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The Future of Food

Food CRISPR GMO Gene Modification Agriculture

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#161
shin_getter

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When the dreamtime ends (return of malthuian limits) happens, the notion that a data processing unit needs to be powered via multiple immensely complex chemical processes that can only be run by delicate nanobots with single percent efficiency at each stage would be considered immensely wasteful.

 

Unless that current scarcity of human-level intelligence relative to other factors of production holds, I do not see food as we know it holding another 1000 years outside of signaling/status, when modification to enable healthy intake of more cost efficient energy source is surely possible within the time frame.



#162
caltrek

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^^^ Given your timeframe of 1,000 years, who knows?

 

In the meanwhile, looking at shorter timeframes:

 

"This Might Be The Year Of Famine For Us": Declining Catch Worries Fishers In Southern Karnataka

https://thelogicalin...karnataka-19840

 

Introduction:

 

(The Logical Indian)

·        Declining fish catch since August 2019 has triggered a wave of worry amongst fishers across the economic spectrum in southern Karnataka.

·        Climate change, unsustainable and unregulated fishing methods have both been blamed for this decline.

·        Small-scale fishers are the most affected, and are now seeking support from the government.

 

January 18th, 2020. It is a hot Saturday afternoon in Sasihithlu, a small fishing village in southern Karnataka. At 12:30 PM, the sun is directly above us, glaring through a largely cloudless sky. Surya Salian, 62, gathers his cast net for a final throw. He enters the still blue water until it is waist-high. He swings his arm and throws the circular net. It forms a shimmering translucent circle in the air for a few seconds, then drops into the water. After a few minutes, he pulls it out. It has one small fish, a silver biddy, wriggling. He throws it on the white sand, next to three other fish caught a short while ago.

January 19th, 2020. It is balmy and breezy at 4 AM in the Arabian Sea. A purse seiner, a big boat that goes out about 15 nautical miles into the ocean to catch Indian oil sardines, is ready to head out. Most of the crew on the ship is from Odisha, Jharkhand and Andhra Pradesh. They left because their land did not offer them a living, and they arrived here, on the west coast, in south Karnataka, working on big fishing boats, hoping for a better life. After six hours, the ship returns, empty-handed. The crew members earn nothing for the day.

 

Since August 2019, fishers across the spectrum, from the small-scale ones to owners of giant trawlers, echo a similar lament. There are no fish in the ocean. Although the official fish catch data for 2019-2020 will be released only after March 2020, officials from Central Marine Fisheries of India (CMFRI) have confirmed that there has been a significant decline in fish catch since the post-monsoon season.
 

The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#163
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An emerging virus is killing farmed fish, but breeders can help them fight back

 

https://www.sciencem...them-fight-back

 

Introduction:

(Science) About a decade ago, farm-raised tilapia in Israel began to die mysteriously. The fish had ulcerated skin and internal hemorrhages; sometimes ponds full of fish were wiped out. In 2014, researchers identified the culprit: a previously unknown virus they named tilapia lake virus. Since then, the virus has been detected on farms in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. There’s no cure and no vaccine, and the virus is likely spreading, threatening one the world’s most important farmed fish. “It’s a major global problem,” says John Benzie, a geneticist at WorldFish, an international publicly funded research center.

 

New findings, however, are providing hope that Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), the most common kind of farmed tilapia, could be bred to resist the virus. In a lucky break, in 2018 the virus struck a pond at WorldFish holding numerous tilapia produced for breeding experiments, and some of the fish proved completely resistant to the virus, Benzie and colleagues reported last month in Aquaculture. “It’s good news for the tilapia sector,” says Morten Rye, a fish geneticist at Benchmark Genetics, a company that breeds tilapia and other aquacultural species.

 

Tilapia is the second most popular fish in aquaculture, after carp, with farmers in more than 120 countries now harvesting about 6 million tons per year. It’s especially important in developing nations, many of which rely on a productive strain first developed in the 1990s at WorldFish.

 

The emerging virus affects several types of farmed tilapia, and was probably causing problems for at least several years before its discovery. Although researchers know some regions have been hit hard, the overall distribution and impact of the virus are not clear. Very few countries have reported data to the World Organisation for Animal Health, which requires member nations to immediately notify it of all outbreaks of tilapia lake virus and other emerging diseases. “We really need descriptive and analytical epidemiological studies to help us understand the situation in the field,” says Mona Dverdal Jansen, a veterinary epidemiologist at the Norwegian Veterinary Institute.

ca_0306NID_Tilapia_online.jpg?itok=AHNra

Farm-raised tilapia at a market in Africa, where growers have had outbreaks of a damaging fish virus.

