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***My Alien Planets Thread -- UPDATE!!! ***

alien planets pictures scifi

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#1
Jakob

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Hey everyone, most of you probably don't remember, but I posted some of my conceptual art of alien planets three years ago--Outlook will probably be especially interested. Now, armed with a newly discovered tool and some texture maps I made myself, I have done a huge re-imagining of the planets I created and made some far more high-quality images!

 

Updates to follow.

 

And please change "plants" to "planets". Thanks!


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#2
Erowind

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Looking forward to this!
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Current status: slaving away for the math gods of Pythagoras VII.


#3
Jakob

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Here comes the first picture. This is Glunk, a Super-Earth measuring 1.38 Earth radii and 2.89 Earth masses. It is known for its extremely bright reddish hue, surpassing even that of Mars before the terraforming, though its reddish hue also comes primarily from iron oxides. The surface of Glunk is dotted with salt lakes, the largest of which can be seen at the center of this picture and are thousands of kilometers across, yet only a few meters deep. These lakes are covered with a salt crust (mainly sodium and potassium chloride) causing them to appear white from space. Due to the dense atmosphere, these lakes can remain liquid despite their hypersaline composition. With an average surface temperature of 64 Celsius, life is possible here, but only just. The biota is quite sparse and consists mostly of microbial biofilms and insectoid creatures.

 

WTA2Y5m.jpg

 

 

There is also a gif of Glunk over the course of a day, as seen from geostationary orbit, which I cannot embed.

 

Ah, here we go.

 

wRjMW2y.gif


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#4
Jakob

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If Glunk is the hot twin of Mars, then Glork is the cool twin of Venus and about the same size too: 0.95 Earth radii and 0.81 Earth masses. With 27 atmospheres of pressure and a temperature nearing 150 Celsius, this place is completely inhospitable for life and even probes face great difficulty surviving for extended periods. Here the thick cloud cover has been digitally removed to reveal the surface. Several large fossae can be seen in the southern hemisphere.

Vose2tt.jpg

Gif from geostationary orbit.

xtbMGZK.gif


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#5
Jakob

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The planet Gleek is an ice planet, orbiting close to the frost line--at a roughly equivalent distance as the asteroid belt in our Solar System. It is the smallest planet in the system, at 0.73 Earth radii and 0.14 Earth masses. With an average surface temperature of -99 Celsius and a thin atmosphere of CO2--just over the Armstrong limit--there is little opportunity for non-extremophile life. A close analogue is TRAPPIST-1h. Yet it has interesting geography. The white surface primarily consists of water ice, with some CO2 and ammonia ices and other trace ices. However, this surface is strewn with dark patches consisting of various volatiles deposited by asteroid impacts of vulcanism over millions of years. Gleek has two small moons, likely captured asteroids.

P8TIVDH.jpg

Fully illuminated:

p3JgQRK.jpg

Geosynchronous:

9dh400D.gif


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#6
Jakob

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I have loads more, but it's getting late.



#7
Jakob

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This is from an entirely different system!

 

Here we have a garden world fittingly called Garden--a rather common name for planets across Sapiendom. With an average surface temperature of 9 Celsius, it is dominated by grasslands and forests. It is an Earth-sized world, at 1.05 Earth radii and 1.01 Earth masses, but does not closely resemble the famous Blue Marble. In the lieu of oceans, its surface is dotted with small lakes; some of the larger ones can be seen along the equator here. The blurriness of this picture can be attributed to the fact that the photographer was jostled by other colonists in the viewing room.

U6BG168.jpg

A gif from geostationary orbit:

RznGYZA.gif


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#8
Jakob

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Oops, forgot one from the old system. This is me re-imagining of Harbon as a sub-Saturn gas giant with 50 Earth masses. It's far towards the outer reaches of the system and thus much more akin to Uranus or Neptune in terms of composition though. The featureless blue-green surface, rather like Uranus, is broken by several dark storms in the northern hemisphere. Harbon has 14 moons, none of which are particularly large or interesting.

