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The Future of Food

Food CRISPR GMO Gene Modification Agriculture

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105 replies to this topic

#101
kjaggard

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Study: More People Will Eat Bugs if They’re Up-Marketed as Luxury Item

 

Also more people will eat bugs if they are ground into a fine powder (high in protein!) and no bug images are used on any of the packaging. 

 

 

Right now I am searching on the internet where I can purchase insects to eat. There is high potential for insects as a protein alternative to the unsustainable meat industry; I am considering and probably will soon begin eating insects. It would be a plus if they were ground into a fine powder but I would not mind consuming them whole. I will report on how this goes and I am interesting to at least try it out. My conception of this currently is that I will feel like one of our ancestors...a varied diet of nuts and seeds (I eat a lot of these), some meat, many fruits and vegetables, and now a healthy load of insects. 

 

have you checked out: http://www.crunchycr...edible-insects/

 

once you have a sense of what and how to eat with insects, depending on your region of the world you could likely farm your own supply. Crickets, mealworms, and black soldier fly larva/pupa are all farmable. Though crickets getting out and infesting the building, and black soldier flies complicated mating needs make meal worms the best choice.


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#102
Enter Ataraxia

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have you checked out: http://www.crunchycr...edible-insects/

 

once you have a sense of what and how to eat with insects, depending on your region of the world you could likely farm your own supply. Crickets, mealworms, and black soldier fly larva/pupa are all farmable. Though crickets getting out and infesting the building, and black soldier flies complicated mating needs make meal worms the best choice.

 

 

 

Hello everyone, hope things are going well. Recently, my insects-for-consumption arrived and I am going to share with you the experience. Also, kjaggard, I have checked out Crunchy Critters, but did not purchase anything from them. Suboptimal research was performed on part; impatience was prevalent and I simply purchased some barbecue grasshoppers from Amazon. Though I intended to buy crickets, I eventually ended up getting grasshoppers. The experience goes as follows: grasshoppers arrive in the student mailroom, I open the container and put one or two in mouth, someone sees me and looks away fast, I walk back to my dorm and eat a few more. Honestly, I have not eaten too many of them because they taste like the smell of rat food, kind of like rotten cellulose matter. There is no semblance of a barbecue flavor but I guess that is okay. The grasshoppers bodies are dehydrated and crunchy. Despite the idea of this making sense, I had the conception that there would be less crunch. Unfortunately, I do not think I will buy grasshoppers again. Perhaps I will get mealworms or crickets, something will more substance and not simply the hollow shell. Anyway, hoped this helped anyone who was considering what a small facet of the future may be like. Have a nice day. 

 

Kind regards,

Trevor

 

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#103
rennerpetey

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I've been to Scout Summer camp where they were selling edible crickets(or grasshoppers, I don't remember which).  I just remember them basically tasting like nothing.  It was like a crunchy plain taste.  The weirdest thing was the leg that got stuck in my teeth.


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#104
caltrek

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Blockchain systems are tracking food safety and origins

 

https://theconversat...-origins-106491

 

Introduction:

 

(The Conversation) When a Chinese consumer buys a package labeled “Australian beef,” there’s only a 50-50 chance the meat inside is, in fact, Australian beef. It could just as easily contain rat, dog, horse or camel meat – or a mixture of them all. It’s gross and dangerous, but also costly.

 

Fraud in the global food industry is a multi-billion-dollar problem that has lingered for years, duping consumers and even making them ill. Food manufacturers around the world are concerned – as many as 39 percent of them are worried that their products could be easily counterfeited, and 40 percent say food fraud is hard to detect.

 

In researching blockchain for more than three years, I have become convinced that this technology’s potential to prevent fraud and strengthen security could fight agricultural fraud and improve food safety. Many companies agree, and are already running various tests, including tracking wine from grape to bottle and even following individual coffee beans through international trade.

 

Tracing food items

 

An early trial of a blockchain system to track food from farm to consumer was in 2016, when Walmart collected information about pork being raised in China, where consumers are rightly skeptical about sellers’ claims of what their food is and where it’s from. Employees at a pork farm scanned images of farm inspection reports and livestock health certificates, storing them in a secure online database where the records could not be deleted or modified – only added to.

 

As the animals moved from farm to slaughter to processing, packaging and then to stores, the drivers of the freight trucks played a key role. At each step, they would collect documents detailing the shipment, storage temperature and other inspections and safety reports, and official stamps as authorities reviewed them – just as they did normally. In Walmart’s test, however, the drivers would photograph those documents and upload them to the blockchain-based database. The company controlled the computers running the database, but government agencies’ systems could also be involved, to further ensure data integrity.

 

file-20181116-194509-l5d5hx.jpg?ixlib=rb

Government inspectors review processing plants for safe handling practices.

 U.S. Department of Agriculture


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#105
caltrek

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I ate bugs. They poisoned me. Can I have seconds now?

 

https://theweek.com/...ave-seconds-now

 

Extract:

 

(The Week) BugsGiving was the centerpiece of this year's Brooklyn Bugs Festival, which took place over the span of three days at the Brooklyn Kitchen. I only attended the single event, which aimed to "highlight dishes that reimagine Thanksgiving using edible insects as the primary source of protein." Overseeing the festivities was Brooklyn Bugs' charismatic maestro, Chef Joseph Yoon, and his partner for the evening, Chef David George Gordon, who wore a toque blanche adorned with antennae.

 

...In 80 percent of countries, people eat insects, with more than 1,600 different species making their way past some 2 billion people's lips. Thinking it's gross to eat insects is North American prissiness; if I lived in Central or South America, Africa, Asia, or parts of Oceania, it wouldn't have been such a big deal. That being said, I don't think those parts of the world are exactly eating the "cricket gougères" and "haricots verts with roasted beets and chapulines" featured on our BugsGiving menu. That part was all Brooklyn.

 

Still, it's a little surprising that eating bugs hasn't caught on in the U.S. yet. Researchers at Oxford found that 100 grams of bugs has more protein, calcium, and vitamins than 100 grams of chicken or steak. Crickets specifically have 12 times as much vitamin B12 as salmon. Insect oil is thought to be a healthy source of elusive omega-3 fatty acid. Cockroaches could be the next superfood!

 

Insects are also absurdly sustainable and have little impact on the environment. In a landmark report in 2013, the United Nations proposed bugs as a promising remedy to food scarcity, a crisis that will only balloon with climate change.

 

…I only realized later that it might have been my vegetarianism that did me in. Because bugs are up to 75 percent protein, my guts were rebelling: "Making radical changes to one's diet is going to throw the digestive system for a loop, at least in the beginning," confirms More. And while nibbling lobster has previously made me queasy for hours, I hadn't put my reaction together with the shellfish allergy warning on the bottom of every menu. In other words, stuffing yourself full on BugsGiving is perhaps not the wisest way to reintroduce meat into your diet.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#106
bgates276

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Hmm, yeah, but don't insects also carry bacteria, microorganisms and such, making them not such a good source of nutrition? Yes, I suppose if they were farmed specifically for eating, it may not be a problem, but I don't think I would risk it anyways. I think I would have to be Venezuela style desperate to even consider it. 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Food, CRISPR, GMO, Gene Modification, Agriculture

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