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Dinosaurs and prehistoric life


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#81
caltrek

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World's Smallest Dinosaur Egg Fossil Discovered in Japan

 

https://www.japantim...saur-egg-japan/

 

Introduction:

(Japan Times) A team of researchers said Tuesday it has discovered the world’s smallest dinosaur egg fossil, measuring about 4.5 cm by 2 cm, in western Japan.

 

The fossil of the egg, estimated to have weighed only about 10 grams more than 100 million years ago, was found in a stratum dating back to the early Cretaceous Period in Tamba, Hyogo Prefecture, according to the team.

 

The researchers at the University of Tsukuba and the Museum of Nature and Human Activities, Hyogo, among others, who have analyzed the fossil, said it likely belonged to a nonavian small theropod.

 

Skeletal remains of small dinosaurs are far less common than those of large dinosaurs, such as the Tyrannosaurus, which was also a theropod, and Kohei Tanaka of the University of Tsukuba, a member of the team, said he hopes the discovery will “help shed light on how small dinosaurs reproduced and nested.”

 

The team surveyed the stratum, which dates back 110 million years, between 2015 and 2019 and found four fossil eggs and over 1,300 scattered eggshell fragments.


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#82
Raklian

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How to Outrun a Dinosaur

 


 

A FULL-GROWN Tyrannosaurus rex was absurdly huge and absurdly powerful. It had rows of teeth it could push through Triceratops bone, could toss human-sized chunks of meat 16 feet into the air with its jaws, was as tall as a giraffe, and, at nine tons, was as heavy as an elephant. And yet if you see one, you should be only mildly concerned. Tyrannosaurus rex had proportionally more muscles devoted to its movement than nearly any animal that’s ever lived, Eric Snively, a biologist at Oklahoma State who studies the biomechanics of dinosaurs tells me. And yet you could likely escape it, because a Tyrannosaur couldn’t run.

 

 

 

dino-graphs-web-4.jpg

 

 

https://www.wired.co...cial-type=owned

 

 

 

Fascinating. This article is stays true to the science of outrunning a dinosaur.


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#83
Erowind

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13mph? I could outrun the beast but I know a lot of people who couldn't.



#84
Yuli Ban

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https://en.wikipedia.../All_Yesterdays

All Yesterdays: Unique and Speculative Views of Dinosaurs and Other Prehistoric Animals is a 2012 art book on the palaeoartistic reconstruction of dinosaurs and other extinct animals by John ConwayC. M. Kosemen and Darren Naish. A central tenet of the book concerns the fact that many dinosaur reconstructions are outdated, overly conservative, and inconsistent with the variation observed in modern animals. This focus is communicated through an exploration of views of dinosaurs and related animals that are unusual and sometimes even confusing to viewers, but which are well within the bounds of behaviour, anatomy and soft tissue that we see in living animals.

 

 

 

The T-rex was a giant chicken.

And those velociraptors? Basically pheasants.


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#85
Yuli Ban

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https://www.reddit.c...sdrawnlikedinos

An elephant, a rhinoceros and a horse reconstructed with the mistakes we often see in reconstructions of dinosaurs and other extinct animals.

HXgnFqN.png


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#86
Yuli Ban

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#87
Yuli Ban

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#88
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Chonkasaurus

#89
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Scientists follow the nose to solve mystery of long-necked reptile

6 Aug 2020

 

2388.jpg?width=300&quality=85&auto=forma

 

The mystery of an ancient reptile with a tremendously long neck has been solved, according to researchers who say the creature lived in the water.

 

Fossils of the creature, known as Tanystropheus, were first unearthed in Germany around 150 years ago and further specimens have turned up over the decades, largely at Monte San Giorgio on the Swiss-Italian border.

 

Thought to have lived around 242m years ago, the largest specimens were 6 metres in length, with a tiny skull, tail and a long, stiff neck almost three times the length of its body.

 

“It probably is the most remarkable [fossil] reptile that there is,” Dr Nick Fraser, a palaeontologist at National Museums Scotland and a co-author of the new research, told the Guardian.

 

https://www.theguard...e-tanystropheus


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#90
caltrek

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Palaeontologists Discover a New Species of Dinosaur on The Isle of Wight

 

https://www.sciencea...e-isle-of-wight

 

Introduction:

(Science Alert)  Say hello to a new theropod dinosaur species, Vectaerovenator inopinatus. Discovered after a series of serendipitous fossil finds on the Isle of Wight in the UK, it's thought to date from around 115 million years ago, during the Cretaceous period.

 

The Latin name of the new dino roughly refers to 'unexpected air-filled hunter from the Isle of Wight', which gives you some idea of how and where it was found, the type of dinosaur that it is, and how palaeontologists were able to figure out what they were dealing with.

 

All four discovered fossils are hollow or "air-filled", which points to the delicate structure of the animal and places it in the theropod group, alongside other dinosaurs such as the Tyrannosaurus rex and the ancestors of modern-day birds.

 

"We were struck by just how hollow this animal was – it's riddled with air spaces," says palaeontologist Chris Barker, from the University of Southampton in the UK. "Parts of its skeleton must have been rather delicate."

new-dino-2.jpg

 

Silhouette of a theropod indicating where the uncovered bones are from.

(Darren Naish)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#91
Yuli Ban

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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#92
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First complete dinosaur skeleton ever found is ready for its closeup at last

by University of Cambridge

The first complete dinosaur skeleton ever identified has finally been studied in detail and found its place in the dinosaur family tree, completing a project that began more than a century and a half ago.

The skeleton of this dinosaur, called Scelidosaurus, was collected more than 160 years ago on west Dorset's Jurassic Coast. The rocks in which it was fossilised are around 193 million years old, close to the dawn of the Age of Dinosaurs.

This remarkable specimen—the first complete dinosaur skeleton ever recovered—was sent to Richard Owen at the British Museum, the man who invented the word dinosaur.

So, what did Owen do with this find? He published two short papers on its anatomy, but many details were left unrecorded. Owen did not reconstruct the animal as it might have appeared in life and made no attempt to understand its relationship to other known dinosaurs of the time. In short, he 're-buried' it in the literature of the time, and so it has remained ever since: known, yet obscure and misunderstood.

 

https://phys.org/new...dy-closeup.html



#93
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#94
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