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The Future of Food

Food CRISPR GMO Gene Modification Agriculture

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#101
kjaggard

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Study: More People Will Eat Bugs if They’re Up-Marketed as Luxury Item

 

Also more people will eat bugs if they are ground into a fine powder (high in protein!) and no bug images are used on any of the packaging. 

 

 

Right now I am searching on the internet where I can purchase insects to eat. There is high potential for insects as a protein alternative to the unsustainable meat industry; I am considering and probably will soon begin eating insects. It would be a plus if they were ground into a fine powder but I would not mind consuming them whole. I will report on how this goes and I am interesting to at least try it out. My conception of this currently is that I will feel like one of our ancestors...a varied diet of nuts and seeds (I eat a lot of these), some meat, many fruits and vegetables, and now a healthy load of insects. 

 

have you checked out: http://www.crunchycr...edible-insects/

 

once you have a sense of what and how to eat with insects, depending on your region of the world you could likely farm your own supply. Crickets, mealworms, and black soldier fly larva/pupa are all farmable. Though crickets getting out and infesting the building, and black soldier flies complicated mating needs make meal worms the best choice.


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#102
Enter Ataraxia

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have you checked out: http://www.crunchycr...edible-insects/

 

once you have a sense of what and how to eat with insects, depending on your region of the world you could likely farm your own supply. Crickets, mealworms, and black soldier fly larva/pupa are all farmable. Though crickets getting out and infesting the building, and black soldier flies complicated mating needs make meal worms the best choice.

 

 

 

Hello everyone, hope things are going well. Recently, my insects-for-consumption arrived and I am going to share with you the experience. Also, kjaggard, I have checked out Crunchy Critters, but did not purchase anything from them. Suboptimal research was performed on part; impatience was prevalent and I simply purchased some barbecue grasshoppers from Amazon. Though I intended to buy crickets, I eventually ended up getting grasshoppers. The experience goes as follows: grasshoppers arrive in the student mailroom, I open the container and put one or two in mouth, someone sees me and looks away fast, I walk back to my dorm and eat a few more. Honestly, I have not eaten too many of them because they taste like the smell of rat food, kind of like rotten cellulose matter. There is no semblance of a barbecue flavor but I guess that is okay. The grasshoppers bodies are dehydrated and crunchy. Despite the idea of this making sense, I had the conception that there would be less crunch. Unfortunately, I do not think I will buy grasshoppers again. Perhaps I will get mealworms or crickets, something will more substance and not simply the hollow shell. Anyway, hoped this helped anyone who was considering what a small facet of the future may be like. Have a nice day. 

 

Kind regards,

Trevor

 

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#103
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I've been to Scout Summer camp where they were selling edible crickets(or grasshoppers, I don't remember which).  I just remember them basically tasting like nothing.  It was like a crunchy plain taste.  The weirdest thing was the leg that got stuck in my teeth.


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#104
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Blockchain systems are tracking food safety and origins

 

https://theconversat...-origins-106491

 

Introduction:

 

(The Conversation) When a Chinese consumer buys a package labeled “Australian beef,” there’s only a 50-50 chance the meat inside is, in fact, Australian beef. It could just as easily contain rat, dog, horse or camel meat – or a mixture of them all. It’s gross and dangerous, but also costly.

 

Fraud in the global food industry is a multi-billion-dollar problem that has lingered for years, duping consumers and even making them ill. Food manufacturers around the world are concerned – as many as 39 percent of them are worried that their products could be easily counterfeited, and 40 percent say food fraud is hard to detect.

 

In researching blockchain for more than three years, I have become convinced that this technology’s potential to prevent fraud and strengthen security could fight agricultural fraud and improve food safety. Many companies agree, and are already running various tests, including tracking wine from grape to bottle and even following individual coffee beans through international trade.

