Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Dinosaurs and prehistoric life


  • Please log in to reply
68 replies to this topic

#41
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,421 posts

Remains of 'Herculean' parrot that was half the height of a human found in New Zealand

 

https://www.thenatio...ealand-1.895380

 

Introduction:

 

(The National) The remains of a supersized parrot that stood more than half the height of an average human and roamed the earth 19 million years ago have been discovered in New Zealand.

 

Judging by the size of the leg bones, the bird would have stood about one metre tall and weighed up to seven kilograms, a report by an international team of palaeontologists published in the latest edition of Biology Letters, said.

 

"It could have flown but we're putting our money on it being flightless," Paul Scofield, the senior curator of natural history at Canterbury Museum, told AFP on Wednesday.

 

When the bones were found in 2008 no one was certain what they were, and they spent 11 years gathering dust on a shelf until the team looked at them again earlier this year.

 

"The thought they were from a giant parrot did not enter our minds. We thought it could be some type of eagle until we went back and looked at it again," Scofield said.

 

NZEALAND-SCIENCE-ANIMAL-PARROT.jpg?f=16x

 

 

A drawing by Dr Brian Choo featuring the giant-sized Parrot.

AFP / Flinders University / Dr Brian Choo


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#42
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts

Human-sized penguin fossil discovered in New Zealand

New species said to have been four times heavier than emperor penguin

Patrick Barkham
@patrick_barkham
Wed 14 Aug 2019 08.53 EDT

5466973_081419-wabc-giant-penguin-img.jp

An illustration shows the approximate height of a giant penguin next to a woman. Photograph: Canterbury Museum/AP

A giant penguin that stood as tall as a person has been identified from fossil leg bones discovered by an amateur palaeontologist on New Zealand’s South Island.

At 1.6 metres and 80kg (12st), the new species, Crossvallia waiparensis, was four times as heavy and 40cm taller than the emperor penguin, the largest living penguin.

The penguin joins other oversized but extinct New Zealand birds including the world’s largest parrot, an eagle with a three-metre wingspan, 3.6 metre-tall moa birds and other giant penguins.

Enormous penguins are believed to have rapidly evolved in the Palaeocene epoch – between 66 and 56m years ago – after the dinosaurs disappeared and large marine reptiles also vanished from southern hemisphere waters that were much warmer than today.

 


More:
https://www.theguard...-in-new-zealand

CRAZY



#43
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts
Genetic study implicates humans in demise of prehistoric cave bear
AUGUST 15, 2019 / 9:03 AM / 2 DAYS AGO

Will Dunham
3 MIN READ


WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Genetic research that reconstructed the past population dynamics of the cave bear, a prominent prehistoric denizen of Europe, implicates Homo sapiens rather than climate cooling in the Ice Age extinction of these brawny plant-loving beasts.

Scientists said on Thursday they obtained genome data from 59 cave bears from bones unearthed at 14 sites in France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Serbia, Spain and Switzerland.

Using this, they detected a population downturn roughly 50,000 years ago coinciding with the arrival of our species in eastern Europe and then a dramatic decline starting about 40,000 years ago coinciding with the spread of Homo sapiens throughout Europe. It ultimately went extinct about 20,000 years ago.

The cave bear (scientific name Ursus spelaeus) was one of the charismatic inhabitants of Ice Age Europe alongside animals like the cave lion, woolly rhino, woolly mammoth and steppe bison. It was as big as a polar bear but strictly herbivorous. Firmly in the consciousness of humans in Europe, the bear was depicted in prehistoric cave paintings.

There has been a scientific debate about whether a cooling climate doomed the bears by reducing vegetation central to their diet or whether it was human encroachment including hunting and taking over the caves where the bears hibernated and gave birth.

 


More:
https://in.reuters.c...r-idINKCN1V51EL


#44
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts

Almost all life on Earth was wiped out 2 billion years ago, a new study says

By Scottie Andrew, CNN
Updated 0402 GMT (1202 HKT) September 5, 2019


(CNN) — The most catastrophic wipe-out on Earth didn't happen to the dinosaurs.

