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Dinosaurs and prehistoric life


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#21
Jessica

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Mnyamawamtuka: New dinosaur with heart-shaped tail provides evolutionary clues for African continent

February 13, 2019, Ohio University

 

The OHIO team identified and named the new species of dinosaur in an article published this week in PLOS ONE. The new dinosaur, the third now described from southwestern Tanzania by the NSF-funded team, is yet another member of the large, long-necked titanosaur sauropods. The partial skeleton was recovered from Cretaceous-age (~100 million years ago) rocks exposed in a cliff surface in the western branch of the great East African Rift System.

The new dinosaur is named Mnyamawamtuka moyowamkia (Mm-nya-ma-wah-mm-too-ka mm-oh-yo-wa-mm-key-ah), a name derived from Swahili for "animal of the Mtuka (with) a heart-shaped tail" in reference to the name of the riverbed (Mtuka) in which it was discovered and due to the unique shape of its tail bones.

 


Read more at: https://phys.org/new...ionary.html#jCp

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#22
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500-million-year-old worm 'superhighway' discovered in Canada

February 28, 2019, University of Saskatchewan


 

Prehistoric worms populated the sea bed 500 million years ago—evidence that life was active in an environment thought uninhabitable until now, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.

 

The sea bed in the deep ocean during the Cambrian period was thought to have been inhospitable to animal life because it lacked enough oxygen to sustain it.

But research published in the scientific journal Geology reveals the existence of fossilized worm tunnels dating back to the Cambrian period 270 million years before the evolution of dinosaurs.

The discovery, by USask professor Brian Pratt, suggests that animal life in the sediment at that time was more widespread than previously thought.

 

 



Read more at: https://phys.org/new...canada.html#jCp


#23
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Ancient extinct sloth tooth in Belize tells story of creature's last year

February 27, 2019, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Some 27,000 years ago in central Belize, a giant sloth was thirsty. The region was arid, not like today's steamy jungle. The Last Glacial Maximum had locked up much of Earth's moisture in polar ice caps and glaciers. Water tables in the area were low.

 

The sloth, a beast that stood up to 4 meters tall, eventually found water—in a deep sinkhole with steep walls down to the water. That is where it took its final drink. In 2014, divers found some of the sloth's remains—parts of a tooth, humerus and femur—while searching for ancient Maya artifacts in the pool, in Cara Blanca, Belize.

Though partially fossilized, the tooth still held enough unaltered tissue for stable carbon and oxygen isotope analysis, which provided clues to what the sloth ate in the last year of its life. This, in turn, revealed much about the local climate and environment of the region at the time. The findings, reported in the journal Science Advances, will aid the study of similar fossils in the future, the researchers said.

 



Read more at: https://phys.org/new...belize.html#jCp

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#24
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Ancient mammal remains digested by crocodiles reveal new species

March 4, 2019, Zoological Society of London

Capromyid or hutia fossils that were found digested by Cuban crocodiles, found in Queen Elizabeth II Botanic Park, Grand Cayman. Credit: New Mexico Museum of Natural History

Fossilised bones that appear to have been digested by crocodiles in the Cayman Islands have revealed three new species and subspecies of mammal that roamed the island more than 300 years ago.

 

An expert team led by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London), the American Museum of Natural History, and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History studied the bones from collections in British and American museums including the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida. The bones had been previously collected from caves, sinkholes and peat deposits on the Cayman Islands between the 1930s and 1990s.

 

 



Read more at: https://phys.org/new...reveal.html#jCp


#25
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Gigantic T. Rex Skeleton Found in Canada Is Officially World's Biggest

George Dvorsky
Yesterday 2:05pm Filed to: DINOSAURS


Updated measurements of a large fossil found in Saskatchewan nearly 30 years ago confirm it as the world’s largest known Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton. Remarkably, the new work suggests T. rex and other dinosaurs grew to a greater size than is typically appreciated.

New research published last week in The Anatomical Record describes “Scotty,” a T. rex skeleton otherwise known as specimen RSM P2523.8. Scotty is now officially the largest and most aged T. rex ever discovered, and the most gigantic of any of the known two-legged carnivorous dinosaurs known as theropods. At an estimated 19,555 pounds (8,870 kg), it’s also the biggest dinosaur ever discovered in Canada. The new study was led by paleontologist Scott Persons from the University of Alberta.