 

Tracing food items

 

An early trial of a blockchain system to track food from farm to consumer was in 2016, when Walmart collected information about pork being raised in China, where consumers are rightly skeptical about sellers’ claims of what their food is and where it’s from. Employees at a pork farm scanned images of farm inspection reports and livestock health certificates, storing them in a secure online database where the records could not be deleted or modified – only added to.

 

As the animals moved from farm to slaughter to processing, packaging and then to stores, the drivers of the freight trucks played a key role. At each step, they would collect documents detailing the shipment, storage temperature and other inspections and safety reports, and official stamps as authorities reviewed them – just as they did normally. In Walmart’s test, however, the drivers would photograph those documents and upload them to the blockchain-based database. The company controlled the computers running the database, but government agencies’ systems could also be involved, to further ensure data integrity.

 

file-20181116-194509-l5d5hx.jpg?ixlib=rb

Government inspectors review processing plants for safe handling practices.

 U.S. Department of Agriculture


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#105
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I ate bugs. They poisoned me. Can I have seconds now?

 

https://theweek.com/...ave-seconds-now

 

Extract:

 

(The Week) BugsGiving was the centerpiece of this year's Brooklyn Bugs Festival, which took place over the span of three days at the Brooklyn Kitchen. I only attended the single event, which aimed to "highlight dishes that reimagine Thanksgiving using edible insects as the primary source of protein." Overseeing the festivities was Brooklyn Bugs' charismatic maestro, Chef Joseph Yoon, and his partner for the evening, Chef David George Gordon, who wore a toque blanche adorned with antennae.

 

...In 80 percent of countries, people eat insects, with more than 1,600 different species making their way past some 2 billion people's lips. Thinking it's gross to eat insects is North American prissiness; if I lived in Central or South America, Africa, Asia, or parts of Oceania, it wouldn't have been such a big deal. That being said, I don't think those parts of the world are exactly eating the "cricket gougères" and "haricots verts with roasted beets and chapulines" featured on our BugsGiving menu. That part was all Brooklyn.

 

Still, it's a little surprising that eating bugs hasn't caught on in the U.S. yet. Researchers at Oxford found that 100 grams of bugs has more protein, calcium, and vitamins than 100 grams of chicken or steak. Crickets specifically have 12 times as much vitamin B12 as salmon. Insect oil is thought to be a healthy source of elusive omega-3 fatty acid. Cockroaches could be the next superfood!

 

Insects are also absurdly sustainable and have little impact on the environment. In a landmark report in 2013, the United Nations proposed bugs as a promising remedy to food scarcity, a crisis that will only balloon with climate change.

 

…I only realized later that it might have been my vegetarianism that did me in. Because bugs are up to 75 percent protein, my guts were rebelling: "Making radical changes to one's diet is going to throw the digestive system for a loop, at least in the beginning," confirms More. And while nibbling lobster has previously made me queasy for hours, I hadn't put my reaction together with the shellfish allergy warning on the bottom of every menu. In other words, stuffing yourself full on BugsGiving is perhaps not the wisest way to reintroduce meat into your diet.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#106
bgates276

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Hmm, yeah, but don't insects also carry bacteria, microorganisms and such, making them not such a good source of nutrition? Yes, I suppose if they were farmed specifically for eating, it may not be a problem, but I don't think I would risk it anyways. I think I would have to be Venezuela style desperate to even consider it. 



#107
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Funkervogt found this article and started a whole thread on the topic in the News and Discussion forum.  I thought it would also make a nice addition to the collection of articles that I have put in this thread.

 

 

Hatcheries using SELEGGT process

 

http://www.seleggt.c...-of-shell-eggs/

 

Extract:

 

(SELEGGT) The SELEGGT process will bring about many changes to the internal processes at the hatcheries.

 
The hatching eggs are firstly put into the setter. Here, they are bred for nine days. On day nine, the hatching eggs are candled to check if they are fertilised or not. The fertilized hatching eggs are then subjected to the SELEGGT process to identify the gender.
 
The rejected male hatching eggs and infertile eggs will be turned into high-value feed.
 
