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The Future of Food

Food CRISPR GMO Gene Modification Agriculture

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#81
caltrek

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New global study reveals the ‘staggering’ loss of forests caused by industrial agriculture

 

http://www.sciencema...ial-agriculture

 

Introduction:

 

(Science) A new analysis of global forest loss—the first to examine not only where forests are disappearing, but also why—reveals just how much industrial agriculture is contributing to the loss. The answer: some 5 million hectares—the area of Costa Rica—every year. And despite years of pledges by companies to help reduce deforestation, the amount of forest cleared to plant oil palm and other booming crops remained steady between 2001 and 2015.

 

The finding is “a really big deal,” says tropical ecologist Daniel Nepstad, director of the Earth Innovation Institute, an environmental nonprofit in San Francisco, California, because it suggests that corporate commitments alone are not going to adequately protect forests from expanding agriculture.

 

Researchers already had a detailed global picture of forest loss and regrowth. In 2013, a team led by Matthew Hansen, a remote-sensing expert at the University of Maryland in College Park, published high-resolution maps of forest change between 2000 and 2012 from satellite imagery. But the maps, available online, didn’t reveal where deforestation—the permanent loss of forest—was taking place.

 

For the new analysis, Philip Curtis, a geospatial analyst working with The Sustainability Consortium, a nonprofit headquartered in Fayetteville, Arkansas, trained a computer program to recognize five causes of forest loss in satellite images: wildfire, logging of tree plantations, large-scale agriculture, small-scale agriculture, and urbanization. To teach the software, Curtis spent weeks staring at thousands of images from Google Earth that showed deforestation with a known cause. “It was some of the most distressing part of the work,” he says, especially when looking at Southeast Asia. “The scale of the loss was staggering.”

 

The program’s decisions were based on mathematical properties of the images, which can help distinguish the larger blocky shapes of industrial agriculture from the smaller, irregular fields in shifting subsistence farming, for example. All told, about 27% of the total loss between 2001 and 2015 was due to large-scale farming and ranching, Curtis and his colleagues report today in Science. Such farming includes industrial plantations for palm oil, a valuable biofuel and a major ingredient in food, cosmetics, and other products. Forest cleared for those plantations is gone for good, whereas forest cleared for other purposes, including small-scale farming, typically grows back. (Urbanization, also a permanent conversion, made up just 1% of the total loss of forest.)

forest_16x9.jpg?itok=JTFzruKt

Forest on Borneo in Indonesia, cut down for an oil palm plantation.

JAMI TARRIS/MINDEN PICTURES


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#82
caltrek

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The above story made me think of another theme related to the potential future of food. That caused me to find this article:

 

Amazon Rain Forest Food

 

http://thinkjungle.c...ainforest-food/

 

Introduction:

 

(ThinkJungle)

 

Although there are many dishes served in the Amazon region, the main foods are centered around fish and a great many of the 2000 or so species of Amazon fish are eaten. There are also other Amazon foods to find like a range of delicious fruit, Brazilian BBQ, international dishes, and food for the not-so-squeamish like beetle grubs. You will also see a large amount of bush meat. This includes the deceptively abundant turtle eggs, a conservation problem in themselves, and other meat that threatens many animals.

 

  • Juanes

In the Peruvian Amazon Rainforest, you will find juanes being sold at markets or on street corners by local vendors. They are a mixture of rice and meat (usually chicken) and different herbs rolled in banana leaves. These are one of my favorite street foods and its handy parcel makes a great biodegradable packet if you’re on the go. You will especially see these bundles of food on June 24 at the celebration of the patron saint in Peru’s Amazon, San Juan.

 

  • Suri

If you’re perusing Peruvian Amazon markets and street stalls, you will soon be greeted by sticks skewering many large grub-like animals known locally as suri. These are the grubs of the palm weevil (Rhynchophorus palmarum) and are a local delicacy. Entomophagy (the eating of insects) is a suggested idea to aid the world’s hunger problems, and to limit deforestation and habitat loss. Insects are low in fat, high in protein, quick to grow and breed, are cheap to raise and purchase, require little area to live, and, if you’re brave enough to break your familiarity issues, delicious. They can also be farmed in people’s homes. So what’s the issue? Is it simply that we aren’t familiar with eating them and that they look scary?