WORLDFISH/FLICKR/CC BY-NC-ND


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#164
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Scientists Say Quarter of All Pigs Could Die of Swine Fever

 

https://www.courthou...of-swine-fever/

 

Some potentially good news on that issue:

 

China closes in on vaccine for deadly pig virus

 

https://www.nature.c...586-020-00742-w

 

Introduction:

 

(Nature) Researchers in China have developed an experimental vaccine that can protect pigs for life from a lethal virus that has decimated its pig population — the world’s largest — over the past 18 months. But virologists say the team still need to carry out clinical trials and large-scale vaccine production.

 

There is no available cure or vaccine for the highly contagious African swine fever, a haemorrhagic disease that leads to almost certain death in infected pigs, but does not harm humans.

 

“A vaccine is desperately needed for the resumption of pig production in China,” says Bu Zhigao, a virologist at Harbin Veterinary Research Institute in China. Bu co-authored a paper on the experimental vaccine that was published earlier this month in Science China Life Sciences1.

 

China is determined to invest unlimited resources in vaccine development, says Bu. The country has suffered huge economic losses as a result of the virus — China’s pig population of more than 440 million has been reduced by 40% since the virus first appeared in the northeastern city of Shenyang in August 2018 — although the outbreak seems to be under control now, says Bu.

 

Virologists say that the Chinese team has gone further than any other group in testing the safety and efficacy of a vaccine. The data look promising, says Daniel Rock, a virologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#165
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About Genetically Engineered Foods

 

https://www.centerfo.../about-ge-foods

 

 

(Center for Food Safety) The genetic engineering of plants and animals is looming as one of the greatest and most intractable environmental challenges of the 21st Century.

 

Currently, up to 92% of U.S. corn is genetically engineered (GE), as are 94% of soybeans and 94% of cotton [1] (cottonseed oil is often used in food products). It has been estimated that upwards of 75% of processed foods on supermarket shelves – from soda to soup, crackers to condiments – contain genetically engineered ingredients.

 

By removing the genetic material from one organism and inserting it into the permanent genetic code of another, the biotech industry has created an astounding number of organisms that are not produced by nature and have never been seen on the plate. These include potatoes with bacteria genes, “super” pigs with human growth genes, fish with cattle growth genes, tomatoes with flounder genes, corn with bacteria genes, and thousands of other altered and engineered plants, animals and insects. At an alarming rate, these creations are now being patented and released into our environment and our food supply.

A Question of Risk

 

A number of studies over the past decade have revealed that genetically engineered foods can pose serious risks to farmers, human health, domesticated animals, wildlife and the environment. Despite these long-term and wide-ranging risks, Congress has yet to pass a single law intended to manage them responsibly. The haphazard and negligent agency regulation of biotechnology has been a disaster for consumers and the environment. Unsuspecting consumers by the tens of millions are purchasing and consuming unlabeled GE foods, despite a finding by U.S. Food & Drug Administration scientists that these foods could pose serious risks.

 

Center for Food Safety seeks to halt the approval, commercialization and/or release of any new genetically engineered crops until they have been thoroughly tested and found safe for human health and the environment. CFS maintains that any foods that already contain GE ingredients must be clearly labeled, and advocates for the containment and reduction of existing genetically engineered crops.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#166
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https://www.youtube....h?v=rEkc70ztOrc


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#167
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While some point to the risk of genetically engineered food crops, other see it as a way to address such problems as the negative impacts of global warming.  Case in point:

 

Rice genetically engineered to resist heat waves can also produce up to 20% more grain

 

Introduction:

(Science) As plants convert sunlight into sugar, their cells are playing with fire. Photosynthesis generates chemical byproducts that can damage the light-converting machinery itself—and the hotter the weather, the more likely the process is to run amok as some chemical reactions accelerate and others slow. Now, a team of geneticists has engineered plants so they can better repair heat damage, an advance that could help preserve crop yields as global warming makes heat waves more common. And in a surprise, the change made plants more productive at normal temperatures.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#168
caltrek

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In relation to a theme of the linked video:

 

Pork Producers Lose Challenge to California’s Farm Animal Confinement Initiative

 

https://www.courthou...ent-initiative/

 

Introduction:

 

SAN DIEGO (CN) — Pork producers’ challenge to a voter-approved law requiring pigs raised for consumption and sold in California to have space to move around before they are slaughtered was struck down by a federal judge Monday.