The female hatching eggs are returned to the setter, where they continue to incubate until the 18th day. After this, they are moved to the hatcher. This way, only female chicks hatch after three further days of incubation.
 
After the young hens have been reared, they are sent to layer farms as usual and begin the laying period. These eggs can now be sold with the added quality “No chick culling” – thanks to gender identification in the egg.
 
en_chain_2.jpg

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#108
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You Can Now Be Fined and Jailed for Calling This “Meat”

 

https://www.motherjo...ling-this-meat/

 

 

(Mother Jones) By the 3rd century, Chinese cooks had found that soy milk could be curdled to create a meat replacement known as tofu. Nearly two millennia later, the Gardenburger hit shelves, followed by the vegetar­ian’s answer to Thanksgiving: Tofurky. Now you can buy faux-blood-oozing patties with a texture eerily similar to the real thing. And lab-grown meat may show up in stores before you know it: Memphis Meats, a company trying to perfect beef and chicken from animal cells, counts billionaire Bill Gates and agriculture corporation Cargill as investors. Meanwhile, the environmental impacts of livestock are becoming clear: A major 2018 report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change blamed animal products for three-quarters of food-related greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Although only 6 percent of Americans say they’re vegetarian, around a quarter of consumers polled by Nielsen in 2017 said they wanted more plant-based proteins on the shelves. Retail sales of meat substitutes in the United States grew 30 percent from 2014 to 2016, and they are expected to rise by 74 percent over current levels by 2023, to about $2.5 billion, according to research firm Euromonitor Inter­national. While that’s still piddling compared with the $200 billion in products sold by US meat companies each year, the success of these substitutes appears to have come as a threat to livestock producers.

 

This is especially true in Missouri, where legis­lators enacted a new statute to limit how companies use the word “meat” on food labels or in advertisements.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#109
caltrek

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Here’s What the USDA’s New Nutrition Rules Mean for the 30 Million Children Eating School Lunches

 

https://www.motherjo...s-sonny-perdue/

 

Introduction:

(Mother Jones) Earlier this month, the US Department of Agriculture issued new nutrition standards for school lunches that make it easier for schools to offer less healthy meals to students.

 

The new rules significantly dilute the high standards set by the Obama administration’s 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, which required that federally subsidized school lunch programs provide meals that meet certain nutrition standards: for instance, bread that is whole-grain rich, flavored milk that is nonfat, and lower levels of sodium across the board. Those standards were meant to address growing health concerns for children across the United States, including rising levels of obesity. The changes announced earlier this month undo the whole grain, nonfat milk, and sodium rules set by former President Barack Obama.

 

Rolling back healthy lunch standards has long been a priority for USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue, who in 2017 announced that his department was looking at the lunch rules. Perdue, a former Georgia governor and a supporter of chocolate milk, said in a statement last year that schools should have more control over the kind of food they serve in cafeterias. 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#110
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Study Finds 1 in 10 Americans Have a Food Allergy

 

https://www.courthou...a-food-allergy/

 

Introduction:

(Courthouse News) – More than 1 in 10 Americans have a food allergy, while twice as many claim they have one when they actually don’t, a new survey published on Friday discovered.

 

Almost 11 percent of U.S. adults, about 26 million, have some sort of food allergy, with some 12 million estimated to not appear until adulthood, according to research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

 

The survey, conducted for nearly a year, asked 40,443 U.S. adults if they had any food allergies. Of those who said they did; only 48 percent said they received a medical diagnosis for the allergy from a doctor, 38 percent said they had to go to the emergency room due to their allergy and only 25 percent said they had a prescription for EpiPen.

 

“Nearly twice as many adults think that they are allergic to foods, while their symptoms may suggest food intolerance or other food related conditions,” lead researcher Dr. Ruchi Gupta, pediatrics professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine said in a written statement. “It is important to see a physician for appropriate testing and diagnosis before completely eliminating foods from the diet.”