 

  • Ceviche

If you visit Ecuador or Peru, you will hear this dish mentioned or see it in restaurants, including Amazon towns like Puerto Maldonado and Iquitos. The dish consists of raw fish drizzled with lemon or lime juice and spices. Ceviche usually comes with either salad or plantain chips. Most people seem to have a love or hate relationship with this particular fish dish.

 

ceviche.jpg

Ceviche


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#83
caltrek

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Acai Berries

 

https://blogs.wwf.or...rom-the-amazon/

 

Extract:

 

(World Wildlife Fund)

 

Acai berries

 

Heralded as the super fruit of superfoods, açaí is already a massive health food hit. The açaí palm tree grows naturally in the Amazon rainforest and its berries, rich in protein and minerals, can be harvested without harming the forest or the species that live there.

 

The Amazon might seem like a very faraway place, but it affects us all.

 

Unfortunately, some products are grown in a way that causes harm to the rainforest and the people and animals that live there. You can make sure you’re making a positive impact by choosing products that contain one or more of the following labels:

  • Fairtrade
  • Organic
  • Rainforest Alliance
  • Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)
  • RSPO (Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil)

Want to learn more about the Amazon and what it has to offer? Check out blogs from our South American experts Karina BergDamian FlemingSarah Hutchison, and Jamie Gordon.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#84
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Sustainable Farming In The Amazon Rainforest

 

https://epicureandcu...zon-rainforest/

 

Extract:

 

(Epicure and Culture) For the most part, farming in the Amazon has gotten a bad reputation for destroying rainforest land and habitats and leading to its commercialization; however, agricultural practices have existed in the rainforest for thousands of years without causing any disruptions to the local ecosystems, and the agricultural conflicts are really only a recent phenomenon. Luckily, new Amazon Rainforest tours, sustainable partnerships and traditional methods are helping combat the problem.

 

Modern vs. Traditional Farming Methods

 

Native communities in the Amazon have a longstanding history as farmers and have been able to successfully continue their practices without disturbing the forest. They’ve done this by taking advantage of a traditional and sustainable form of farming known as shifting cultivation.

 

Modern agricultural practices first involve slashing and burning hundreds of acres of rainforest. This technique…is used to quickly clear the land and also brings the majority of the soil’s nutrients to the surface, facilitating a period of rapid growth potential for several years. Chemical fertilizers are then added to the soil and cash crops such as coffee, bananas, soybeans or coca are planted. While planting these crops allows the farmer to maximize their short-term profits, cultivating one type of plant all year long with the use of fertilization for years on end causes the soil quality to degrade quickly, rendering it effectively dead and unusable for agriculture. …

 

Contrastingly, while traditional shifting cultivation still requires plots of rainforest to be leveled in order to create farming ground, trees are cut down (instead of burned) and used in the construction of local buildings and houses. When it comes time to plant crops, a different crop is planted in each plot, and several are left completely empty. Each year, the position of each crop and the plots left empty are rotated so the soil has a chance to regain its nutrients. Short term profits may not be as high — as the more profitable cash crops are not grown in each plot and some plots are left completely empty — but when this method is utilized, farming practices can continue on the same plots indefinitely without causing any permanent damage to the soil.

AmazonRainforest.jpg?resize=640%2C384

Amazon Rainforest


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#85
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Study: More People Will Eat Bugs if They’re Up-Marketed as Luxury Item

 

https://www.courthou...as-luxury-item/

 

Introduction:

 

(Courthoue News) – Most people probably find crickets hard to swallow as a substitute for hamburgers.

 

With six legs, antennae and wings, insects are not the first thing people think of when looking for a protein alternative. But new research indicates bugs may be an easier sell when they’re priced and presented as a luxury food.

 

According to a study published Tuesday in Frontiers of Nutrition, if marketing can appeal to a person’s self-indulgent tastes they might look past the bug on their plate.