 

U.S. District Judge Thomas Whelan, dismissed without prejudice the lawsuit by the National Pork Producers Council and the American Farm Bureau Federation, finding the farm trade groups failed to allege Proposition 12 violates the Commerce Clause of the Constitution.

 

He gave the groups two weeks to file an amended complaint.

 

The groups claimed Proposition 12, approved by state voters in 2018 and set to go into effect Dec. 31, violates the Commerce Clause of the Constitution by regulating extraterritorially, or inflicting burdens on interstate commerce.

 

The law regulates the production of veal, pork and eggs and forbids the sale of pork meat from hogs born of sows not housed in conformity with the law’s “stand-up-turn-around requirements.”

AP20111639030516.jpg?resize=1024%2C684

Berkshire hogs rest in a pen.

(AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#169
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To Prevent the Next Pandemic, We Need Meaningful Oversight of Animal Agribusiness

 

https://www.commondr...al-agribusiness

 

Extract:

(Common Dreams) The WHO has said that the first human case of SARS-CoV-2 probably came from a bat, through an unidentified intermediate animal who was then handled by humans. A likely venue for this transmission was a "wet market" in China, where various species of animals come in close contact with each other and with the humans slaughtering them. We were warned about bats carrying the next SARS pandemic in 2013

 

We've also been warned about the risk that bird flu outbreaks in poultry flocks worldwide pose for the next human pandemic. Among the most concerning of the avian influenza is H7N9, a pathogen with a 40% fatality rate. The vast number of crowded, stressed animals held captive on US factory farms presents ample opportunities for pathogens to practice spreading directly from animal to animal, and indirectly through flies, rodents, manure, and workers moving between barns. It is even possible for aerosolized pathogens to spread between barns miles away through the air. 

 

 

One would hope that an industry that presents such an enormous potential threat to public health would take its food safety responsibility seriously. But it doesn't, and seems to be doing everything it can to demonstrate that. Privatizing safety inspections for the purpose of increasing line speeds at slaughterhouses has been a joint goal of the meat industry and the USDA for decades, despite the risk it poses to food safety. Even though faster line speed makes the process much harder on the animals and on workers, and means more carcasses to inspect for safety in less time, the industry pushes for it in the name of profit. Incredibly, the USDA is approving faster line speeds right now

 

 

Earlier this month, a line speed waiver was given to Foster Farms, which has a history of producing salmonella-contaminated chicken linked to outbreaks in 29 states. As of last Friday, the Food Safety Inspection Service is no longer issuing waivers, because they're proposing a blanket cap increase for all plants. The fast line speeds are the reason that workers at slaughter plants can't socially distance at work, making one of the most hazardous, low-paid jobs in the country even more dangerous.

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#170
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Plant-based alternatives to meat find new markets during coronavirus pandemic

 

https://www.washingt...ew-markets-dur/

 

Extract:

(Washington Times) Sales of plant-based meat alternatives are widening and finding new markets during the coronavirus pandemic, as concerns mount over health and safety issues at food-processing plants and a potential meat shortage.

 

“We are seeing an explosion of products and public acceptance to plant-based meat alternatives,” Sheril Kirshenbaum, co-director of the Michigan State University Food Literacy and Engagement Poll, told The Washington Times.

 

“We’ve had vegetarian alternatives for meat as far back as the Song dynasty … but this new generation [of products] is really being designed to taste and smell and feel in your mouth like meat,” Ms. Kirshenbaum said, referring to the Chinese family that ruled from 960 to 1279.

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#171
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Demand for meatless meat is skyrocketing during the pandemic

 

https://www.vox.com/...e-burger-beyond

 

Introduction:

 

(Vox) Retail sales of plant-based food are taking off during the coronavirus pandemic. The last time I braved the grocery store, which was a few weeks ago, I unwittingly illustrated two of the main reasons why.

 

First, I went in search of eggs. The store was all out, but right above the shelf where I usually find them, I spied a bottle of Just Egg, the plant-based substitute made out of beans. I’d never had eggless eggs before, but now, out of necessity, I decided to try something new.

