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When will the first cryogenically preserved people get successfully revived?


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#1
Futurist

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When will the first cryogenically preserved people get successfully revived?

 

Does anyone have any guesses in regards to this?

 

Also, for the record, I am not talking about having one's mind downloaded into a computer, since that would just create a copy of you. Rather, I am talking about actually reviving one's cryogenically preserved body (or, alternatively, growing a new body for your cryogenically preserved head before it is revived).

 

Any thoughts on this?



#2
Jakob

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Probably no one from today will be fully recoverable, though some might be partially recoverable, and educated guesswork could fill in the gaps. Probably a few decades from now, someone will be frozen in a fully recoverable manner, and thawed a few years later for whatever reason. 


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#3
Jakob

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that would just create a copy of you

Your brain's structure is being altered all the time, but you wouldn't say you're continuously destroyed and copies are created, would you? I think the most reasonable thing to do is define a set of boundaries for one's identity, and if your brain meet stays within those boundaries, you're you, and if it strays outside, then you're legally someone else (though you may or may not be socially someone else, depending on what your friends and family think). You may, of course, define and redefine these parameters yourself at any time, though if you've strayed from the parameters, you can't retroactively adjust them to make the previous person legally you. I call this idea a deep mind ID core.



#4
funkervogt

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I don't think we'll be able to successfully thaw humans out of cryostasis until we have nanomachines or at least micromachines that can repair the freezing damage to their tissue at the cellular level, which pushes this milestone well into the 2100s. 

 

 

 

Probably no one from today will be fully recoverable, though some might be partially recoverable, and educated guesswork could fill in the gaps. Probably a few decades from now, someone will be frozen in a fully recoverable manner, and thawed a few years later for whatever reason. 

I think that's probably true. Certainly, the odds of recovery will increase as we become able to do cheaper, higher-res brain scans of people before they are frozen (which would be used to guide their cellular-level reconstruction as they are thawed out), and as we invent better cryoprotectants and freezing techniques. I agree that freezing people in "a fully recoverable manner" will be possible within a few decades, and before the year 2100. 



#5
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I don't think we'll be able to successfully thaw humans out of cryostasis until we have nanomachines or at least micromachines that can repair the freezing damage to their tissue at the cellular level, which pushes this milestone well into the 2100s. 

 

 

 

Probably no one from today will be fully recoverable, though some might be partially recoverable, and educated guesswork could fill in the gaps. Probably a few decades from now, someone will be frozen in a fully recoverable manner, and thawed a few years later for whatever reason. 

I think that's probably true. Certainly, the odds of recovery will increase as we become able to do cheaper, higher-res brain scans of people before they are frozen (which would be used to guide their cellular-level reconstruction as they are thawed out), and as we invent better cryoprotectants and freezing techniques. I agree that freezing people in "a fully recoverable manner" will be possible within a few decades, and before the year 2100. 

So, should someone who is going to die between 2030 and 2040 celebrate or be sad?



#6
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that would just create a copy of you

Your brain's structure is being altered all the time, but you wouldn't say you're continuously destroyed and copies are created, would you? I think the most reasonable thing to do is define a set of boundaries for one's identity, and if your brain meet stays within those boundaries, you're you, and if it strays outside, then you're legally someone else (though you may or may not be socially someone else, depending on what your friends and family think). You may, of course, define and redefine these parameters yourself at any time, though if you've strayed from the parameters, you can't retroactively adjust them to make the previous person legally you. I call this idea a deep mind ID core.

Here's how I think of it--if you put a file online and someone else downloads it and then makes changes to it, your original file is still going to remain exactly the same. Thus, the downloaded file is certainly not the same thing as the original file.

 

Similarly, if I was somehow able to travel back to the past and prevent my past self from doing something, then my "past me" would no longer be me since I would have split the timeline into two separate timelines.



#7
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Also, when exactly do you think that we will have a cure to aging or at least anti-aging treatment which makes one age at a slower pace?



#8
TranscendingGod

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I was reading an interview with Aubrey de Grey that said that there was a new cryopreservation technique or tool that is supposedly like what vitrification was to the old style of freezing. Anyways the point was that the new method is supposed to be a vastly superior method of preservation than previous methods. Perhaps this means that thawing people out may be accelerated by a decade or so. 

 

My guess however would be towards the end of the next decade. 


The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#9
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I was reading an interview with Aubrey de Grey that said that there was a new cryopreservation technique or tool that is supposedly like what vitrification was to the old style of freezing. Anyways the point was that the new method is supposed to be a vastly superior method of preservation than previous methods. Perhaps this means that thawing people out may be accelerated by a decade or so. 

 

My guess however would be towards the end of the next decade. 

You think that someone's going to get un-frozen by 2029? 



#10
Jakob

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I was reading an interview with Aubrey de Grey that said that there was a new cryopreservation technique or tool that is supposedly like what vitrification was to the old style of freezing. Anyways the point was that the new method is supposed to be a vastly superior method of preservation than previous methods. Perhaps this means that thawing people out may be accelerated by a decade or so. 

 

My guess however would be towards the end of the next decade. 

You think that someone's going to get un-frozen by 2029? 

 

Hahahahahaha



#11
TranscendingGod

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I think it's not an untenable position with a sufficiently preserved specimen. 


The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#12
Futurist

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I think it's not an untenable position with a sufficiently preserved specimen. 

You mean specifically a human or any cryogenically preserved organism?



#13
Futurist

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I was reading an interview with Aubrey de Grey that said that there was a new cryopreservation technique or tool that is supposedly like what vitrification was to the old style of freezing. Anyways the point was that the new method is supposed to be a vastly superior method of preservation than previous methods. Perhaps this means that thawing people out may be accelerated by a decade or so. 

 

My guess however would be towards the end of the next decade. 

You think that someone's going to get un-frozen by 2029? 

 

Hahahahahaha

Yeah, this strikes me as being extremely unrealistic--even for small animals such as mice--let alone for humans!



#14
TranscendingGod

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I think it's not an untenable position with a sufficiently preserved specimen. 

You mean specifically a human or any cryogenically preserved organism?

 

A human but certainly small mammals. Organisms have already been brought back so there is no question as to that aspect. 


The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#15
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I think it's not an untenable position with a sufficiently preserved specimen. 

You mean specifically a human or any cryogenically preserved organism?

 

A human but certainly small mammals. Organisms have already been brought back so there is no question as to that aspect. 

Which organisms have been brought back?



#16
Frizz

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I'm gonna guess around 2080 at the earliest if it will be at all possible, and 2150 if being conservative.
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#17
TranscendingGod

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I think it's not an untenable position with a sufficiently preserved specimen. 

You mean specifically a human or any cryogenically preserved organism?

 

A human but certainly small mammals. Organisms have already been brought back so there is no question as to that aspect. 

Which organisms have been brought back?

 

Worms, tardigrades, etc


The growth of computation is doubly exponential growth. 


#18
Raklian

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I don't know if you guys know this, but Aubrey de Grey is a member of Alcor Life Extension Foundation and is arranged to be cyropreserved upon his death.


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#19
Futurist

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I think it's not an untenable position with a sufficiently preserved specimen. 

You mean specifically a human or any cryogenically preserved organism?

 

A human but certainly small mammals. Organisms have already been brought back so there is no question as to that aspect. 

Which organisms have been brought back?

Worms, tardigrades, etc

Interesting.

 

Were these worms, etc still alive when they were cryogenically preserved?



#20
Futurist

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I don't know if you guys know this, but Aubrey de Grey is a member of Alcor Life Extension Foundation and is arranged to be cyropreserved upon his death.

Yes, but what relevance does it have to this?






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