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The Future of Housing in America

United States Housing Economics HUD Community Reinvestment Act Elizabeth Warren

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#1
caltrek

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I often read that Democrats need to do more than just be against Trump.  They need to indicate what they support. So, it is great to see Elizabeth Warren coming forward with serious detailed legislative proposals.  These will probably never be supported by a Republican House, a Republican Senate, or by Donald Trump.  Still, it does put a plausible path forward for consideration which I think is worthy of consideration. Case in point is her plan for housing.

 

Senator Elizabeth Warren’s Bold New $500B Plan for Housing

 

https://nonprofitqua...an-for-housing/

 

Introduction:

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) Earlier this month, at NPQ, we covered the fiftieth anniversary of a 1968 housing bill that led to the construction of over a million new units of affordable housing in three years before it was scuttled by the Nixon administration. These days, housing production, hobbled by an underfunded system of tax credits, falls far short of those levels. Earlier this year, Benjamin Schneider in City Lab cited a report by an advocacy group called Up for Growth, which calculates that US housing production fell 7.3 million units short of demand from 2000 to 2015, which has led to increasing shortfalls in housing affordability in many US communities.

 

Now, Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) seeks to close that gap. While not as ambitious as the US 1968 housing law, Warren’s bill, with a price of $500 billion over 10 years, would, if passed, easily be the largest federal housing initiative in decades.

 

“Housing is the biggest expense for most working families—and costs for everyone, everywhere are skyrocketing,” notes Warren.

 

Warren’s bill is called the American Housing and Economic Mobility Act. The bill, explains Nik DeCosta-Klipa of the Boston Globe, involves two main components: 1) federal funds for housing construction and assistance, 2) incentives for localities to loosen zoning rules. Warren’s bill would fund its goals by raising estate taxes by a like amount.

 

Specific elements include (see article linked above for further discussion).

housing-is-a-right.jpg

"Housing is a Right,” Tony Webster


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#2
caltrek

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America's home-buying jitters

 

http://theweek.com/a...ebuying-jitters

 

Introduction:

 

(MarketWatch) Owning a home, that time-honored life milestone, used to simply be what you did as an adult in America, and for many people home ownership was the ultimate indicator of life success and social status. But times have changed.

 

According to Fannie Mae, a mere 24% of Americans feel that now is a good time to buy a house. Looking back to 2013, when 54% of consumers were confident about the housing market, it feels as if a lot has changed in a small amount of time.

 

The housing market is far from a perfect science, but there are trends that could be influencing homeowner behavior and confidence, such as:

  • Rising house prices
  • Salary stagnation
  • Generational trends
  • Relatively high interest rates

(See linked article for a further discussion of these trends).

MW-GQ055_cr_hou_20180913161005_ZH.jpg?uu


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#3
bgates276

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I don't think housing is a 'right'. Suppose you were stranded on a desert island, and all there were, were trees and tools. Would housing be a given? No, you'd have to get off your butt and build the thing yourself if you wanted one. At the very least, I think people who want to live in publicly built housing should have to contribute to the construction or maintenance.


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#4
Alislaws

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I think there needs to be an effort to distinguish human rights, which are basic and inalienable and include things like freedom of religion, freedom from being tortured etc. 

 

And then Civil rights which include things like healthcare and housing etc. if the government/people of a nation feel that is appropriate. 

 

Ultimately you shouldn't have any Human rights which require someone else to provide them. Such as a human right to food/education/healthcare etc. 

If this is true, then Farmers/Teachers/Doctors are all basically slaves, since, if they ever try to stop working they can be immediately charged with human rights violations by international criminal courts etc. if they can't organise their own replacement. 

 

To clarify, you can have a human right not to be forcibly/deliberately starved, as that just requires people ​not to do something, or not to have housing withheld or taken away without due cause etc. 



#5
caltrek

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Both Bgates276 and Alislaws have made good comments. I have a slightly different take.

 

Basic housing should be a right.

 

Some qualifications:

 

1. If the society has the resources to provide such housing without undue strain on the part of its population.  Certainly, circumstances where housing is in such shortage that it would be an unfair burden on hard-working members of that society to provide it as a right should be seen as an exception.  Basically, it should be a right in developed countries. The societies of relatively undeveloped countries are therefore an exception. I think that handles the "stranded on a desert island" hypothetical. Even developed countries hit by catastrophes (such as major earthquakes or hurricanes) may be a temporary exception.

