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Retail Apocalypse (2016-Present)

retail Amazon Sears Target store chains economy business middle America mall retailers

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35 replies to this topic

#21
Yuli Ban

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Retail Apocalypse: 23 big retailers closing stores

Some of the United States’ most prominent retailers are shuttering stores in recent months amid sagging sales in the troubled sector.
The rise of ecommerce outlets like Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) has made it harder for traditional retailers to attract customers to their stores and forced companies to change their sales strategies. Many companies have turned to sales promotions and increased digital efforts to lure shoppers while shutting down brick-and-mortar locations.

  • Abercrombie & Fitch
  • Aerosoles
  • American Apparel
  • BCBG
  • Bebe
  • Bon-Ton Stores Inc.
  • The Children’s Place
  • CVS
  • Foot Locker
  • Guess
  • Gymboree
  • Hhgregg
  • J. Crew
  • J.C. Penney
  • The Limited
  • Macy’s
  • Michael Kors
  • Payless
  • RadioShack
  • Rue21
  • Sears/Kmart
  • Toys R Us
  • Wet Seal

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#22
Yuli Ban

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The Ticking Time Bomb for Suburban Retail

Thanks largely to the rise of e-commerce, chains like Macy’s, Toys “R” US, and Best Buy are shuttering faster than analysts predicted even a year ago, with at least 24 major retailers planning store closures in 2018.
According to some forecasters, there’s an even larger retail apocalypse on the horizon. As overbuilt malls, corporate mergers, and autonomous vehicles converge, “the ingredients are in place for major disruption,” said Rick Stein, the founder of Urban Decision Group, a Columbus, Ohio-based planning consulting firm.
Speaking on a panel in Portland, Oregon, on Monday, Stein made the case for which commercial areas will suffer most from new consumer habits mingling with technology: car-oriented suburban retail.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#23
Yuli Ban

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High-street stores in greater danger than during the 2008 financial crisis

The corporate health monitoring group analysed the accounts of 54,000 retail companies and said that 23,000 of them, 44 per cent, received ratings that put them in the “red zone” or warning area.
 
Separately, property advisor Altus Group claims that more than 55,000 individual shops face above inflation tax hikes in their business rates next month.
 
The warnings follow the high-profile collapses of Toys R Us and gadget shop Maplin, which between them employed 5,500, and fashion retailer New Look using a company voluntary agreement, an insolvency procedure aimed at preventing businesses from going bust, to shut 60 of its 593 stores.
 
Analysis from Company Watch found that small retailers were particularly at risk, with 61 per cent receiving low health scores, compared to 36 per cent of large to medium-sized retailers.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#24
Yuli Ban

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Foot Locker is closing 110 stores as the retail apocalypse rages on

  • Foot Locker announced on Friday that it plans to close approximately 110 stores this year.
  • The retailer has been a victim of the retail apocalypse, closing 147 stores in 2017.
  • "The disruption that has characterized the retail industry recently is not going away," Foot Locker CEO Richard Johnson said Friday.

And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#25
Yuli Ban

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The American retail apocalypse in photos

58d3e30c112f7043268b6184-750-563.jpg

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59b0262579bbfd22008b895b-750-584.png

 

Wow, that's... melancholic in a way.


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#26
caltrek

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Amazon Doesn’t Just Want to Dominate the Market—It Wants to Become the Market

 

https://www.thenatio...ome-the-market/

 

Introduction:

 

(The Nation) Chris Lampen-Crowell started to feel the undertow four years ago. Gazelle Sports, the running-shoe and apparel business he founded in downtown Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 1985, had grown steadily for decades, adding locations in Grand Rapids and Detroit and swelling to some 170 employees. But then, in 2014, sales took a downward turn. From the outside, at least, it was hard to see why. Gazelle Sports was as beloved as ever by local runners. People continued to flock to its free clinics and community runs. And scores of enthusiastic reviews on Google and Yelp, along with an industry ranking as one of the best running-shoe retailers in the country, gave Gazelle Sports and its e-commerce website plenty of prominence in online searches.

 

The problem wasn’t so much that customers had made a conscious decision to buy their running gear elsewhere, Lampen-Crowell says. Rather, a number were doing more of their overall shopping on Amazon—and as the online giant became a pervasive, almost unconscious habit in their lives, they had started dropping into their Amazon shopping carts some of the items they used to buy from Gazelle Sports. Lampen-Crowell’s initial response was to double down on marketing his company’s own website. But while that helped, there were many potential customers who still had little chance of landing on it. That was because, by 2014, nearly 40 percent of people looking to buy something online were skipping search engines like Google altogether and instead starting their product searches directly on Amazon.

 

By the fall of 2016, the share of online shoppers bypassing search engines and heading straight to Amazon had grown to 55 percent. With sales flagging and staff reductions under way, Lampen-Crowell made what seemed like a necessary decision: Gazelle Sports would join Amazon Marketplace, becoming a third-party seller on the digital giant’s platform. “If the customer is on Amazon, as a small business you have to say, ‘That is where I have to go,’” Lampen-Crowell explains. “Otherwise, we are going to close our doors.”