A new study found extreme changes in the atmosphere killed almost 100% of life on Earth about 2 billion years ago.

Researchers sampled barite, a mineral more than 2 billion years old, in subarctic Canada's Belcher Islands. Rocks that old "lock in chemical signatures," helpful clues for researchers to uncover what the atmosphere was like when the rocks first formed, co-lead author and Stanford University Ph.D. candidate Malcolm Hodgskiss told CNN.

There is such thing as too much oxygen

The study focused on a phenomenon called the "Great Oxidation Event." It goes like this: Billions of years ago, only micro-organisms survived on Earth. When they photosynthesized, they altered the chemical composition of the atmosphere, creating a glut of oxygen they ultimately could not sustain.

Micro-organisms exhausted the nutrients they needed to create oxygen, which knocked the Earth's atmosphere off-kilter. This led to an "enormous drop" in the biosphere -- the amount of life on Earth. Scientists weren't sure just how drastic the drop was until now.

-snip-

 


Read more: https://edition.cnn....trnd/index.html



#45
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts
Half-a-billion-year-old tiny predator unveils the rise of scorpions and spiders

by Royal Ontario Museum

Two palaeontologists working on the world-renowned Burgess Shale have revealed a new species, called Mollisonia plenovenatrix, which is presented as the oldest chelicerate. This discovery places the origin of this vast group of animals—of over 115,000 species, including horseshoe crabs, scorpions and spiders—to a time more than 500 million years ago. The findings are published in the prestigious journal Nature on September 11, 2019.

 

Mollisonia plenovenatrix would have been a fierce predator—for its size. As big as a thumb, the creature boasted a pair of large egg-shaped eyes and a "multi-tool head" with long walking legs, as well as numerous pairs of limbs that could all-together sense, grasp, crush and chew. But, most importantly, the new species also had a pair of tiny "pincers" in front of its mouth, called chelicerae. These typical appendages give the name to the group of scorpions and spiders, the chelicerates, which use them to kill, hold, and sometimes cut, their prey.

 

https://phys.org/new...-scorpions.html



#46
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts

Giant ice age kangaroos had massive cheekbones for crushing bites

11 September 2019
By Ruby Prosser Scully



Extinct giant kangaroos had skulls built to deliver the powerful crunch needed to eat tough food, such as branches and stems. This may have allowed them to survive long stretches of time when other food was scarce.

Short-faced kangaroos lived in Australia during the last ice age and are known for their short snouts, large jaws and teeth, and heavily built skulls.

D. Rex Mitchell at the University of New England, Australia, created a digital model of the skull of one type of short-faced kangaroo, the 120-kilogram Simosthenurus occidentalis, and analysed the effects of different biting behaviour.

He found that the giant kangaroo had teeth so close to the jaw joints that, if its cheek muscles were proportionate to the tree-kangaroo, a living relative, then the chances of its jaw dislocating were high.

 

-snip-

Read more: https://www.newscien...crushing-bites/

210512.jpg



#47
Erowind

Erowind

    Anarchist without an adjective

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,202 posts

/\ The feet on that Kangaroo are intense!



#48
wjfox

wjfox

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,136 posts
  • LocationLondon

aG3eOPO.jpg



#49
wjfox

wjfox

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,136 posts
  • LocationLondon

The Giant 'Egg Thief' - Gigantoraptor

 

Published on Sep 8, 2019

 

Oviraptorosaurs are an amazing group of dinosaurs, and there's one species, which grew to giant sizes, that has some particularly fascinating mysteries surrounding it.