Scotty’s skeleton was discovered near Eastend, Saskatchewan in 1991, but work to remove it from the ground didn’t fully start until 1994. It took paleontologists nearly a decade to excavate the fossil because it was encased in compact, cement-like sandstone. The extra effort to excavate the bones, plus the sheer size of the specimen, resulted in further delays. That said, the paleontologists were able to recover around 65 percent of the T. rex specimen, which terrorized Cretaceous Canada some 66 million years ago.

Early attempts to characterize the skeleton between 2008 and 2014 were marred by inaccuracies owing to the fact that the fossil hadn’t been fully prepared for analysis. Consequently, and as Persons pointed out in the new study, Scotty “has never been formally described and its skeletal proportions scientifically quantified.” The new study is now the first to offer detailed and accurate measurements of the skeleton, including a comparative analysis with other known T. rex fossils.

-snip-

 

jhlc9biveexsiv9m0ftr.jpg
Read more: https://gizmodo.com/...ally-1833547406



#26
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First-confirmed occurrence of a lambeosaurine dinosaur found on Alaska's North Slope

by Heritage Daily 29, 2019

DINO11-1024x683.jpg




Paleontologists have discovered the first-confirmed occurrence of a lambeosaurine (crested ‘duck-billed’ dinosaur) from the Arctic – part of the skull of a lambeosaurine dinosaur from the Liscomb Bonebed (71-68 Ma) found on Alaska’s North Slope.
The bonebed was previously known to be rich in hadrosaurine hadrosaurids (non-crested ‘duck-billed’ dinosaurs).

The discovery proves for the first time that lambeosaurines inhabited the Arctic during the Late Cretaceous. In addition, the numeric abundance of hadrosaurine fossils compared to the lambeosaurine fossils in the marine-influenced environment of the Liscomb Bonebed suggests the possibility that hadrosaurines and lambeosaurines had different habitat preferences.

The paleontologists’ findings were published today in Scientific Reports, an open-access, multi-disciplinary journal from Nature Research dedicated to constructive, inclusive and rigorous peer review. The paper – entitled “The first definite lambeosaurine bone from the Liscomb Bonebed of the Upper Cretaceous Prince Creek Formation, Alaska, United States” – is co-authored by Yoshitsugu Kobayashi, Ph.D., and Ryuji Takasaki, of Hokkaido University, in cooperation with Anthony R. Fiorillo, Ph.D., of the Perot Museum of Nature and Science. Other authors are Ronald Tykoski, Ph.D. of the Perot Museum and Paul McCarthy, Ph.D., of the University of Alaska.

 


More:
https://www.heritage...th-slope/122938


#27
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New species of mastodon discovered in California

by Bob Yirka, Science X Network, Phys.org

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has discovered a new species of mastodon. In their paper uploaded to the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ, the group describes discovering the new species and why it has only just been found.

 

Mastodon were large animals that resembled modern elephants. They existed during parts of the Miocene and Pleistocene epochs, and were related to mammoths. They have been extinct for approximately 3000 years. Scientists have known of their existence for approximately 200 years—and they have been studied extensively, which makes the discovery of a new species very much a surprise.

 

https://phys.org/new...california.html



#28
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Ancient, four-legged whale with otter-like features found along the coast of Peru

by Cell Press
 

Cetaceans, the group including whales and dolphins, originated in south Asia more than 50 million years ago from a small, four-legged, hoofed ancestor. Now, researchers reporting the discovery of an ancient four-legged whale—found in 42.6-million-year-old marine sediments along the coast of Peru—have new insight into whales' evolution and their dispersal to other parts of the world. The findings are reported in the journal Current Biology on April 4.

 

The presence of small hooves at the tip of the whale's fingers and toes and its hip and limbs morphology all suggest that this whale could walk on land, according to the researchers. On the other hand, they say, anatomical features of the tail and feet, including long, likely webbed appendages, similar to an otter, indicate that it was a good swimmer too.

 

https://phys.org/new...e-features.html



#29
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Perfectly preserved dinosaur skin found in Korea

by University of Colorado Denver

Paleontologists are used to finding dinosaur bones and tracks. But remnants of soft tissue, like muscles or skin, are rare and often not well preserved. A very small percentage of tracks – much less than 1% – show skin traces.