The Food and Agriculture Organizations of the United Nations says insects are an environmentally friendly source of protein when compared to the amount of resources needed to farm livestock. In fact, global food production accounts for 25 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Researchers behind the recent insect study say labels like “eco-friendly” or “fair trade” lose out to advertisements that play up pleasurable aspects, like taste. Insects have not scuttled into the mainstream, but researchers said it’s all about presentation

Chapulines-Crickets.jpg?resize=300%2C234

Chapulines (crickets) for sale at the Benito Juarez Market in Oaxaca de Juarez, Oaxaca, Mexico.

(NSaum75 via Wikipedia)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#86
Alislaws

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Study: More People Will Eat Bugs if They’re Up-Marketed as Luxury Item

 

Also more people will eat bugs if they are ground into a fine powder (high in protein!) and no bug images are used on any of the packaging. 


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#87
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Study: More People Will Eat Bugs if They’re Up-Marketed as Luxury Item

 

Also more people will eat bugs if they are ground into a fine powder (high in protein!) and no bug images are used on any of the packaging. 

 

 

I actually think humans can eat anything when they're successfully convinced it's the socially acceptable thing to do. It's up to the marketing psychologists to figure it out how to do just that.


  • BasilBerylium and Alislaws like this
What are you without the sum of your parts?

#88
caltrek

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Well, I have tried to keep this thread focused on science.  Still, it is hard to ignore the politics of this issue.

 

The Farm Bill Expired—Now What?

 

https://www.motherjo...pired-now-what/

 

Introduction:

 

(Mother Jones) On Sunday night, a monthslong battle over the farm bill culminated in a dead end when lawmakers in the House and Senate were unable to come to an agreement on what the bill should look like. As a result, the bill under consideration expired.

 

Congress has been battling over the farm bill, a crucial piece of legislation that covers the country’s agricultural funding on top of conservation efforts and food aid, since early this year. The bill, which comes up for consideration twice a decade, is traditionally hailed as a point of bipartisanship between Republicans and Democrats. But this year, lawmakers in the House have been split along party lines on what should be included in the bill. 

 

The Senate’s version of the measure was uncontroversial and passed in June with 86-11 vote, reflecting much of the bipartisan collaboration traditional to the farm bill. But reconciling that version with the overwhelmingly partisan House bill has proved difficult. In particular, lawmakers have clashed over language in the House bill that adds work requirements to the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), a move that would knock an estimated 2 million people off food stamps. As reported by Mother Jones‘ Tom Philpott earlier this year, SNAP work requirements don’t actually lead to increased employment. 

 

Aside from SNAP, lawmakers have butted heads on issues ranging from sugar industry programs to conservation funding to school lunch. 

20180928_corn.jpg?w=990

fotokostic/Getty


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#89
caltrek

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Here is an article where science and politics are deeply intertwined:

 

Scientists: U.S. Military Program Could Be Seen as Bioweapon

 

https://www.courthou...n-as-bioweapon/

 

Introduction:

 

NEW YORK (AP) — A research arm of the U.S. military is exploring the possibility of deploying insects to make plants more resilient by altering their genes. Some experts say the work may be seen as a potential biological weapon.

 

In an opinion paper published Thursday in the journal Science, the authors say the U.S. needs to provide greater justification for the peace-time purpose of its Insect Allies project to avoid being perceived as hostile to other countries. Other experts expressed ethical and security concerns with the research, which seeks to transmit protective traits to crops already growing in the field.

 

That would mark a departure from the current widely used procedure of genetically modifying seeds for crops such as corn and soy, before they grow into plants.

 

The military research agency says its goal is to protect the nation’s food supply from threats like drought, crop disease and bioterrorism by using insects to infect plants with viruses that protect against such dangers.

 

“Food security is national security,” said Blake Bextine, who heads the 2-year-old project at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, an arm of the U.S. Department of Defense.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#90
caltrek

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CRISPR Can Make Old Tomatoes, New Tomatoes

 

http://blogs.discove...s-new-tomatoes/

 

Introduction:

 

(Discover) It’s a big week for CRISPR! Despite being a world apart, two separate research groups had the same idea: to see if CRISPR gene editing can really mimic conventional plant breeding.

 

One group re-domesticated a wild tomato plant; the other used a similar approach to domesticate an entirely new crop: the ground cherry, a tomato relative.

 

Together, the new work demonstrates how dramatically gene editing technology could speed up crop improvement efforts worldwide.

