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PlayStation 5 – News and Discussions

Sony PlayStation PlayStation 4 PlayStation 5 gaming console consoles next generation

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#41
bgates276

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The question I have is, what if the novelty wears off faster than the technology can improve? I think that  is especially true of niche items, and has been the problem with 3d tv's. I also see is it happening with VR. However, in all fairness, one example of VR's performance from the past is not enough to establish a  definite pattern, so I guess I will also wait and see before drawing any firm conclusions. I am rather skeptical though.

 

I should also mention that while I have not tried PSVR, I did try Sony's HMZ-T1 movie viewer HMD at the Sony store. It looked pretty damn cool in the commercials, and I was actually considering buying one over a TV. However, after trying it out, I recognized all the practical problems with it. Despite that being in 2011, I really don't see the technology changing substantially in the greater scheme of things, over that period of time. As I was saying, this may be a compelling purchase in a few decades. As it is, I think myself and a lot of other people see better ways to spend their money.



#42
Alislaws

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I think the issue with dismissing VR as a novelty that will fade in time is that it implies that (long term) VR doesn't add anything significant to the games or experiences you're enjoying. 

 

I find the difference between playing a game on a screen and being immersed in a virtual world to be a huge change, and I'm fairly sure that the majority of games that are successful today would be better, more enjoyable experiences if recreated in VR. This is not the case with things like 3D TV where movies and games are only rarely improved by 3d effects.

 

Honestly I am not sure VR movies (aside from XXX movies) will really catch on. So if your main use for VR would be watching films I can see why you'd be sceptical (and the analogy to 3dTVs makes perfect sense) VR takes control of the camera away from the director and puts it in the hands of the viewer, which isn't usually going to improve things. The director has a pretty good idea where they want you looking at a specific scene, and you staring 180 degrees in the other direction is not going to improve your experience.

 

A made for VR movie will probably be something very different from the normal movie experience, more of a series of scenes to explore maybe? But you wont be getting movies released as both VR movies and regular ones without one version being awkward and bad.

 

(unless they make 2 separate movies)

 

I'm not recommending you run out and buy one now unless you're an enthusiastic gamer, but I think long term VR will eclipse PC and console gaming almost completely


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#43
bgates276

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Oculus founder: "No existing or imminent VR hardware is good enough to go mainstream"

 

https://www.gamesind...ruly-mainstream

 

"I want to take this a step further and make a bold claim: No existing or imminent VR hardware is good enough to go truly mainstream, even at a price of $0.00," Luckey continued. "You could give a Rift+PC to every single person in the developed world for free, and the vast majority would cease to use it in a matter of weeks or months.

 

And this is exactly what I was saying. I honestly think the tech is going to go back into the shadows again, for at least another decade. 



#44
wjfox

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AMD Gonzalo APU in PS5, Xbox Next May Feature Navi Graphics, Zen Cores
 
January 22, 2019
 
AMD hasn’t formally announced that it has won the Xbox Next and PlayStation 5 contracts just yet, but it’s considered a more-or-less foregone conclusion in the industry. Now, noted hardware leaker TUM_APISAK has released a Tweet he claims identifies and unveils AMD’s Gonzalo APU — or at least, what its specifications claim about the chip.
 
Point of clarification. The CPU he compares with (ZD3601BAM 8 8 F4 _ 40/36 _Y is the engineering sample product number for a six-core Ryzen CPU that surfaced before Ryzen 2nd Generation had formally launched).
 
As the tweet illustrates, the combined implication of the data is for a chip with a 1.6GHz base clock, eight CPU cores, and 8MB of L3 cache. Bradd Sams, executive editor at Thurrott, has claimed that Microsoft’s Xbox Scarlett will use an AMD Zen 2 chip on the 7nm node, while the amount of L3 on this core (8MB) is closer to what Zen used. There are claims that the boost CPU clock will be as high as 3.2GHz.
 
