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Anti aging thread


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#41
caltrek

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I originally posted this in another thread, but I think it is also highly relevant to this thread.  Now, if I could only find the time to read through this thread.

 

 

DNA testing companies offer telomere testing – but what does it tell you about aging and disease risk?

 

https://theconversat...ase-risk-118019

 

Introduction:

Quote

 

(The Conversation) Over the past few years direct-to-consumer genetic tests that extract information from DNA in your chromosomes have become popular. Through a simple cheek swab, saliva collection or finger prick, companies offer the possibility of learning more about your family tree, ancestry, or risk of developing diseases such as Alzheimer’s or even certain cancers. More recently, some companies offer tests to measure the tips of chromosomes, called telomeres, to learn more about aging.

 

But what exactly are telomeres, what are telomere tests, and what are companies claiming they can tell you? Age based on your birthday versus your “telomere age”?

 

Telomeres play a big role in keeping our chromosomes and bodies healthy even though they make up only a tiny fraction of our total DNA. The Greek origins of the word telomere describes where to find them. “Telo” means “end” while “mere” means “part.” Telomeres cap both ends of all 46 chromosomes in each cell, and protect chromosomes from losing genetic material. They are often compared to the plastic tips at the ends of shoelaces that prevent fraying.

 

We are molecular biologists studying how chemicals, agents from the environment and metabolism damage telomeres and affect their lengths and function, and how damaged telomeres affect the health of our cells and genome. The idea of offering telomere length as part of a genetic test is intriguing since telomeres protect our genetic material. But equating telomere length with something as complex as aging struck us as tricky and overly simplistic.

file-20190617-118539-130f0e2.jpg?ixlib=r

 

Telomeres get shorter with each round of cell division.

 Kateryna Kon/Shutterstock.com


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#42
Singularity Kills

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David Sinclair talks here (briefly) about the cellular round trip technology George Church is working on which involves pulsing the body by telling all cells to go from to stem cell and back again. He obviously doesn't want to give numbers and data but you can hear the excitement in his voice.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=bF5yl9OGKzw


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#43
starspawn0

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Reversal of ageing- and injury-induced vision loss by Tet-dependent epigenetic reprogramming

https://www.biorxiv....0.1101/710210v1

George Church and David Sinclair are both coauthors on this paper, which has like 26 coauthors.
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#44
starspawn0

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Yet more protective and anti-aging effects of Metformin... in rodents, and possibly also in humans. The human trials have not been performed, but the evidence probably exists in large-scale patient records.

https://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/20/1/42

Despite growing evidence on metformin as a candidate drug for renal diseases, in-depth research is imperative to unravel the molecular signaling pathways responsible for metformin’s renoprotective actions. This review will discuss the current state-of-the-art literature on clinical and preclinical data, and put forward potential cellular mechanisms and molecular pathways by which metformin ameliorates AKI/CKD.


And could delay or remove the need for dialysis.

I saw another study showing that it could also protect the liver.

Alas, that drug is off-limits to you unless you have diabetes or pre-diabetes. If you are healthy... get to the back of the line. I think that's fundamentally unfair, especially given the drug's well-established safety. In fact, it's probably safer than most over-the-counter drugs.

I think we need leadership in Washington that isn't afraid to revise the role of the FDA, allowing people to try well-established, safe drugs for off-label uses.
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#45
starspawn0

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This is an interesting article from December of last year:

E-bandage generates electricity, speeds wound healing in rats

https://www.scienced...81219115519.htm

It's known that Electrical Stimulation Therapy (EST) speeds the healing process of wounds in animals and in humans; however, I was surprised how effective this new bandage was for rats:
 

Wounds covered by e-bandages closed within 3 days, compared with 12 days for a control bandage with no electric field. The researchers attribute the faster wound healing to enhanced fibroblast migration, proliferation and differentiation induced by the electric field.


Amazing!

There's also evidence that EST can:

* Reduce pain near the surface of the skin at different areas of the body;

* Induce the regeneration of peripherial nerves. Yes, it really does work, according to multiple studies!

* And, at least in rats, it has been shown to massively boost androgen receptors. This should be of interest to body builders, or people low in androgen receptors.

It's possible there are yet more uses that haven't been tested for yet. For example, EST inside the body might actually rejuvenate major organs. Nobody has done that experiment, as far as I know.
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#46
Jessica

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Scientists reverse aging process in rat brain stem cells

by University of Cambridge

New research, published today in Nature, reveals how increasing brain stiffness as we age causes brain stem cell dysfunction, and demonstrates new ways to reverse older stem cells to a younger, healthier state.

 

The results have far reaching implications for how we understand the ageing process, and how we might develop much-needed treatments for age-related brain diseases.

As our bodies age, muscles and joints can become stiff, making everyday movements more difficult. This study shows the same is true in our brains, and that age-related brain stiffening has a significant impact on the function of brain stem cells.

A multi-disciplinary research team, based at the Wellcome-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute (University of Cambridge), studied young and old rat brains to understand the impact of age-related brain stiffening on the function of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs).

 

https://medicalxpres...-rat-brain.html



#47
starspawn0

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The Transhumanists Who Want to Live Forever

https://www.technolo...s-live-forever/
 

Given these clues, Clement is expanding his medicine cabinet of pills. So far he has financed and supervised four small studies, in volunteers, of treatments found to extend the healthy lives of rodents—the immune drug rapamycin, the supplement NAD+, a combination of compounds that kill off aged cells, and injections of plasma concentrated from umbilical cords. His aim is “to do as many small trials as possible” to generate and publish basic information on safety and possible benefits. With that, he says, people interested in life extension “can decide to take the risk.”


Good for him. I should probably read more what this guy is up to.

As I said before, we need to revise the role of the FDA, so that people can experiment with drugs that are now considered off-limits (unless you are unhealthy).
 

“I think anybody under 50 who does not have a genetic liability will make it to longevity escape velocity.”


That's good to hear -- though, I might have some "genetic liabilities". Based on lab test results, I am in perfect health; probably the top 10 percentile, healthwise, and maybe even top 2 percentile. I don't have high blood pressure, diabetes, or heart disease; and various tests I took indicate that my risk of development any of them is pretty low.

One thing mentioned:
 

After Kirkland showed that another drug, called fisetin, makes mice fed it live about 20% longer, self-experimenters didn’t delay in trying it. “The Mayo clinic protocol called for 180mg, but I decided to [hit] those zombie cells harder,” read a post I found on the Age Reversal Network, a bulletin board that’s a hotbed of longevity tips.


I looked into fisetin. Unfortunately, it's hard to get a lot of it in supplement form -- and you need a lot of it, because it has low bioavailability. One solution would be to find a better way to extract it or produce it; another would be to find some way to enhance the bioavailability (e.g. via injection or patch).


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