 

The survey asked respondents to describe their symptoms of their food allergy in order to determine if it was real. Researchers looked for the most common reactions the body takes in response to an allergen: vomiting, chest pain, breathing problems, hives, throat tightening, low blood pressure, fast heartbeat, trouble swallowing, swelling of the mouth or tongue or chest tightening. Other reports such as diarrhea or an itchy sensation was considered not to be an allergy and more likely a food sensitivity.

peanuts-allergies.jpg?w=1140&ssl=1


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#111
caltrek

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Reclaiming lost calories: Tweaking photosynthesis boosts crop yields

 

https://theconversat...p-yields-109283

 

Extract:

(The Conversation) I work on an international project called Realizing Increased Photosynthetic Efficiency (RIPE)…. We are boosting harvests by increasing the efficiency of photosynthesis – the solar-powered process that plants use to turn carbon dioxide and water into greater crop yields. In our most recent publication, we show one way to increase crop yield by up to 40 percent by rerouting a series of chemical reactions common to most of our staple food crops.

 

Photorespiration costs a lot of energy

 

Two-thirds of the calories we consume across the globe come directly or indirectly from just four crops: rice, wheat, soybean and maize. Of these, the first three are hindered by a photosynthetic glitch. Typically the enzyme that captures carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, called Rubisco, converts carbon dioxide into sugar and energy. But in one out of every five chemical reactions, Rubisco makes a mistake. The enzyme grabs an oxygen molecule instead. Rather than producing sugars and energy, the chemical reaction yields glycolate and ammonia, which are toxic to plants. To deal with this problem, plants have evolved an energy-expensive process called photorespiration that recycles these toxic compounds. But toxin recycling requires so much energy that the plant produces less food.

 

Photorespiration uses so much energy that some plants, like maize, as well as photosynthetic bacteria and algae, have evolved mechanisms to prevent Rubisco’s exposure to oxygen. Other organisms, like bacteria, have evolved more efficient ways to remove these toxins.

 

These natural solutions have inspired many researchers to try to tweak photorespiration to improve crop yields. Some of the more efficient naturally occurring recycling pathways have been genetically engineered in other plants to improve growth and photosynthesis in greenhouse and laboratory conditions. Another strategy has been to modify natural photorespiration and speed up the recycling.

 

These direct manipulations of photorespiration are crucial targets for future crop improvement. Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption boosts photosynthesis, allowing the plant to use more carbon.

file-20190102-32139-1ecd0o9.jpg?ixlib=rb

In the process of photosynthesis, carbon dioxide and water are transformed into sugars and oxygen. Sunlight powers this chemical reaction.

BlueRingMedia/Shutterstock.com


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#112
caltrek

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The article linked below discusses use of CRISPR to increase the fruit size of groundcherry plants:

 

https://theconversat...-editing-105801


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#113
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In the future, there will be less dairy consumption in most wealthier countries (we're already starting to see this trend in North America and parts of Europe) as its wide range of negative effects (mental illnesses, autoimmune diseases, etc...) become more well known.

 

Because drinking an infant formula as an adult from the tits of another species (a fluid which evolved to bond a baby to its mother) is a lot more than just strange.



#114
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Apparently all food is dangerous to our bodies. Heck, just by living we're slowing destroying ourselves, thanks to oxidization. Ha!


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#115
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Apparently all food is dangerous to our bodies. Heck, just by living we're slowing destroying ourselves, thanks to oxidization. Ha!

We need to solve that problem quickly! Stop being a physicist and switch to biology! 


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The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#116
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We have to understand what “food” really is. Perhaps the problem is that what we think is food is not actually so. What does your body tell you?



#117
Alislaws

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Given how long and hard the process has been to get people to limit smoking, and to reduce fat, sugar and salt etc. I'd expect dairy to continue being consumed in large quantities for at least a couple of decades even after scientist have proved to everyone that it is very harmful.