 

How to Make a Crop Worth Growing

 

In the past few decades, conventional breeding of the tomato plant has dramatically increased its yield, fruit size, and shelf life.

 

To get a plant from its wild form to something growable as a large-scale food crop is not an easy feat. Conventional breeding requires decades of work from breeders who select the best plants, cross them, and select the best plants again from their offspring.

 

Ground-tomato.jpg

 

Ground tomatoes, still in their papery husks. 

(Credit: F_studio/Shutterstock)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#91
Alislaws

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Here is an article where science and politics are deeply intertwined:

 

Scientists: U.S. Military Program Could Be Seen as Bioweapon

 

https://www.courthou...n-as-bioweapon/

 

The US military editing the genes of targets, using a delivery system that would be almost impossible to protect against sounds a lot like biowarfare. 


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#92
caltrek

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The robotic farm of the future isn’t what you’d expect

 

https://www.theverge...ture-automation

 

Introduction:

 

(The Verge) When we think about automation, we often imagine robots just doing the work of humans. Our mental image is of an android in overalls, clocking in with a lunchbox full of oil and bolts, and grabbing a hammer. But that’s not what happens. The reality is much messier, and the process of automation is one of compromise and incremental progress.

 

Agritech startup Iron Ox is the perfect example of this. After launching in 2015 with the aim of automating the hard work of growing produce, the company unveiled its first “autonomous” production farm last week. In 8,000 square feet of indoor space (roughly 0.2 acres), its engineers use proprietary robot systems to grow roughly 26,000 heads of lettuce, leafy greens, and herbs each year in hydroponic vats. The company says it should start selling its crop in “the next couple of months,” and it will be targeting restaurants first.

 

But, as co-founder and CEO Brandon Alexander explains to The Verge, despite the “autonomous” moniker, humans still play crucial roles in this farm. They are the ones who plant each seedling and package the finished product. Robots just aren’t ready to do it all.

 

Getting to even this level of automation took years of work to navigate the constraints of modern robotics, says Alexander, who previously worked at Google’s research lab X and at influential robotics incubator Willow Garage. “There’s a huge difference between your equipment working one time for a video and it working every day,” he says. “Most people outside of robotics underestimate just how big that gap is.”

Mover_front.0.jpg

Meet Angus, Iron Ox’s robot porter, which is designed to move pallets of plants around their indoor farm. 

Photo: Iron Ox


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#93
Alislaws

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The robotic farm of the future Today isn’t what you’d expect

 

Fixed that for them. 

 

(my point being, because we can't currently automate every part of farming, in no way means we wont be able to in future, we have a couple of decades of progress at least before indoor farming will be price competitive with regular farming, assuming no sudden leaps forward in AI)



#94
caltrek

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Organic farming with gene editing: An oxymoron or a tool for sustainable agriculture?

 

https://theconversat...iculture-101585

 

Introduction:

 

(The Conversation) A University of California, Berkeley professor stands at the front of the room, delivering her invited talk about the potential of genetic engineering. Her audience, full of organic farming advocates, listens uneasily. She notices a man get up from his seat and move toward the front of the room. Confused, the speaker pauses mid-sentence as she watches him bend over, reach for the power cord, and unplug the projector. The room darkens and silence falls. So much for listening to the ideas of others.

 

Many organic advocates claim that genetically engineered crops are harmful to human health, the environment, and the farmers who work with them. Biotechnology advocates fire back that genetically engineered crops are safe, reduce insecticide use, and allow farmers in developing countries to produce enough food to feed themselves and their families.

 

Now, sides are being chosen about whether the new gene editing technology, CRISPR, is really just “GMO 2.0” or a helpful new tool to speed up the plant breeding process. In July, the European Union’s Court of Justice ruled that crops made with CRISPR will be classified as genetically engineered. In the United States, meanwhile, the regulatory system is drawing distinctions between genetic engineering and specific uses of genome editing.

 

I am a plant molecular biologist and appreciate the awesome potential of both CRISPR and genetic engineering technologies. But I don’t believe that pits me against the goals of organic agriculture. In fact, biotechnology can help meet these goals. And while rehashing the arguments about genetic engineering seems counterproductive, genome editing may draw both sides to the table for a healthy conversation. To understand why, it’s worth digging into the differences between genome editing with CRISPR and genetic engineering.

