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New Subreddit: /r/AcceleratingChange


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#1
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

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I hinted at it when I wrote my impromptu essay on how exciting it is to live through an era of great change:

I actually have a whole "Saved" section full of geriatric Redditors talking about life in the past and historians laying out how change came so rapidly that it would make modern Singularitarians blush. How it was a world of seeming contradictions...

After gathering even more posts as well as finding stories and stats from other sites, I realized that I ought to create a subreddit for this phenomenon. Basically posts about how life was in the past and how extreme change has been since then.

 

https://www.reddit.c...leratingChange/


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And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.


#2
Maximus

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This graph came to mind right away when I saw the title:

Technology-Adoption.png?w=620&h=600&

I wonder if there are any similar graphs with more recent data. It would be fascinating to to see how fast emerging general purpose technologies are being adopted. I can't really think of any candidate emerging GPT right now; this could be explained by a gap between emerging technology and translation into attractive/affordable consumer products. It's obvious that technologies like quantum computing, and AR (among countless others) hold massive potential for reshaping the world.Yet, despite the constant stream of amazing discoveries we see almost on a daily basis, a viable consumer-ready product is still far off on the horizon for most of these technologies. 

 

This leads to a strange scenario where historical data shows us that the adoption rates of new technologies should be skyrocketing, and yet if you were to time-travel from 2008 to 2018, barring a few niche technologies like VR, the world around you would by and large look as if time had barely moved (in terms of visible technology). Fortunately, or perhaps rather unfortunately for some, this technological ice-age should come to an end soon. Many of the cutting edge technologies we read about now will mature over the next few years or so, leading to the possibility of the 2020s being a decade of great technological upheaval. We will see the seemingly simultaneous release of consumer-friendly adaptations of these technologies, coupled with the lack of widespread technological disruption over the past decade: this will lead to--as Yuli puts it--a serious case of future shock for many.


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#3
Yuli Ban

Yuli Ban

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Future shock really is a beautiful thing. It is annoying, and yet also lovely, to hear elders bemoan the rate of change and how things are so different from the way it was when they were children (aka "the way it ought to be"). 

Futurum transit sepulcris


And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.





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