 

Then I walked through the meat aisle. There was still plenty of beef and chicken to be had — but given that a live-animal market in China may have given rise to Covid-19 and that the giant factory farms that supply 99 percent of America’s meat are a pandemic risk too, meat just seemed very unappealing in that moment. Instead, I grabbed a package of Beyond Meat and went home.

 

These two factors — spot shortages of animal products in stores and a growing awareness of the problems with our animal agriculture system — are likely driving an increase in retail sales of plant-based meat products during the pandemic. According to a recent Nielsen report, demand for these products has increased 278 percent since this time last year.

 

Impossible Foods announced Tuesday that because demand for the Impossible Burger has “skyrocketed among home chefs,” the company is accelerating its retail expansion this week, rolling out the burgers at 1,700 Kroger-owned grocery stores nationwide.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#172
caltrek

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United States relaxes rules for biotech crops

 

https://www.sciencem...s-biotech-crops

 

Introduction:

(Science) A major change to U.S. regulation of biotech will exempt some gene-edited plants from government oversight. The new policy, published in the Federal Register today, also calls for automatic approval of variations of established kinds of genetically modified (GM) crops, easing their path to market.

 

Industry groups are welcoming the new rule, whereas opponents are decrying the reduction of government oversight.

 

Conclusion:

…Some groups are concerned that companies won’t have to notify USDA of biotech crops they will bring to market that are exempt from regulation. “The result is that government regulators and the public will have no idea what products will enter the market and whether those products appropriately qualified for an exemption from oversight,” Gregory Jaffe of the Center for Science in the Public Interest said in a statement.

 

The Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO), a major trade group, appeared to encourage companies make public such releases. “BIO encourages increased openness about products entering the marketplace,” it said in a statement.

 

Most of the new changes will go into effect on 5 April 2021.

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#173
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I discovered something the other day at a Dunkin Donuts, which I ate at for breakfast:  they now have a "beyond sausage" plant-based breakfast sandwich.  I tried it, and it's pretty good, at least for fast food (which I don't normally eat).

 

Little by little, restaurants are adopting more meatless options.



#174
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Preventing Food Waste Technology

 

https://techcrunch.c...and-katy-perry/

 

Extract:

(Tech Crunch) Food waste and the pressures on the global food supply chain wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic have captured headlines around the world, and one small startup based in the coastal California city of Santa Barbara has just announced $250 million in financing to provide a solution.

 

The company is called Apeel Sciences and over the past eight years it’s grown from a humble startup launched with a $100,000 grant from the Gates Foundation to a giant, globe-spanning company worth more than $1 billion and attracting celebrity backers like Oprah Winfrey and Katy Perry as well as large multi-national investors like Singapore’s sovereign wealth fund.

 

What’s drawn these financiers and the fabulously famous to invest is the technology that Apeel has developed which promises to keep food fresh for longer periods on store shelves, which prevents waste and (somewhat counterintuitively) encourages shoppers to buy more vegetables.

 

…In practice, once a company agrees to try out Apeel’s technology it installs the company’s treatment systems at the back end of its supply chain where all of their vegetable deliveries come in to be shipped to various locations, according to (Apeel Sciences founder and chief executive James) Rogers.

 

A single run of Apeel’s system can treat 10,000 kilograms of food in an hour, Rogers said. So far this year, Apeel is on track to treat 20 million pieces of fruit with its coatings, the company said. 

 

 

Avocado-Diagram_1.jpg

 

Apeel adds a layer of plant-derived protection to the surface of fresh produce to slow water loss and oxidation — the factors that cause spoilage.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#175
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Almonds Are Out. Dairy Is a Disaster. So What Milk Should We Drink?

 

https://getpocket.co...should-we-drink

 

(Get Pocket.com) For environmentally minded consumers, the news is hard to swallow: almond milk is not healthy for the planet and the popular milk substitute is especially hard on bees. Our recent investigation into the connection between California’s industrialized almond industry and a record 50bn commercial bee deaths created quite a buzz. The widely read story prompted one primary response from readers: “What should we be drinking instead?”

 

This is a thorny question, and food sustainability experts are reluctant to single out any one plant milk as best because all have pros and cons.

 

But we’re going to try.

 

One thing is clear. All milk alternatives are far better for the planet than dairy. A 2018 study by researchers at the University of Oxford showed that producing a glass of dairy milk results in almost three times more greenhouse gas emissions than any plant-based milk and it consumes nine times more land than any of the milk alternatives. (Land is required to pasture the cows and grow their feed, which the animals belch out in the form of methane.)