As far as CPU architecture and process node are concerned, the question breaks down like this: 7nm seems incredibly likely, given that the node should be fully mature by then and Navi is debuting on that process. Whether the chip will use Zen+ or Zen 2 architecture is an interesting question. AMD could go the chiplet route here, or it might not.
 
Either way, the PS5 and Xbox Next will pack serious improvements in overall CPU performance.
 
 
 
3dUG1BK.jpg

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#45
Alislaws

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Is that better than currently available desktop PC processors? 

 

(the ones for £200-£500, not the crazy £1000+ ones)



#46
starspawn0

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Take-Two CEO Says Next-Generation Consoles Could Achieve Photorealistic Graphics

https://www.gameinfo...listic-graphics

With both new consoles in that phase where they have been technically announced but we haven't really seen anything in terms of software yet, we're still left guessing on how powerful the Project Scarlett and what will presumably be called the PlayStation 5 might actually be. Take-Two's CEO, Strauss Zelnick, has presumably seen these new consoles and has come away impressed by their visual fidelity. The head of one of the world's most profitable game publishers thinks that next year's consoles might push games to a photorealistic milestone.


Interview here:

https://www.cnbc.com...tml?jwsource=cl

He mentions the photorealism stuff near the end of the video.
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#47
wjfox

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^ I think we're still a couple of generations away from true photorealism, although it's already been achieved for certain textures/environments. Facial animations and bodily movements still need a bit of work.



#48
Erowind

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Retina displays for larger screens won't be around until we start pushing at minimum 16k resolutions I imagine. Even then the textures, models, animations and physics still need work on top of pushing that many pixels. 

 

With that said I think we've already reached the generation of games were graphics don't really matter that much anymore. Indie devs and small development studios regularly put out things that are aesthetically more pleasing with more simplistic graphics (but still beyond ps3 level) than the highest budget AAA games now a days. Even then I think I prefer the look of the non-photorealistic AAA games too. Games that come to mind for me are Nier Automata and the new Nintendo games.  

 

Graphics are still super important for VR though and the tech has a long way to go before we get the best VR experiences.



#49
Yuli Ban

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^ I think we're still a couple of generations away from true photorealism, although it's already been achieved for certain textures/environments. Facial animations and bodily movements still need a bit of work.

What you're referring to is realistic physics. And yes, that's a big gap between where we are and pure simulated realism all because physics (and AI) can still be described as "dearly lacking." However, photorealism to me has always been a distinctly visual thing— regardless of how things behave in motion, if I see a screenshot of something, does it look like a photo from real life? Lighting is the biggest bottleneck towards photorealism, hence why raytracing seems so impressive.


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#50
starspawn0

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There are new tools available, that weren't even about 1 year ago. One of these is to use a neural net to "clean up" a rendered scene. The idea I've seen people propose is to do a low-complexity ray-trace of a scene, which will be grainy; and then to use Deep Learning to clean it up. The end result is the ability to produce high-fidelity ray-trace scenes with 1/10 the compute budget -- or something like that. That's like the equivalent of several ticks of Moore's Law.

A similar idea is to use Deep Learning to fill-in semantic maps, as in this example:

Nvidia YouTube video

So, for example, you could apply this on top of the output from a game engine, which would need do only the most rudimentary rendering before being fed to the neural net, which would then make it look a lot more realistic.

At the moment, this technology is still experimental; but I've read that some videogame and platform companies are already using it. I think Epic Games is already using it in their products, for example, to do "Super Sampling" or Superresolution, leveraging Nvidia's work.

....

Deep Learning is also being used to improve upon animating characters -- e.g. making humans and other animate objects move in a more realistic way. There are also improvements to smoke, fabric, and fluid animation -- all thanks to applications of Deep Learning.

I'm not sure how far along the game companies are on this, but according to some Tweets I had seen from Alex Champandard, an expert on using DL in a gaming context, game companies are far ahead of other industries on the implementation side. Game companies try new approaches like these almost the second they become available.
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