 

https://youtu.be/H8tXN_3IE1g

 

 

n5mSPka.jpg



#50
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts
Fossilised partial skeleton of new flying reptile species found in Queensland

Pterosaur had four-metre wingspan, lived about 90m years ago and was capable of crossing continents

Ben Smee
@BenSmee
Thu 3 Oct 2019 11.00 EDTLast modified on Fri 4 Oct 2019 12.30 EDT



In the heart of Queensland, palaeontologists have found the fossilised partial skeleton of a new pterosaur species capable of flying across continents.

The pterosaur, with a four-metre wingspan, may have lived about 90m years ago.

It was found in ironstone near the outback town of Winton and named Ferrodraco lentoni – or “Butch’s Iron Dragon” – in honour of the pioneering former mayor of Winton, Graham “Butch” Lenton, who died in 2017.

The fossil was discovered by a local grazier in 2017. It is the most complete pterosaur specimen found in Australia; including parts of the skull and five vertebrae and wing elements.

“It would have been a sight to see,” said Adele Pentland from Swinburne University, the lead author of a study published in the journal Scientific Reports. “It has a wingspan of about four metres, which is pretty big compared to our modern-day birds.

 

More:
https://www.theguard...d-in-queensland



#51
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts
New giant predatory dinosaur species found in Thailand
OCT. 9, 2019 / 4:24 PM
By Brooks Hays


Oct. 9 (UPI) -- Paleontologists have discovered a new genus and species of dinosaur. The remains of the giant predatory dinosaur, named Siamraptor suwati, were recovered from the Khok Kruat Formation, an Early Cretaceous rock formation in northeastern Thailand.

The newly named species was an allosauroid theropod, a widespread group of apex predators that were active during the Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous periods.

For the study, scientists surveyed fossils representing the skull, backbone, limbs and hips of at least four individual dinosaurs. By comparing the dinosaur's anatomical structures to those of other allosauroids, scientists determined that the fossils warranted a new genus and species classification.

Phylogenetic analysis showed Siamraptor suwati was a basal member of a group of allosauroids called carcharodontosaurs, which means the species represents an early evolutionary split from the genus.

 



More:
https://www.upi.com/...531/?sl=1&ur3=1


#52
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts
Paleontologists discover complete Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen

by Katie Willis, University of Alberta

The discovery of a nearly complete dromaeosaurid Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen is providing critical information for the evolution of theropod dinosaurs, according to new research by a University of Alberta paleontologist.

 

The 76-million-year-old species was long thought to be so closely related to Velociraptor from Mongolia that some researchers even called it Velociraptor langstoni—until now.

The landmark discovery was made by world-renowned paleontologists Philip Currie and Clive Coy from the University of Alberta and David Evans, James and Louise Temerty Endowed Chair of Vertebrate Palaeontology at the Royal Ontario Museum. The research illustrates how Saurornitholestes differs from Velociraptor. Importantly, the research also identifies a unique tooth evolved for preening feathers and provides new evidence that the dromaeosaurid lineage from North America that includes Saurornitholestes is distinct from an Asian lineage that includes the famous Velociraptor.

 

https://phys.org/new...i-specimen.html



#53
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts
Monkey fossils found in Serbia offer clues about life in a warmer world millions of years ago

October 21, 2019 5.58pm EDT
Joshua Allan Lindal


Sparse trees cast long shadows as the morning sun rises over the grassy woodland clearing. Elephants and rhinos gather around a quiet watering hole. A troop of baboons starts chattering as they wake up, preparing for the sweltering heat the day will bring.

The scene is straight out of The Lion King, but this isn’t Africa — this is Eastern Europe at the end of the Pliocene epoch, three million years ago.

It’s a world that’s familiar to Predrag Radović, a paleontologist at the National Museum in Kraljevo, Serbia. Radović has studied fossils from extinct European elephants like Zygolophodon, a large mastodon with three-metre-long tusks, and Deinotherium, which looked like a modern African elephant, except that its tusks grew from its bottom jaw and curved downwards.

Radović has identified the remains of a 12.5 million-year-old whale from the Miocene epoch (5.3 million to 23 million years ago), when much of Europe was submerged beneath a vast inland sea. Now Radović is writing a report about a tooth from Stephanorhinus, an extinct rhinoceros from the Ice Age.