 

Kyung-Soo Kim, Ph.D., of Chinju National University of Education recently found a set of very small tracks with perfect skin traces near Jinju City, Korea. CU Denver Professor Emeritus of Geology Martin Lockley, Ph.D., – with Kim, Jong Deock Lim of Korea and Lida Xing of Beijing – wrote a paper about the skin traces for the journal Scientific Reports. They described the skin as "exquisitely preserved."

 

https://phys.org/new...skin-korea.html



#30
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No image? Lame


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#31
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No image? Lame

 

 

Why won't you get off your lazy ass and open the fucking link?

 

Attack me and I'll attack you.



#32
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Perfectly preserved dinosaur skin found in Korea

by University of Colorado Denver

perfectlypre.jpg

Paleontologists are used to finding dinosaur bones and tracks. But remnants of soft tissue, like muscles or skin, are rare and often not well preserved. A very small percentage of tracks – much less than 1% – show skin traces.

 

Kyung-Soo Kim, Ph.D., of Chinju National University of Education recently found a set of very small tracks with perfect skin traces near Jinju City, Korea. CU Denver Professor Emeritus of Geology Martin Lockley, Ph.D., – with Kim, Jong Deock Lim of Korea and Lida Xing of Beijing – wrote a paper about the skin traces for the journal Scientific Reports. They described the skin as "exquisitely preserved."

 



#33
Yuli Ban

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No image? Lame

 

 

Why won't you get off your lazy ass and open the fucking link?

 

Attack me and I'll attack you.

There's no image of the purported dinosaur skin in the article.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#34
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Fossil proves hyenas once roamed Canada's Arctic Plains
4 hours ago

_107450419_8f29d435-a8cb-4f70-89b0-82110

A 50-year-old mystery surrounding a pair of fossilised teeth has been put to rest by new research that suggests hyenas once roamed Canada's Arctic.

A team of researchers have identified the teeth, which were found in the Yukon in the 1970s, as belonging to hyenas one million years ago.

Their findings were published on Tuesday in scientific journal Open Quaternary.

The discovery sheds new light on the evolution of the ferocious scavengers.

The two teeth were found during a paleontological expedition in Yukon's Old Crow Basin in 1973.

Indigenous explorers have been working with scientists to plumb the treasures of the region for over a century, says Grant Zazula, a palaeontologist with the Yukon government. But out of more than 50,000 specimen collected, only two that could belong to a hyena have been found.

 


More:
https://www.bbc.com/...canada-48682723

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#35
Jessica

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New carnivorous dinosaur brandished twice the toe claws of a velociraptor

12 hours ago

vespersaurus-1.jpg?auto=format%2Ccompres

 

As you probably remember from Jurassic Park, velociraptors (and similar dinosaurs) were known for the terrifying sickle-shaped claws on their toes. And that was just with one on each foot – a newly-discovered dinosaur from a related species was packing twice as many weapons. Vespersaurus paranaensis has been found to brandish two large claws on each foot, supporting itself on just one toe.

Terrible toenails aside, Vespersaurus may not have looked like too much of a threat. It's estimated that the dinosaur stood only 80 cm (31.5 in) tall, measured 1.6 m (5.2 ft) long and weighed just 15 kg (33 lb). Its vertebrae were packed with air-filled cavities like the bones of birds, making it light and probably pretty quick.

https://newatlas.com...dinosaur/60434/

 



#36
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May I introduce you splendid men and women of the world to,

 

ARGENTAVIS?

 

gryphon_by_katepfeilschiefter-d3fndg6.jp

 

No, wait.. that's a griffon.. TO:

 

ARGENTAVIS!

 

Argentavis-Magnificens.jpeg

 

Argentivis magnificens is quite possibly the biggest bird to ever fly, with its 6m wingspan and 70kg heft, she would have been a sight to behold before she swooped you into her lair and fed you to the kraken. 

 

She would have been a beauty. 

 

maxresdefault.jpg


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#37
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Sahara was home to some of largest sea creatures, study finds
 
Fri 12 Jul 2019 12.35 BST
 
Some of the biggest catfish and sea snakes to ever exist lived in what is today the Sahara desert, according to a new paper which contains the first reconstructions of extinct aquatic species from the ancient Trans-Saharan Seaway.
 
