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Dinosaurs and prehistoric life


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#61
caltrek

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Scientists Find Missing Link Between Modern and Prehistoric Penguins

 

https://www.courthou...toric-penguins/

 

Introduction:

 

(Courthouse News) – Scientists have discovered the missing link between modern penguins and their ancient ancestors who lived more than 60 million years ago, identifying a new species Monday that lived beside its human-sized penguin cousins.

 

In a paper published in the journal Palaeontologia Electronica, researchers pieced together the fossils of the newly described Kupoupou stilwelli penguin found in the Chatham Islands near New Zealand’s South Island in the Pacific Ocean.

 

The species, with proportions more in line with modern penguins, appears to be the oldest link between the two. Research scientists said it lived between 60 – 62.5 million years ago when the waters around New Zealand were tropical.

 

Jacob Blokland, Flinders University palaeontology doctoral candidate, discovered the existence of the ancient species after examining fossils collected from the island.

“Next to its colossal human-sized cousins, including the recently described monster penguin Crossvallia waiparensis, Kupoupou was comparatively small – no bigger than modern king penguins which stand just under 1.1 metres (3.6 feet) tall,” Blokland said in a statement.


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#62
Jessica

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Dinosaurs may have faced volcanic climate change before the asteroid
December 16, 2019
 

A gigantic asteroid is usually fingered as the sole culprit in the extinction of the dinosaurs, but that isn’t the whole story. Fossilized shells from that period have now revealed that Earth’s systems were already stressed before the impact, as volcanic eruptions may have heated the oceans and raised mercury levels to dangerous heights.

Technically, dinosaurs were a victim of climate change – the question is what triggered it. An asteroid impact is only directly deadly to those animals unlucky enough to be in the direct line of fire. Instead, the majority of life on Earth would have succumbed to the effects of climate change that followed.

The impact would have kicked up huge amounts of rock and dust, which hung around in the atmosphere for years to come. Sulfuric acid would have rained down, making the oceans more acidic. Meanwhile, the dust cloud would have blocked sunlight for months, killing off many plants. Those two things together would have devastated the bottom rungs of the food chain, rippling upwards and upsetting most life on Earth.

 

https://newatlas.com...climate-change/


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#63
Jessica

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Baby dinosaurs found in Australia

by University of New England

Researchers have uncovered the first baby dinosaurs from Australia. The bones were discovered at several sites along the south coast of Victoria and near the outback town of Lightning Ridge in New South Wales. Some of the bones are so tiny, they likely come from animals that had died while they were still in their eggs. Slightly larger bones from Victoria come from animals that had recently hatched but were probably nest-bound.

 

The research was carried out by palaeontologists from the Palaeoscience Research Centre at the University of New England and the Australian Opal Centre in Lightning Ridge.

The bones come from small-bodied ornithopod dinosaurs—two legged herbivores that weighed roughly 20kg when full grown—similar to Weewarrasaurus, which was recently discovered by members of the same team at Lightning Ridge. By comparison, the baby dinosaurs were only about 200g when they died, less that the weight of a cup of water.

 

https://phys.org/new...-australia.html



#64
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#65
Jessica

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Fossils of largest theropod to date found in Australia

by Bob Yirka , Phys.org

A team of researchers from the University of New England, the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Natural History Museum and Swinburne University of Technology, all in Australia, has identified fossils found near Winton as remains of the largest theropod found to date in Australia. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes the bones they found and its likely species.

 

In 2017, a farmer in the central-western Queensland town of Winton discovered several fragmented bones on his property. Suspecting they might be dinosaur fossils, he contacted the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Natural History Museum. A team was assembled, and a dig was established. The researchers found 15 more limb and vertebrae fossils.

 

https://phys.org/new...-australia.html


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