 


More:
https://theconversat...f-years-ago-125


#54
wjfox

wjfox

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,136 posts
  • LocationLondon

Elephant bird (a giant extinct species from Madagascar), ostrich, and hummingbird eggs:

 

 

Srs5Zo3.jpg



#55
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts
German scientists find 44-million-year-old caterpillar
https://www.dw.com/e...llar/a-51341040

German scientists find 44-million-year-old caterpillar

German researchers discovered a 44-million-year-old caterpillar, according to a paper published in the journal Scientific Reports on Wednesday.

The critter is the first caterpillar of its kind to be discovered in Baltic amber, according to researchers from the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology in Munich.

The 5-millimeter (0.2-inch) larva has been given the name Eogeometer vadens under the family of Geometridae butterflies, which comprises around 23,000 different species.

Scientists said the little caterpillar likely got trapped in a drop of tree resin, which ultimately hardened into amber and preserved the worm's unique structure over millions of years.

"Caterpillar finds in amber are rarities in any instance, and this is the first ever large butterfly fossil to be found in Baltic amber," study co-auther Axel Hausmann said. "This may be due to the noctural activity of most caterpillars," he added, given that resin would likely be closer to liquid in direct sunlight or warmer daytime temperatures.
(snip)

 

 



#56
zEVerzan

zEVerzan

    Orange Animating Android

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,739 posts
  • LocationSome Underground Sweatshop Probably

The Giant 'Egg Thief' - Gigantoraptor

 

n5mSPka.jpg

 

Apparently, dinosaurs were able to grow to the size they did only because they shared a key feature with their bird descendants: they were full of pneumatic air bladders that functioned as redundant lungs. Dinosaurs could be enormous because they were literally just less dense than other animals. Nature is amazing


I always imagined the future as a time of more reason, empathy, and peace, not less. It's time for a change.
Attention is currency in the "free marketplace of ideas".
I do other stuff besides gripe about the future! Twitter Youtube DeviantArt +-PATREON-+

#57
Erowind

Erowind

    Anarchist without an adjective

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,202 posts

It always amazes me how dinosaurs make megafauna look like normal fauna. At least on land. 



#58
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts
Great auk extinction: Humans wiped out giant seabird

By Victoria Gill
Science correspondent, BBC News
2 hours ago

_109899546_mediaitem109899545.jpg
 

"The great auk will always hold a place in my heart," Dr Jessica Thomas says.


The Swansea-based scientist spent years piecing together an ancient DNA puzzle that suggests hunting by humans caused this giant seabird's demise.

Dr Thomas studied bone and tissue samples from 41 museum specimens during a PhD at both Bangor and Copenhagen University.

The findings paint a picture of how vulnerable even the most common species are to human exploitation.

Storybook seabird
About 80cm (2ft 7in) tall, the stubby-winged and bulbous-billed great auks used to be found all across the north Atlantic - from North America through Greenland, Iceland, Scandinavia and the UK.

 


More:
https://www.bbc.com/...onment-50563953



#59
Jessica

Jessica

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,553 posts
Siberia: 18,000-year-old frozen 'dog' stumps scientists

28 November 2019

Researchers are trying to determine whether an 18,000-year-old puppy found in Siberia is a dog or a wolf.

The canine - which was two months old when it died - has been remarkably preserved in the permafrost of the Russian region, with its fur, nose and teeth all intact.

DNA sequencing has been unable to determine the species.

Scientists say that could mean the specimen represents an evolutionary link between wolves and modern dogs.

 



More:
https://www.bbc.com/...europe-50586508


#60
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

    Born Again Singularitarian

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,063 posts
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA

It's even better preserved than I thought going into this.

18000-year-old-puppy-permafrost-could-be

5727414_frozen-puppy.jpg?w=800&r=16%3A9

dogor-tray.jpg


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users