 

2. Home ownership should be thought of as a right in the sense that all should have an opportunity for such ownership. Being given that opportunity may very well entail sweat equity for "construction or maintenance" being provided by those desiring to own their own homes.  

 

The reality (whether I like it or not) is that rights are revocable.  So somebody willing to live in basic shelters with relatively limited living space risk a dependency that may someday be to their detriment.  So, I think there are still plenty of incentives to encourage people to work hard for "rights" such as food and shelter.  Even when such rights are temporarily "guaranteed".   


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#6
caltrek

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Experts say California needs to build a lot more housing. But the public disagrees

 

http://www.latimes.c...1021-story.html

 

Introduction:

 

(Los Angeles Times) Academic researchers, state analysts and California’s gubernatorial candidates agree that the fundamental issue underlying the state’s housing crisis is that there are not enough homes for everyone who wants to live here.

 

The problem, a new poll says, is that the public doesn’t believe it.

 

A USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times survey found that just 13% of eligible California voters believe that too little home building is a primary contributor to the state’s affordability issues. The answer ranked sixth among eight options offered in the poll, when first and second responses were combined. (Poll results reflect the percentage of people who chose a particular reason as their first or second option.) Lack of rent control topped the list with 28%.

 

 

 

Caltrek's comment:  I think rent control can be of limited help.  The problem with using it as a one size fits all solution has to do with markets.  Cut rental rates too low and you eliminate the incentive to put units out on the market. So rent control only works in moderation and when combined with other incentives to build. Such incentives can be financial, but they can also be such things as zoning, inclusionary housing requirements (which often do have a financial aspect), infrastructure support, etc.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#7
caltrek

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“Housing First” Model for Addressing Homelessness vs. NIMBYism

 

https://nonprofitqua...ss-vs-nimbyism/

 

Introduction:

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) To label opposition to social housing projects as “NIMBY” (“not in my back yard”) is an oversimplification that does little to discourage the type of harmful hyperbole that is typical of NIMBY arguments:

  • “The problem is just being moved from somewhere else, why is it our problem now?”
  • “This is going to bring drugs/crime/disruption to our neighborhood!”
  • “We paid taxes for a nice neighborhood, not one that is full of transient strangers.”

It is certainly understandable when nonprofits—often simultaneously in the trenches providing direct services as well as driving social policy progress for addressing America’s massive homelessness issues—are frustrated by these mostly spurious arguments. But citizens do deserve to be properly consulted about significant changes in their neighborhoods (and, indeed, will demand it), and there are consequences when residents feel surprised. This only feeds into NIMBY thinking and supports a perspective that a particular community is being victimized.

no-nimby.jpg

Terry Robinson / Say No … in Boroughbridge – 2


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#8
caltrek

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The Case of the Disappearing Federal Housing Subsidy

 

https://nonprofitqua...ousing-subsidy/

 

Introduction:

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) According to the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), a total of 3.05 million units of affordable housing were built between 1987 and 2016 through the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program. Of course, more was needed. As reported in NPQ, between 2000 and 2015, one group estimates that the shortfall totaled 7.3 million housing units.

 

But the situation could, alas, get even worse, as close to 500,000 of the 3 million LIHTC units are slated to lose their federal affordable housing subsidy in the next decade, according to a report titled Balancing Priorities, which was released earlier this month by the National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC) and the Public and Affordable Housing Research Corporation (PAHRC). The reason? It so happens that LIHTC subsidies typically expire after 30 years. And, since the program began in 1987, 31 years ago, phase-outs are starting to occur. HUD notes that “An average of over 1,435 projects and 108,810 units were placed in service annually between 1995 to 2016.” But in 2029 alone, 95,000 units will lose their subsidy. In short, net affordable housing through LIHTC could drop toward zero.

 

As Jared Brey in Next City explains, “Some units in highly desirable neighborhoods could quickly be converted to market-rate rents, while many more units in neighborhoods with lower demand could start to physically deteriorate without additional capital for rehabilitation.”

 

“Really, what we need is more resources for preservation,” says Andrew Aurand, vice president for research at NLIHC and a co-author of the report. “Short of that, we have to make these types of decisions about where it makes sense to invest for preservation and where it makes sense to invest for new development.”