 

Might be being optimistic but I hope we are producing clean beef by that time anyway and can create a similar process to produce milk (and edit the milk to remove harmful components)



#118
caltrek

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How African scientists are improving cassava to help feed the world

 

https://www.nature.c...586-019-00014-2

 

Introduction:

(Nature) “I like this one,” says Ismail Rabbi, placing his palm on a cassava plant and smiling coyly, like a parent picking favourites. “It doesn’t look impressive — it’s not tall,” he says, “but it beats all the obstacles we throw at it.”

 

Rabbi, a geneticist at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) in Ibadan, Nigeria, and his colleagues are on a mission to improve cassava (Manihot esculenta). Also known as yuca or manioc, its starchy roots provide food and income to more than 800 million people worldwide. In Africa, where consumption is highest, cassava plants bear smaller yields than their cousins in Asia and South America. But African varieties tend to be more tolerant of blights, such as the deadly cassava mosaic disease now spreading across Asia.

 

In November, Rabbi shipped five varieties of African cassava that resist the disease to Thailand, the world’s largest cassava exporter. He and his colleagues created the plants under the auspices of the US$62-million Next Generation Cassava Breeding project, which the UK government and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched in 2011. Project scientists are using genomic data to identify useful traits for breeding cassava varieties that will suit the world’s needs — safeguarding against starvation as the climate warms, populations grow and viruses spread.

 

When the African plants reach Thailand, scientists there will cross them with cassava varieties adapted to Asia. Then they will screen the resulting offspring for genetic markers that Rabbi and his colleagues use to predict a plant’s resistance to mosaic viruses, along with 12 other traits — such as leaf colour and the amount of edible starch in each root.

 

These genetic markers have helped the researchers in Nigeria to breed eight types of cassava that are now growing at test plots across the country. Scientists and farmers will compare them with the best existing cassava varieties in wide use.

d41586-019-00014-2_16380922.jpg

A farmer transports cassava roots to Iwo, a small town in Nigeria's Osun state, for processing.

Credit: Amy Maxmen


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#119
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I enjoyed the idea that people think in the future food will become more simplistic, or consumerist, when in reality, the culinary arts as we know it as a modern phenomenon. Hundreds of years ago, before the Colombian exchange, food was much more simplistic. Like mushrooms today, the white mushrooms that everyone eats, was "made" in 1926.

 

Honestly, with genetic engineering advances and more versatility in aquaculture, I expect food to become even more variable and interesting than before.


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#120
caltrek

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WeWork Gets Into Food Business

 

https://techcrunch.c...laird-hamilton/

 

Introduction:

 

(TechCrunch) WeWork CEO Adam Neumann has been described as an avid surfer, one who has been known to grab his board and go, both in the Hamptons in Long Island, where he reportedly owns a home, as well as in Hawaii.

 

Maybe it’s no surprise, then, that WeWork is now also investing in a so-called superfood company that was created several years ago by big wave surf star Laird Hamilton, who Neumann was apparently surfing alongside just last week. In a video call with Neumann on Monday, a Fast Company reporter noted that Neumann is currently sporting a cast on one of his fingers, having broken it during the outing.

 

How much WeWork is investing in the startup, Laird Superfood, is not being disclosed, but according to the food company, the money will be used to fuel product development, acquisitions and to hire more employees. A press release that was published without fanfare earlier today also notes that Laird Superfood products will be made available to WeWork members and employees at select locations soon.

 

Some of those offerings are certainly interesting, including “performance mushrooms” that it says “harnesses the benefits” of Chaga, a fungus believed by some to stimulate the immune system; Cordyceps, another fungus that’s been used for kidney disorders and erectile dysfunction; and Lion’s Mane, yet another fungus believed by some to stimulate nerve growth in the brain.

 

The company suggests adding one teaspoon of the mushrooms each day to one’s coffee, tea or health shake.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Food, CRISPR, GMO, Gene Modification, Agriculture

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