of suck. Our supermarkets teem with towers of flawless looking squashes and tomatoes—but where’s the flavor? 

 

For generations, plant breeders have largely been taking their orders from the food industry, in pursuit of varieties that are high-yielding and that can withstand long-haul travel. Flavor isn’t a priority—flavor comes from adding lots of salt, sugar, and fat in the factory, or from a restaurant chef’s bag of tricks. But at an event I attended in 2013, Dan Barber, chef of the acclaimed Blue Hill restaurants in New York, assembled a team of agriculture professors and rolled out a new idea: What if seed breeders started taking their cues from chefs instead of big food companies when they’re tweaking varieties of the fruits, vegetables, and wheat we eat? 

 

20180726_ButternutSquash.jpg?w=990

Kirk McKoy/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#80
caltrek

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Oh boy.  I think I will just present this one with no further comment on my part.

 

Pot-Infused Beer Has Hit Shelves. Is It Legal?

 

https://www.motherjones.com/food/2018/08/pot-infused-beer-has-hit-shelves-is-it-legal/

 

Introduction:

 

(Mother Jones) Marijuana’s slow but steady legalization across the United States has meant the joints, pot brownies, and bongs of your college days have given way to high-tech vaping, single-origin “special” chocolates, and haute-cuisine cannabis dinners. And at least one beer now contains cannabidiol, or CBD, the non-psychoactive chemical found in both cannabis and hemp. Coalition Brewing, an Oregon-based craft brewery, started marketing a CBD beer called Two Flowers IPA in late 2016.

 

Now, some companies are combining beer with tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the main chemical in cannabis that gets you high. Brands like CERIA Beverages—co-founded by the creator of Blue Moon Brewing Company, Keith Villa—and Two Roots Brewing Co. removed the alcohol from their craft beers and replaced it with THC. Lagunitas Brewing Company released a THC-infused sparkling water called Hi-Fi Hops in California on Monday. All of these drinks will be sold at marijuana dispensaries.

 

Two Roots and CERIA Beverages are not alcohol manufacturers so they don’t have to contend with the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), which must certify alcoholic drink formulas before they’re sold. But Lagunitas is: So while the Hi-Fi hop-water uses Lagunitas’ branding, the company turned to a cannabis producer and distributor called CannaCraft to add the THC and sell the beverage.

  

Lagunitas’ website notes that the company “does not cultivate, manufacture, distribute, or sell any cannabis product.” As Ron Lindenbusch, Lagunitas’ chief marketing officer, explains: “Basically, once [CannaCraft takes] the hop-water, they keep all the profits from there.”  

 

Jamie Evans, founder of a gourmet cannabis lifestyle brand and blog called The Herb Somm, thinks that alcohol companies jumping into the cannabis market is smart, regardless of short-term profit or lack thereof. “Once cannabis becomes federally legal…companies like Lagunitas will have made a name for themselves and will have brand recognition in the infused beverage category,” she wrote in an email. Evans also mentioned that there’s new support for federal legalization from alcohol industry trade groups and alcohol manufacturing companies, suggesting an interest in cannabis experimentation.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Food, CRISPR, GMO, Gene Modification, Agriculture

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