 

Keely Stater, director of research and industry intelligence at PAHRC and a second coauthor of the report, observes that, “I think, at the very least, it’s going to require an extensive amount of planning and pulling together resources and communities working together to figure out their strategy for what to do when these units expire.”

housing-monopoly.jpg

"Saving is for wimps! I have a plan for affordable housing,”

Woodley Wonderworks


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#9
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Judge Says $2 Billion Plan to Save NYC Housing Falls Short

 

https://www.courthou...ng-falls-short/

 

Introduction:

 

MANHATTAN (Courthouse News) – Calling for a dramatic overhaul of New York City public housing, a federal judge blocked a proposed consent decree Wednesday that would have spent more than $2 billion on fixes.

 

“This case is about the disastrous human toll resulting from a complete bureaucratic breakdown of the largest public housing agency in the United States,” U.S. District Judge William Pauley III wrote. “NYCHA’s stated mission is to provide safe, decent, and affordable housing for the 400,000 or more low and moderate-income New Yorkers who live in approximately 175,000 apartments in 326 housing developments.”

 

Although federal and city officials entered into the landmark settlement in July, the deal quickly gathered scores of detractors. In his ruling today, Pauley described how droves of tenants and elected officials urged him at a September hearing to scuttle the agreement.

 

“One after another, they rendered harrowing accounts of the squalid conditions in their apartments and the indifference of NYCHA management, called for the firing or prosecution of NYCHA officials, and urged greater tenant participation in the negotiation and enforcement of the proposed consent decree,” Pauley wrote.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#10
caltrek

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“Pretty Much a Failure”: HUD Inspections Pass Dangerous Apartments Filled With Rats, Roaches and Toxic Mold

 

https://www.propubli...ches-toxic-mold

 

Introduction:

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) In the winter of 2017, a toddler was rushed to the emergency room after swallowing rodent poison inside her family’s unit at the federally subsidized Clay Arsenal Renaissance Apartments in Hartford, Connecticut. Her mother had placed sticky traps throughout the house after another one of her children was bitten on the arm by a mouse, according to a local housing advocate who worked with the family.

 

This August, Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley sued the St. Louis Housing Authority and the private management company it hired to run the Clinton-Peabody Housing Complex, saying they both violated the state’s consumer protection laws by advertising that the development was habitable even though it was plagued by a pest infestation, black mold and water damage.

 

That same month, residents of Texas Coppertree Village Apartments in Houston filed suit against the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, saying the federal government had failed to hold their landlord accountable for deplorable conditions and criminal activity at the federally subsidized complex, including rapes, aggravated assaults and robberies.

 

In all three cases, despite well-known, long-standing problems, the properties had passed their most-recent inspections mandated by HUD.

Apartment complexes subsidized by HUD collectively house more than 2 million low-income families around the country. Some are run by public housing authorities and others are owned by private for-profit or nonprofit landlords. By law, the owners of such complexes must pass inspections demonstrating they are decent, safe and sanitary in exchange for millions of dollars in federal money each year.

20181115-McBride-2.jpg

The McBride housing development in Cairo, Illinois’ southernmost city, was shuttered after HUD determined it was uninhabitable last year.

 (Will Widmer, special to ProPublica)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#11
caltrek

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Domicology: A new way to fight blight before buildings are even constructed

 

https://theconversat...nstructed-82582

 

Introduction:

 

(The Conversation) Detroit has been demolishing about 200 vacant houses per week since December 2014, with a goal to take down 6,000 houses in one year. Much of the demolition work is concentrated in about 20 neighborhoodswhere the blight removal is projected to have immediate positive effects of improving remaining property values and clearing land for future development.

 

While Detroit may be an extreme example, economic decline, disinvestment, racial segregation and natural and human-made disasters have left other American communities with unprecedented amounts of structural debris, abandonment and blight, too.

 

As scholars who focus on understanding the complex circumstances that have led to blight, we also have some ideas about potential solutions that could prevent this cycle the next time around.

 

We’ve coined the term domicology to describe our study of the life cycles of the built environment. It examines the continuum from the planning, design and construction stages through to the end of use, abandonment and deconstruction or reuse of structures.

 

Domicology recognizes the cyclical nature of the built environment. Ultimately we’re imagining a world where no building has to be demolished. Structures will be designed with the idea that once they reach the end of their usefulness, they can be deconstructed with the valuable components repurposed or recycled.


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#12
caltrek

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California Lawmakers Tackle Housing Crisis in First Day of New Session

 

https://www.courthou...of-new-session/

 

Introduction:

 

(Courthouse News) SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Looking to greenlight a housing boom through a cash infusion for downtrodden local planning agencies, California lawmakers are promising a flurry of bills to fix the state’s housing crisis.

 

On the first official day of the new two-year legislative session, two Northern California Democrats introduced a measure that would help revive a revenue stream shuttered during the last recession that for decades allowed cities to keep billions in state property taxes and spend it on housing.