 

Amazon-cornering_img.jpg


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#27
Alislaws

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Imagine using all those malls for something other than endless buying of pointless disposable stuff though. 

 

Imagine what an excellent school or community centre you could make out of that derelict shopping mall pictured above. 


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#28
Yuli Ban

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z3OEMT2.png

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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#29
Yuli Ban

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This is the real story of American retail

Forget all the “retail apocalypse” headlines. The phrase suggests the whole industry is collapsing, consulting firm Deloitte says. In reality, it’s not.
But it is changing in significant and fundamental ways. In an in-depth study conducted over more than a year, Deloitte dug into what’s really going on in the industry, which employs millions of Americans and accounts for an important share of the country’s GDP. It examined the large-scale changes happening in the US economy, polled a representative sample of 2,000 consumers, and even laid out all public US retailers along a value spectrum for its analysis.
There’s no apocalypse, Deloitte found, but there is a “renaissance” of sorts going on.

QYIC9MS.png


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#30
Raklian

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This is the real story of American retail

Forget all the “retail apocalypse” headlines. The phrase suggests the whole industry is collapsing, consulting firm Deloitte says. In reality, it’s not.
But it is changing in significant and fundamental ways. In an in-depth study conducted over more than a year, Deloitte dug into what’s really going on in the industry, which employs millions of Americans and accounts for an important share of the country’s GDP. It examined the large-scale changes happening in the US economy, polled a representative sample of 2,000 consumers, and even laid out all public US retailers along a value spectrum for its analysis.
There’s no apocalypse, Deloitte found, but there is a “renaissance” of sorts going on.

 

 

 

This mirrors the growing socioeconomic chasm between the poor and the wealthy.


What are you without the sum of your parts?

#31
wjfox

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Half of America's shopping malls are expected to close by 2030 –

 

https://www.futureti...ping-malls-2030


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#32
wjfox

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Carpetright and Mothercare shares dive on trading worries

 

Shares in Carpetright and Mothercare have plunged amid fears about the retailers' futures.

Carpetright slumped 14% after a report suggested it would cut jobs and close stores as part of a rescue plan to stop it going into administration.

Mothercare, which is in the midst of a store closure programme, fell almost 12%.

It comes amid a wider High Street slowdown that has seen a host of big businesses shut stores or go bust.

At the weekend, the Sunday Times reported that Carpetright could go down the route of a company voluntary arrangement (CVA), which would allow to it to shut loss-making stores and secure deep discounts on rental costs.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-43458476


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#33
Alislaws

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QYIC9MS.png

 

You could just post that straight to r/latestagecapitalism, no need for any title or caption. 



#34
Yuli Ban

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NpWClmM.jpg


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#35
caltrek

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An After the Apocalypse Autopsy

 

https://ourfuture.or...history-tell-us

 

To fully appreciate the "autopsy" you should read the full story linked above.  If I still haven't grabbed your interest, then at least see if this extract does the job:

 

Extract:

 

(OurFuture.org) Charles Lazarus, a World War II veteran who learned the retail trade helping customers in his father’s Washington, D.C. bike shop. In the years right after the war, Lazarus realized that all his veteran friends were settling down and raising families. Products for kids, Lazarus figured, had a great future, and in 1948 the budding 25-year-old entrepreneur opened a storefront outlet for children’s furniture.

 

…Lazarus would retire from Toys “R” Us in 1994 an enormously wealthy man. He had company at the top. The Reagan tax cuts for the rich had concentrated a huge chunk of America’s wealth at the upper reaches of the nation’s economic summit.

 

…In reality, Wall Street’s financial engineers — the kingpins of “private equity” — did not parlay the fortunes of America’s lightly taxed rich into prosperity for all. They instead used the investment dollars the rich provided to buy up struggling publicly traded companies and take them private. Their basic gameplan: “fix” the companies and then take them back to Wall Street and make a killing going back public.

 

But the companies the private equity firms took private typically found themselves stuck paying off the debt the private equity kingpins incurred buying them up. The new private equity overlords would, in turn, try to cover that debt by cutting costs, often by putting the axe to worker pay and benefits.

 

This “fix” sometimes worked. In other cases, the companies continued to struggle. Either way, the private equity managers won. If no windfall materialized on Wall Street, they would still walk away with millions in management fees.

 


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#36
Yuli Ban

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Sears is closing 72 more stores

The list of store closings is due to be announced mid-day Thursday. Sears said it identified 100 non-profitable Sears and Kmart stores and picked 72 for closure "in the near future."
The company closed a total of nearly 400 stores during the past 12 months, and now has a total of 894 left, including the 72 slated for closure. The two chains had a total of 3,500 U.S. stores between them when they merged in 2005.
Sears said overall revenue fell 31% in the three months ending May 5. While most of that decline was due to previous store closings, sales fell 12% at the stores that remained open.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: retail, Amazon, Sears, Target, store chains, economy, business, middle America, mall, retailers

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