 

 

 

 

file-20181005-72100-8199mg.jpg?ixlib=rb-


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#95
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One of the world’s most important crop gene storehouses just got a funding boost

 

http://www.sciencema...t-funding-boost

 

Introduction:

 

(Science) When plant breeders want to improve crops, they turn to the diversity stored in gene banks around the world. But many of these critical storehouses, which hold seeds and other plant tissues, are in poor condition as a result of funding shortages. Now, the Crop Trust, a nonprofit based in Bonn, Germany, is aiming to help crop gene banks find firmer footing by providing a steadier source of cash. And today it announced its first award, a 5-year, renewable grant of $1.4 million annually, to the gene bank of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in Los Baños, Philippines. 

 

“These crop collections are too important to the world to be left to uncertainty,” says Marie Haga, executive director of the Crop Trust, which was founded in 2004. “They can’t depend on budgets that go up and down.”

 

The trust is best known for its work on the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, a storage facility dug into an Arctic mountain in Norway. It contains nearly 1 million samples of crop seeds gathered from gene banks over the world, kept in case disaster strikes. But the organization also has been quietly working to improve the ability of gene banks to conserve and distribute seeds, and helping the banks meet standards that qualify them for long-term funding from an endowment established by the trust.

 

After 6 years of effort, IRRI—a plant breeding center that has played a central role in developing modern, high-yield rice varieties—has now met those standards. For example, its gene bank can now make seeds from 90% of its 136,000 varieties available immediately on request. The new funding should make it easier for IRRI to sustain the sometimes labor-intensive process of maintaining its collections; for example, some crop varieties need to planted periodically, so that researchers can harvest fresh collections of viable seed.

shutterstock_560903122_16x9.jpg?itok=n4Y

Rice is one of the world’s most important crops.

SVETLANA LUKIENKO/SHUTTERSTOCK


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#96
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Insect Allies to the rescue?

 

https://thebulletin....-to-the-rescue/

 

 

(Bulletin of Atomic Scientists) Under a headline straight out of science fiction (“The Pentagon is studying an insect army to defend crops. Critics fear a bioweapon.”) the Washington Post brought readers an interesting, important, and completely nonfictional story on Friday. I could summarize the piece, but instead will let its first two paragraphs speak for themselves:

 

The Pentagon is studying whether insects can be enlisted to combat crop loss during agricultural emergencies. The bugs would carry genetically engineered viruses that could be deployed rapidly if critical crops such as corn or wheat became vulnerable to a drought, a natural blight or a sudden attack by a biological weapon. The concept envisions the viruses making genetic modifications that protect the plants immediately, during a single growing season.

 

The program, funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), has a warm and fuzzy name: “Insect Allies.” But some critics find the whole thing creepy.

 

I have quoted rather than paraphrased those paragraphs because they were crafted by one of the best and most entertaining writers in all of newspaperdom, Joel Achenbach. If you haven’t read an Achenbach story, you are in for a treat with this one, which exhibits to a high degree the deftness and wit with which he generally handles complicated subjects—in this case, a complaint from scientists and legal scholars in Science magazine “arguing that the Insect Allies program opens a ‘Pandora’s box’ and involves technology that ‘may be widely perceived as an effort to develop biological agents for hostile purposes and their means of delivery.’”.

Aphid_on_leaf05.jpg

An aphid, on a leaf.

Photo by WikiPedant at Wikimedia Commons.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#97
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Of course, one of the things affecting the future of food is the labor involved in cultivating it.

 

 

Another Nonprofit Resists a Fair Labor Measure

 

https://nonprofitqua...-labor-measure/

 

 

(Nonprofti Quarterly) In 2016, NPQ published an article by Andy Schmidt, a labor lawyer, entitled “Is Exploiting Workers Key to Your Enterprise Model? Nonprofits and the New Overtime Requirements.” Maybe this deserves a reread in Washington state, where some nonprofits oppose a proposal its Department of Labor and Industries put out for public comment that would increase the number of workers eligible for overtime pay. The measure comes on top of a graduated minimum wage hike to $12.00 next year and to $13.50 in 2020.