 

State senators Mike McGuire and Jim Beall said lawmakers need to “overhaul” their recent handling of the statewide housing shortage and incentivize rural and urban planners to approve new projects.

 

“All across our state, from rural cities of the North Coast to the bustling suburbs of greater Los Angeles, every community is facing an affordable housing crisis,” McGuire, D-Healdsburg, said in a statement. “Our affordable housing bills will help working families and seniors live and thrive in the communities they call home by providing funding and innovative solutions to one of this state’s most significant challenges.”


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#13
caltrek

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California Fires Exacerbate State’s Housing Crisis

 

https://nonprofitqua...housing-crisis/

 

Introduction:

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) Tent cities in Butte County, California have become part of the normal scene. After a devastating fire ravaged the town of Paradise, 26,000 residents have been displaced and there is no telling how many of these people will be homeless within the next few months. The residents of Paradise, mostly low-income, retirement-aged individuals, were already vulnerable to housing instability with the skyrocketing real estate costs in California.

 

“Our state (California) has more than 1.7 million low-income households spending more than half their income in housing costs,” said Ben Metcalf, director of the state Department of Housing and Community Development. “When you’re paying that much for housing, with so little left over, even a minor shock can start a cycle of homelessness.” A minor shock would have been the family breadwinner catching the flu and taking unpaid leave for a week. The Camp Fire devastation is a full upheaval of these residents’ lives. Moreover, for retirees living off a fixed income, there is little to no ability to rebuild their lives after such a catastrophe.

 

Yet even as the need for replacement housing is evident, statewide housing development has slowed down, with millions struggling to find or keep housing that they can afford. According to the Los Angeles Times, “Five wildfires over the past 14 months, with November’s Camp Fire the most devastating, have destroyed nearly 21,000 homes across six counties. That total is equivalent to more than 85 percent of all the new housing built in those counties over the past decade, according to Construction Industry Research Board building permit statistics.” Given that the state’s population has increased by 2.4 million (from 37.4 to 39.8 million) in the last eight years, it’s obvious that net housing production has fallen woefully short of demand.

 

California already has the highest homeless population count in the US. There is little doubt that the recent fires will only exponentially exacerbate the growing crisis in the state. With this, nonprofit organizations in the state will need to prepare to serve an increasing number of individuals and families. But, as the homeless population increases, a question for concern is: how will nonprofits continue to serve both the new homeless and the old homeless?


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The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#14
caltrek

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Why Has Housing Supply Increased as Sales Have Slowed Down?

 

https://www.simplify...0bfbbdc2a6710bf

 

Introduction:

 

(Real Estate With Joe Parsons) According to the latest Existing Home Sales Report from the National Association of Realtors (NAR), the inventory of homes for sale this year compared to last year has increased for the last four months, all while sales of existing homes have slowed compared to last year’s numbers.

 

For over three years leading up to this point, the exact opposite was true; Inventory dropped as sales soared.

 

NAR’s Chief Economist Lawrence Yun shed some light on what could be contributing to this shift,

 

“This is the lowest existing home sales level since November 2015. A decade’s high mortgage rates are preventing consumers from making quick decisions on home purchases. All the while, affordable home listings remain low, continuing to spur underperforming sales activity across the country.”

 

Let’s take a deeper look:

 

Interest Rates

 

Since January, 30-year fixed mortgage interest rates have increased nearly a full percentage point (from 3.95% to 4.9%). Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, the National Association of Realtors, and the Mortgage Bankers Association are all in agreement that rates will continue to increase to about 5.2% over the next 12 months.

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#15
funkervogt

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Domicology: A new way to fight blight before buildings are even constructed

 

https://theconversat...nstructed-82582

 

Introduction:

 

(The Conversation) Detroit has been demolishing about 200 vacant houses per week since December 2014, with a goal to take down 6,000 houses in one year. Much of the demolition work is concentrated in about 20 neighborhoodswhere the blight removal is projected to have immediate positive effects of improving remaining property values and clearing land for future development.

 

While Detroit may be an extreme example, economic decline, disinvestment, racial segregation and natural and human-made disasters have left other American communities with unprecedented amounts of structural debris, abandonment and blight, too.

 

As scholars who focus on understanding the complex circumstances that have led to blight, we also have some ideas about potential solutions that could prevent this cycle the next time around.

 

We’ve coined the term domicology to describe our study of the life cycles of the built environment. It examines the continuum from the planning, design and construction stages through to the end of use, abandonment and deconstruction or reuse of structures.