Plant milks discussed in linked article:

 

Coconut

Almond

Rice

Hazelnut

Hemp and Flax

Soy

Oat


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#176
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Portobel Turns Food Producers Into Direct-To-Consumer Business

 

https://techcrunch.c...06/05/portobel/

 

Introduciton:

 

(TechCrunch) A startup called Portobel is working to help food producers shift their businesses so they can support direct-to-consumer deliveries.

 

Portobel  is backed by Heroic Ventures and led by Ranjith Kumaran, founder or co-founder of file-sharing company Hightail (acquired by OpenText) and loyalty startup PunchTab (acquired by Walmart Labs).

 

Kumaran told me that he and his co-founders Ted Everson and Itai Maron started out with the goal of improving the delivery process by using low-cost, internet-connected devices to track each order. As they began testing this out — primarily with dairy companies and other producers of perishable goods — customers started to ask them, “Hey, you can monitor these things, can you actually deliver these things, too?”

 

So last year, the company started making deliveries of its own, which involved managing its own warehouses and hiring its own drivers. Kumaran said the resulting process is “a machine that turns wholesale pallets into direct-to-consumer deliveries.”

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#177
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As Climate Change Makes Growing Seasons Less Predictable, Scientists Dig Into A Novel Approach to Boosting Crop Resilience

 

https://www.futureti...-of-food/page-9

 

Extract:

(Ensia) Sally Mackenzie spent her childhood summers walking through the vast fields of bright, red, ripe tomato crops: They grow best in the heat of her home state of California. Yet recent seasons prove it can get too hot for a tomato.

 

…Increasingly unpredictable growing seasons are a threat to income and livelihoods not only in California, where rising temperatures coupled with scarce precipitation have taken a nearly US$3 billion toll on the state’s agricultural industry, but also around the world. Now Mackenzie is working to do something about that. As producers and scientists search for ways to make crops more resilient in the face of such challenges, she sees promising potential in tapping into plants’ natural ability to rapidly turn select genes on and off in response to stress.

 

Best of Both Worlds

 

Traditionally, plant breeders have used selective breeding to create high-yielding varieties that can thrive under different growing conditions. However, there’s often a trade-off between breeding for yield potential and yield stability, says Nathan Springer, a geneticist who studies maize at the University of Minnesota. It’s possible to breed a plant that’s very drought tolerant, he says. But in a year where there isn’t any drought, this breed of plant may “only yield half as much.”

 

Both Mackenzie and Springer are interested in the role that epigenetic mechanisms — the biological processes that activate and deactivate genes — may play in this dynamic balance between yield potential and yield stability. If breeders could enhance plants’ ability to flip the switch as environmental conditions change, it could make it possible to (for instance) activate physiological changes that enhance drought tolerance only when needed, avoiding the ding on productivity.

 

…Mackenzie’s “trick” is to use RNA interference to silence a gene called MSH1, which is found in the plant cell’s plastid — a compartment that has the ability to sense stress. She and her colleagues discovered that when they suppress MSH1 in a parent plant, epigenetic regulation kicks in, and gene expression is altered in a way that allows it to better respond to stress.

 

Advantages of this approach discussed in the remaining article include a faster result than that of using standard breeding methods.  Also, no DNA foreign to the plant is used, so a lengthy approval process through the U.S. Department of Agriculture is avoided.

 

Casava is another crop to which they are looking to apply this technique.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#178
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While this next article probably would be more appropriate for the Culture, Economics & Politics of the Future forum, it also fits the theme of this thread.  So, rather than create a whole new thread in the other forum for just one article, I will post it here.

 

Federal Judge Mulls Genetically Modified Salmon

 

https://www.courthou...odified-salmon/

 

Introduction:

(Courthouse News) — Unimpressed with the environmental assessment the Food and Drug Association used to approve a new breed of genetically modified salmon destined for the American dinner table, a federal judge looked poised Tuesday to rule in favor of environmental groups afraid of its potential to blunt wild salmon populations.

 

At a hearing Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Vincent Chhabria said he’s concerned that AquaBounty, the biotech company behind the GMO salmon, might use the FDA’s finding of “no significant impact” to expand the program without realizing its full impact on local ecology. 

 

AquaBounty plans to breed its “AquAdvantage” salmon — a genetic mix of ocean pout and Pacific Chinook — at its hatchery in Rollo Bay on Prince Edward Island, then transport the eggs for growth at its Indiana farm site. That is, if litigation doesn’t stand in the way. 