 

“More and more of us are working more and more hours,” the nonprofit Working Washington says on its website, “but we’re not getting paid for it. Pretty much all an employer has to do is call someone a manager and pay them a salary of at least $24,000 a year, and they can make them work as many hours as they feel like.”

 

And, indeed, that appears to be the assumption being made by some nonprofit managers, who somehow manage to craft an appeal for a continuation of unfair labor practices based on the needs of low-income children—some of whom, one could presume, live in those very families.

 

At Boys & Girls Club of Spokane County, the state’s higher minimum wage already has added about $50,000 to payroll costs, said Dick Hanlin, the executive director. The nonprofit serves about 2,000 local kids ages 6 to 18, mostly from low-income families.

 

Stricter overtime rules could force the Boys & Girls Club to reduce hours for entry-level managers or hire more part-time workers, Hanlin said. While it’s unusual for entry-level managers to work more than 40 hours per week, he said it sometimes is necessary during special events or big club fundraisers.

 

 

The article concludes with a stinging criticism of "this kind of nonsensical public positioning."  


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#98
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Living off the Land in the Arctic Circle

 

https://www.atlasobs...lapland-finland

 

Introduction:

 

(Atlas Obscura) The wild region of Lapland, in Finland, is located so far north that it experiences nearly endless summer sunlight, which locals refer to as the “Midnight Sun.” But when summer ends, the sun soon sets just a few hours after it rises. This unique, Arctic Circle climate produces flora and fauna found in few other places. For generations, residents of Lappi, as the Finnish call the area, have spent the summer and early fall hunting, butchering, and freezing moose and reindeer, as well as collecting as many berries, herbs, and mushrooms as possible.

 

Lapland’s capital, Rovaniemi, has a population of around 60,000 and multiple supermarkets, which residents could visit in lieu of storing away everything they need for the winter. But with their backyards and nearby forests offering abundant, high-quality ingredients, and grocery stores lacking beloved staples such as moose tongue and charging high prices for berries, many prefer to spend their time outdoors, preparing for winter.

Hunting With Chef Kimmo Kähkönen

 

At 4 a.m. on a rainy weekday morning, Kimmo Kähkönen, dressed head to toe in neon-orange hunting gear, releases a GPS-equipped hunting dog into the forest. Seated beside a bonfire on the forest’s outskirts, he follows the dog’s progress through an application on his daughter’s iPad. We’re at a campsite where Kähkönen often meets other members of his hunting club to enjoy snacks—grilled sausages, homemade Finnish bread with cheese, and coffee in a kuska, a Finnish wooden cup—while the dogs track moose and bear.

 

This kind of cooperation is typical in Lapland. Kähkönen belongs to Lapin Keittiömestarit r.y, an organization of some 50 chefs devoted to preserving Arctic cuisine in Finland by sharing tips on hunting, gathering, and preserving food. His hunting club shares ATVs (for transporting game) and dogs, each of which is trained to hunt a specific type of prey.

 

 

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Bear soup. 

 EILEEN CHO


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#99
Enter Ataraxia

Enter Ataraxia

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Study: More People Will Eat Bugs if They’re Up-Marketed as Luxury Item

 

Also more people will eat bugs if they are ground into a fine powder (high in protein!) and no bug images are used on any of the packaging. 

 

 

Right now I am searching on the internet where I can purchase insects to eat. There is high potential for insects as a protein alternative to the unsustainable meat industry; I am considering and probably will soon begin eating insects. It would be a plus if they were ground into a fine powder but I would not mind consuming them whole. I will report on how this goes and I am interesting to at least try it out. My conception of this currently is that I will feel like one of our ancestors...a varied diet of nuts and seeds (I eat a lot of these), some meat, many fruits and vegetables, and now a healthy load of insects. 


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"Utopia is the hope that the scattered fragments of good that we come across from time to time in our lives can be put together, one day, to reveal the shape of a new kind of life. The kind of life that yours should have been." - Bostrom

 


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caltrek

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^^^Thank you for your contribution to this thread.  I look forward to receiving further reports from you.


  • Enter Ataraxia likes this

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Food, CRISPR, GMO, Gene Modification, Agriculture

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