The sea was 50 metres deep and once covered 3,000sq km of what is now the world’s biggest sand desert. The marine sediment it left behind is filled with fossils which allowed the scientists who published the study to build up a picture of a region that teemed with life.
 
Between 100m and 50m years ago, today’s arid, boulder-strewn northern Mali “looked more like modern Puerto Rico”; the sun shone on some of the earliest mangroves, and mollusks lined the shallow seabed, according to Maureen O’Leary, the palaeontologist who led the study.
 
The study also formally named the geological units, literally putting the area on the geological map for the first time, showing how the sea ebbed and flowed over its 50m years of existence, and building up information about the K-Pg boundary, the geophysical marker of one of Earth’s five major extinction events, in which the non-avian dinosaurs became extinct.
 
With 1.6m catfish, 12.3m sea snakes and 1.2m pycnodonts – a type of bony fish, O’Leary and the other scientists developed the idea that in the late Cretaceous and early Paleogene period, the animals were experiencing gigantism.
 
 
 
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WVpwzSN.jpg

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#38
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Ancient 'Hyena-Pig' Discovered To Have Once Roamed Oregon
 


Oregon’s weirdest predator, the first of its kind in the state, was found in a museum drawer. A piece of it, anyway.

Hyena-pig. Murder-cow. With no modern analog, scientists have resorted to combinations of common animals to describe it. Dug up decades ago in the Hancock Mammal Quarry near John Day, Oregon, the bone from this prehistoric creature languished, misidentified in museum storage, until Selina Robson pulled it from its drawer.

Robson wasn’t looking for a murder-cow when she found the specimen. It was a fossilized jaw, slightly smooshed, and it was huge: about the length of her forearm. It was labeled “Hemipsaladon,” a type of creodont, which were large, bear-like predators that roamed Oregon 40 million years ago.

But Robson, at the time an undergrad student at the University of Oregon, had spent a lot of time looking at Hemipsaladon specimens, trying to identify one for a class assignment.

“I looked at it and said, ‘This doesn’t look right. This doesn’t look right at all,’” Robson said. She set it near her spot in the lab, mentally labeling it as “Weird Thing Found In A Closet” and left it there for a few months.

hemipsaladon_grandis_1562887256423.jpg

-snip-

Read more: https://www.opb.org/...chid-hyena-pig/



#39
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Strange new species of duck-billed dinosaur identified

by Taylor & Francis

 

The most complete skull of a duck-billed dinosaur from Big Bend National Park, Texas, is revealed in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology as a new genus and species, Aquilarhinus palimentus. This dinosaur has been named for its aquiline nose and wide lower jaw, shaped like two trowels laid side by side.

 

In the 1980s, Texas Tech University Professor Tom Lehman (then a Master's student) was conducting research on rock layers at Rattle Snake Mountain and discovered badly-weathered bones. He and two others from the University of Texas at Austin collected them, but some were stuck together making them impossible to study. Research in the 1990s revealed an arched nasal crest thought to be distinctive of the hadrosaurid Gryposaurus. At the same time, the peculiar lower jaw was recognized. However, the specimen spent additional years waiting for a full description and it was not until recent analysis that the researchers came to realize that the specimen was more primitive than Gryposaurus and the two major groups of duck-billed dinosaurs.

1-strangenewsp.jpg

https://phys.org/new...d-dinosaur.html


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#40
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Small horned dinosaur from China, a Triceratops relative, walked on two feet

by University of Pennsylvania

 

Many dinosaur species are known from scant remains, with some estimates suggesting 75% are known from five or fewer individuals. Auroraceratops rugosus was typical in this regard when it was named in 2005 based upon a single skull from the Gobi Desert in northwestern China. But that is no longer the case.

 

In the intervening years, scientists have recovered fossils from more than 80 individual Auroraceratops, bringing this small-bodied plant-eater into the ranks of the most completely known dinosaurs. It is now one of the few very early horned dinosaurs known from complete skeletons. In a collection of articles appearing as Memoir 18 in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology this week, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Gansu Agricultural University, and other institutions describe the anatomy, age, preservation, and evolution of this large collection of Auroraceratops.

 

smallhornedd.jpg

 

https://phys.org/new...riceratops.html


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