YwYHWm0.jpg

Gif from geostationary orbit:

A4yfnIg.gif


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#9
Jakob

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This barren planet proves that even Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone are not always garden worlds. In this case, toxic gases in the atmosphere and a relatively young age are to blame.

PLunsXK.jpg

Gif from geostationary orbit

wW4Q2dv.gif


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#10
Jakob

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A Mega-Earth known as Enigma, with 10.1 Earth masses and 2.1 Earth radii. Most of the planet is covered in dense clouds and a thick, soupy atmosphere. In addition to unpleasantly strong gravity, it has a magnetic field considerably more powerful than Earth's, which leads to spectacular auroras at most latitudes on the rare occasion that the weather is clear.

YWg4Mwa.jpg

Gif:

vERGoRa.gif


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#11
Jakob

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A Super-Earth in the process of being terraformed. After a century of effort, greenery is finally beginning to take hold on parts of the surface. The careful observer can just make out some lakes and domed cities on the surface. This planet is named Amanda and measures 3.07 Earth masses and 1.42 Earth radii.

JarAtuG.jpg

Obligatory gif:

TRtGg7x.gif



#12
Jakob

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A rather large gas giant measuring 120 Earth masses and 8.5 Earth radii, with an entourage of 39 moons. Lightning storms and a few wispy dark clouds--nothing like the enormous storms on Harbon--break the featureless surface of this Sudarsky Class II gas giant. Currently unnamed.

Iqr1t26.jpg

Gif:

pVs2SDW.gif


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#13
Jakob

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The rings of an unknown gas giant.

1bq9CrE.jpg



#14
Jakob

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This is Vulcan, a sub-earth planet with a radius of 1100 kilometers and a mass 0.006 times that of Earth. Orbiting close to its star with a surface temperature of 220 Celsius, it has no appreciable atmosphere. The heavily cratered surface has a layer of carbon dust, but its composition is mostly iron and nickel.

QeOTAwF.jpg

Gif:

y32LxRa.gif


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#15
wjfox

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Very creative, Jakob. :) Have you played Elite: Dangerous?


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#16
Sciencerocks

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This is a very creative and interesting project jakob.

 

Keep up the good work!


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#17
Jakob

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Very creative, Jakob. :) Have you played Elite: Dangerous?

No, but I've heard about it. It sounds very interesting!

 

This is a very creative and interesting project jakob.

 

Keep up the good work!

Thanks! I've got three more stashed away, but then I'll have to go make some more textures.



#18
Jakob

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A strange sort of ammonia/methane world with a greenish gaze. Geologically, it is quite like a larger version of Titan. The sky is cyan by day, but fades to a deep violet at dusk. It measures 1.42 Earth radii and 1.93 Earth masses, with the surface temperature a cozy -165 Celsius. This world is named Huygens.

b3v3EcC.jpg

Here it is spinning.

2YcFV9h.gif



#19
Jakob

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This world is eerily similar, but is actually a more terrestrial planet named Shotwell, located hundreds of light years from Huygens. Radius: 1.27 Earth radii, mass: 1.95 Earth masses. Surface temperature: -1 Celsius. Many galactic explorers have remarked upon the strange coincidence.

nqjhzh0.jpg



#20
Jakob

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This is Jakesego, a colossal "puffy planet" measuring 15 Earth radii and 241 Earth masses--about three fourths as heavy as Jupiter, but three times the volume. Orbiting very close to its star, it has a temperature of 925 Celsius. The murky brown atmosphere is caused by atmospheric impurities including metal gases, and in the northern hemisphere, several "white spots"--Earth-sized cyclones that rage for centuries like Jupiter's Great Red Spot--can be seen. Overall not a very hospitable place to visit. Quite full of hot air, one might say.

ZH91tB2.jpg

Spinning:

JWVbHkl.gif


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