Jump to content

Welcome to FutureTimeline.forum
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

History of Language

History of Language Sumeria Egypt China Mesoamerica Archaeology Linguistics

  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#21
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,245 posts

"The first known literature in the Cornish tongue..." was written in 1400 A.D. My source for this is the Concise History of the World  edited by Neil Kagan.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#22
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,245 posts

Here is an old thread that is very much in the spirit of the thread you are reading:

 

https://www.futureti...d-by-americans/


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#23
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,245 posts

Biophilia

 

 

To the sense of fulfilment one experiences upon contemplating nature in its purest splendor, Edward O. Wilson gives the name biophilia. Biophilia, the experience of transcendence, Wilson believes is rooted in the human mind.  It is triggered, he wrote in 1984, by experiencing what seems a return to origins.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#24
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,245 posts

Hauntology

 

https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Hauntology

 

 

(Wikipedia) Hauntology (a portmanteau of haunting and ontology[1]) is a philosophical concept referring to the return or persistence of elements from the past, as in the manner of a ghost. The term was coined by French philosopher Jacques Derrida in his 1993 book Spectres of Marx. It has since been invoked in fields such as visual arts, philosophy, electronic music, politics, fiction and literary criticism.[2]

 

Derrida used the term to refer to the atemporal nature of Marxism and its tendency to "'haunt Western society from beyond the grave.'"[3] The concept describes a situation of temporal and ontological disjunction in which presence is replaced by a deferred non-origin.[2] The concept is derived from his deconstructive method, in which any attempt to locate the origin of identity or history must inevitably find itself dependent on an always-already existing set of linguistic conditions.[4] Despite being the central focus of Spectres of Marx, the word hauntology appears only three times in the book, and there is little consistency in how other writers define the term.[5]

 

In the 2000s, the term was taken up by critics in reference to paradoxes found in late modernity, particularly contemporary culture's persistent recycling of retro aesthetics and incapacity to escape old social forms.[4] Writers such as Mark Fisher and Simon Reynolds used the term to describe a 2000s musical genre preoccupied with this temporal disjunction and the nostalgia for "lost futures".[3]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.futureti...language/page-2


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#25
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,245 posts

 

 

...the poet is the Namer, or Language-maker, naming things sometimes after their appearance, sometimes after their essence, and giving to every one its own name and not another's, thereby rejoicing the intellect, which delights the detachment or boundary.  The poet made all the words, and therefore language is the archives of history, and if we must say it, a sort of tomb of the muses.  For though the origin of most of our words is forgotten, each word was at first a stroke of genius, and obtained currency, because for the moment it symbolized the world to the first speaker and to the hearer.  the etymologist finds the deadest word to have been once a brilliant picture. Language is fossil poetry. As the limestone of the continent consists of infinite masses of the shells of animalcules, so language is made up of images, or tropes, which now, in their secondary use, have long ceased to remind us of their poetic origin. But the poet names the thing because he sees it, or comes one step nearer to it than any other.

 

Ralph Waldo Emerson 

 


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#26
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,245 posts

Quarantine

 

https://theconversat...of-years-130680

 

Extract:

 

(The Conversation) In 1377, the seaport in Ragusa, modern day Dubrovnik, issued a “trentina” – derived from the Italian word for 30 (trenta). Ships traveling from areas with high rates of plague were required to stay offshore for 30 days before docking. Anyone onboard who was healthy at the end of the waiting period was presumed unlikely to spread the infection and allowed onshore.

 

Thirty was eventually extended to 40 days, giving rise to the term quarantine, from the Italian word for 40 (quaranta). It was in Ragusa that the first law to enforce the act of quarantine was implemented.

 

Over time, variations in the nature and regulation of quarantine emerged. Port officials asked travelers to certify they hadn’t been to areas with severe disease outbreaks, before allowing them to enter. In the 19th century, quarantine was abused for political and economic reasons, leading to the call for international conferences to standardize quarantine practices. Cholera epidemics throughout the early 19th century made clear the lack of any uniformity of policy.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#27
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,245 posts

Crises

 

In ancient Greece, crises were "moments of truth when the significance of men and events were brought to light."  Another meaning was the "turning point" of an illness "in which it is decided whether or not the (individual) organisms' self-healing powers are sufficient for recovery.

 

In a footnote to this passage, the author James O'Connor expands upon this point:

 

Quote

...crises "occur in diseases whenever the disease increases in intensity or goes away or changes into another disease or ends altogether."  In Melvin Rader's words, "Hippocrates introduced the term 'crisis" to characterize the turning point in a disease when death or recovery hangs in the balance." 

 

From The Meaning of Crises, first published in 1987page 54 - 55.


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#28
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,245 posts

Influenza

 

The name "influenza" originated in the 15th century in Italy, from an epidemic attributed to the "influence of the stars", which, according to Ginctrac, raged across Europe and perhaps in Asia and Africa.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC5139605/


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#29
caltrek

caltrek

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,245 posts

Here is Webster's 1848 American Dictionary definition of socialism:

 

Socialism, n. A social state in which there is a community of property among all the citizens; a new term for Agrarianism.  (See Communism).

 

This definition is discussed in Daniel Bell's 1967 edition (third printing)  of  Marxian Socialism in the United States, page 18.  


The principles of justice define an appropriate path between dogmatism and intolerance on the one side, and a reductionism which regards religion and morality as mere preferences on the other.   - John Rawls


#30
Time_Traveller

Time_Traveller

    Master of Time Travel

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,193 posts
  • LocationLands End, San Francisco June 3rd 1897

This is a video on How old is written sanskrit?

 


“One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away.”

 

Stephen Hawking






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: History of Language, Sumeria, Egypt, China, Mesoamerica, Archaeology, Linguistics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users