 

AquaBounty’s salmon, touted for its abnormally high growth rate, marks the first time the FDA has allowed a genetically modified animal to be raised and sold for food. 

Salmon.jpg?resize=800%2C533&ssl=1

Chinook salmon after being unloaded at Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco.

(AP Photo/Eric Risberg)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#179
kjaggard

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Almonds Are Out. Dairy Is a Disaster. So What Milk Should We Drink?

 

https://getpocket.co...should-we-drink

 

(Get Pocket.com) For environmentally minded consumers, the news is hard to swallow: almond milk is not healthy for the planet and the popular milk substitute is especially hard on bees. Our recent investigation into the connection between California’s industrialized almond industry and a record 50bn commercial bee deaths created quite a buzz. The widely read story prompted one primary response from readers: “What should we be drinking instead?”

 

This is a thorny question, and food sustainability experts are reluctant to single out any one plant milk as best because all have pros and cons.

 

But we’re going to try.

 

One thing is clear. All milk alternatives are far better for the planet than dairy. A 2018 study by researchers at the University of Oxford showed that producing a glass of dairy milk results in almost three times more greenhouse gas emissions than any plant-based milk and it consumes nine times more land than any of the milk alternatives. (Land is required to pasture the cows and grow their feed, which the animals belch out in the form of methane.)

Plant milks discussed in linked article:

 

Coconut

Almond

Rice

Hazelnut

Hemp and Flax

Soy

Oat

that article seems to in part operate from some degree of the natural is better fallacy. and sounds like the creator  (based in part about how they refer to certain things) may be a vegan... which is fine if they wanna be, but it tends to come with a fair bit of bias and make for less reliable sources.

 

But I will say that hemp and soy and flax I can see as potential winners because they are fast growers with other things the plant pproduces that are useful, they consume co2 to grow as fast as they do and I'm not sure about hemp/flax, but soy helps nitrogen levels in the soil which fertalizes for other plants.

 

I'm not sure why nobody does a more multi source blended milk substitue.

 

you can make milk alternatives at home easily enough.

 

oat milk is terrible. you can get something similar by putting twice as much water in oatmeal as you need and draining that off with two spoonfuls of oatmeal into a blender. or even easier in putting a bunch of cheerios in water in the fridge over night, stir and strain the solids. That is pretty much what it tastes like.


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caltrek

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^^^Thank you for the comment:

 

The linked article below is a bit longer than articles I usually post. Still, it has a lot of interesting information if aquaculture is something you enjoy reading about.

 

New genetic tools will deliver improved farmed fish, oysters, and shrimp. Here’s what to expect

 

https://www.sciencem...imp-here-s-what

 

Introduction:

(Science) Two years ago, off the coast of Norway, the blue-hulled Ro Fjell pulled alongside Ocean Farm 1, a steel-netted pen the size of a city block. Attaching a heavy vacuum hose to the pen, the ship’s crew began to pump brawny adult salmon out of the water and into a tank below deck. Later, they offloaded the fish at a shore-based processing facility owned by SalMar, a major salmon aquaculture company.

 

The 2018 harvest marked the debut of the world’s largest offshore fish pen, 110 meters wide. SalMar’s landmark facility, which dwarfs the typical pens kept in calmer, coastal waters, can hold 1.5 million fish—with 22,000 sensors monitoring their environment and behavior—that are ultimately shipped all over the world. The fish from Ocean Farm 1 were 10% larger than average, thanks to stable, favorable temperatures. And the deep water and strong currents meant they were free of parasitic sea lice.

 

Just a half-century ago, the trade in Atlantic salmon was a largely regional affair that relied solely on fish caught in the wild. Now, salmon farming has become a global business that generates $18 billion in annual sales. Breeding has been key to the aquaculture boom. Ocean Farm 1’s silvery inhabitants grow roughly twice as fast as their wild ancestors and have been bred for disease resistance and other traits that make them well suited for farm life. Those improvements in salmon are just a start: Advances in genomics are poised to dramatically reshape aquaculture by helping improve a multitude of species and traits.

cs_1120_NF_Fish_lead2.jpg?itok=UUI3SD1N

After years of breeding, Atlantic salmon grow faster and larger than their wild relatives.

HENDRIX GENETICS


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Food, CRISPR, GMO, Gene Modification, Agriculture

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