 

Domicology recognizes the cyclical nature of the built environment. Ultimately we’re imagining a world where no building has to be demolished. Structures will be designed with the idea that once they reach the end of their usefulness, they can be deconstructed with the valuable components repurposed or recycled.

 

That's very interesting. I can see how this "lifecycle" design and engineering philosophy would go hand-in-hand with modular, prefabricated building construction. 

 

The housing industry could standardize three or four different types of "housing sub-modules," none of which would be bigger than a 40-foot long shipping container. The different modules could be joined in many different ways to make a nearly infinite number of different houses, in the same way that you could use three different types of Lego pieces to build any shape. 

 

The housing sub-modules would be joined to each other using removable fasteners. Additionally, there would be a greater effort to standardize other aspects of house construction, appliances, and materials. 

 

When a house had outlived its usefulness, it would be easy to break it down into its sub-modules, which could be directly reused elsewhere, or sent back to a factory to be gutted and refurbished. 

 

I recommend reading this McKinsey report on the construction industry as a companion piece: https://www.mckinsey...using-challenge



#16
caltrek

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Ownership as Social Relation: Nonprofit Strategies to Build Community Wealth through Land

 

https://nonprofitqua...h-through-land/

 

Introduction:

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) Ownership is often seen as a very simple concept. “Mine, not yours,” a two-year-old might tell us. The reality, however, is far more complex, as the rights of owners are far from fixed. Indeed, the concept of what ownership means is itself subject to change. For this reason, achieving greater social and economic justice is not just about changing who owns economic assets, but also changing what rights are associated with owning assets. This is because ownership is not simply about who is the legal owner, but also forces us to consider what ownership is and what we mean by the term “ownership.” Fundamentally, ownership is not about possession in isolation; rather, it involves a social relationship of legal rights among people.

 

The reality that ownership is not absolute is particularly obvious if we reflect upon the question of ownership of land. Rhetoric aside, a US homeowner is hardly the king or queen of his or her “castle.” You want to tear down a family home and build a mid-rise apartment building on your pied-à-terre? How about converting your private kitchen into a commercially operating restaurant? If you try to do these things in a typical US residential neighborhood, you’ll quickly learn that your right to “private property” is not as extensive as you thought. Not to mention: you’ll surely end up with many angry neighbors!

 

If your home is in a neighborhood governed by a housing association, you might even find limits on what color you can paint your house or how you take care of your front lawn. We often speak about property ownership as an absolute right, but, again, property is a social relation—your use of “private” property is limited by both law and custom.

 

Indeed, reflecting this insight, real estate law courses typically describe ownership as a “bundle of rights,” rather than a thing.1 And such an ownership “bundle of rights” is not fixed, but varies according to what you and your neighbors agree constitute “private rights” as opposed to other rights that may be assigned to local government or your friendly homeowners’ association.

 

Typically, the bundle of rights is altered to fit specific zoning or neighborhood guidelines. But the bundle of rights can also be altered in other ways too—for example, a community can choose to alter homeownership rights with the goal of promoting broad-based housing affordability.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#17
caltrek

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One of the ways that the United States has been blessed is in its abundance of land. This may be hard to realize in urban areas where overcrowding is now a problem.  Yet from its earliest beginnings, Europeans arrived upon a North American continent largely depopulated by imported European diseases that pre-dated the arrival of the bulk of those Europeans.  Huge tracts of open space land were also badlands of sorts.  Waiting for the proper infrastructure.  Waiting for modern and post modern technology to convert  those badlands into habitable zones.  

 

Home-ownership has historically been defined within capitalist terms.  Yet, it is a path for property ownership by the middle class.  Co-operative forms of ownership have been relatively rare, but homeowners associations have become increasingly common.  Condominiums have also cropped up where workers "own" their homes but not their surrounding property. 

 

Co-operative ownership also opens up new vistas. Prior to retirement I worked with not one, but two such ownership cooperatives.  These cooperatives allowed low-income persons to pool their resources and, with a little help in the form of government subsidies, take collective ownership of property upon which modest dwellings existed. I also worked with self-help housing programs that allowed lower income households to gain their homes in part through sweat equity. Such households gained both the skills and the pride to maintain their homes once they were constructed. 

 

All of this should be seen as the potential basis for moving forward into a future into which low and moderate income individuals gain both adequate shelter and a means of accumulating wealth, even in an otherwise hostile capitalist environment.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#18
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Minneapolis Seeks to Integrate Housing by Eliminating Single-Family Zoning

 

https://nonprofitqua...-family-zoning/

 

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) Earlier this month, Minneapolis, writes Henry Grabar in Slate, became “the first major US city to end single-family home zoning, a policy that has done as much as any to entrench segregation, high housing costs, and sprawl.” The comprehensive plan, passed by City Council on a 12–1 vote, is called Minneapolis 2040 and, as Grabar explains, aims to “permit three-family homes in the city’s residential neighborhoods, abolish parking minimums for all new construction, and allow high-density buildings along transit corridors.” There are still some hoops at the regional and state level to go through, but the plan is expected to take effect by the middle of next year.

 

The ubiquitous R-1 zoning—R-1 meaning “single-family residential”—may seem neutral but has actually been a tool used to promote segregated neighborhoods. As Grabar explains, single-family home zoning was devised as a legal way to keep Blacks and other people of color from moving into certain neighborhoods.

 

“It still functions as an effective barrier today,” Grabar adds.

 

According to Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, the city is abolishing restrictive zoning to begin to reverse the damage wrought by over a century of segregation.

 

“A lot of research has been done on the history that’s led us to this point,” Cam Gordon, a city councilperson who represents the Second Ward, which includes the University of Minnesota’s flagship campus, tells Grabar. “That history helped people realize that the way the city is set up right now is based on this government-endorsed and sanctioned racist system.”


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


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caltrek

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What I Learned Covering HUD: Oversight Failures Are Symptoms of Deeper Dysfunction

 

https://www.propublica.org/article/hud-oversight-failures-are-symptoms-of-deeper-dysfunction

 

Introduction:

(ProPublica) When I pulled my Jeep into the Clay Arsenal neighborhood in Hartford, Connecticut, in July, I knew intuitively that I had arrived by the sights of neglect: Beautifully crafted brick homes in varying stages of decay. Boarded up buildings. A feeling of isolation in an otherwise bustling city.

 

I had driven 1,100 miles from southern Illinois for an appointment with Josh Serrano. He was among a handful of tenants who had led a monthslong campaign to implore the city and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to take action against an absentee landlord over poor conditions. I wanted to meet Serrano because I had covered poor living conditions and seeming federal indifference in places like the Illinois cities of Cairo and East St. Louis, in my region, and he was optimistic that by speaking with one voice, a community could achieve change.

 

 

20181228-hud-column-3x2.jpg

 

In May, HUD informed about 150 families that they have to move out of the Clay Arsenal Renaissance Apartments in Hartford, Connecticut, because of unsafe conditions, including a severe mouse infestation and toxic mold. 

(Sarah Blesener, special to ProPublica)


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


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Sciencerocks

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Minneapolis Seeks to Integrate Housing by Eliminating Single-Family Zoning

 

https://nonprofitqua...-family-zoning/

 

 

(Nonprofit Quarterly) Earlier this month, Minneapolis, writes Henry Grabar in Slate, became “the first major US city to end single-family home zoning, a policy that has done as much as any to entrench segregation, high housing costs, and sprawl.” The comprehensive plan, passed by City Council on a 12–1 vote, is called Minneapolis 2040 and, as Grabar explains, aims to “permit three-family homes in the city’s residential neighborhoods, abolish parking minimums for all new construction, and allow high-density buildings along transit corridors.” There are still some hoops at the regional and state level to go through, but the plan is expected to take effect by the middle of next year.

 

The ubiquitous R-1 zoning—R-1 meaning “single-family residential”—may seem neutral but has actually been a tool used to promote segregated neighborhoods. As Grabar explains, single-family home zoning was devised as a legal way to keep Blacks and other people of color from moving into certain neighborhoods.

 

“It still functions as an effective barrier today,” Grabar adds.

 

According to Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, the city is abolishing restrictive zoning to begin to reverse the damage wrought by over a century of segregation.

 

“A lot of research has been done on the history that’s led us to this point,” Cam Gordon, a city councilperson who represents the Second Ward, which includes the University of Minnesota’s flagship campus, tells Grabar. “That history helped people realize that the way the city is set up right now is based on this government-endorsed and sanctioned racist system.”

 

 

So people can't choose to live with who they wish? We're one of the biggest police states in the world and don't believe in freedom as our government treats its people like trash. Caltrek, it is time to stop calling ourselves the land of the free.

Even Britain is more free.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: United States, Housing, Economics, HUD, Community Reinvestment Act, Elizabeth Warren

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